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Research shows that education plays smaller role in delaying motherhood among UK women

Research shows that education plays smaller role in delaying motherhood among UK women

Studies have suggested that over recent decades, UK women have postponed motherhood largely because they want to go onto college or university to gain qualifications or fulfil educational aspirations before starting a family. [More]
Mylan announces U.S. launch of generic Zovia Tablets

Mylan announces U.S. launch of generic Zovia Tablets

Mylan N.V., today announced the U.S. launch of Ethynodiol Diacetate and Ethinyl Estradiol Tablets USP, 1 mg / 0.05 mg. Mylan's product was determined to be bioequivalent and, therefore, therapeutically equivalent to the reference listed drug, Zovia® 1/50E-28 Tablets (Watson). [More]
New active pharmaceutical ingredient may help against severe forms of testicular cancer

New active pharmaceutical ingredient may help against severe forms of testicular cancer

A new active pharmaceutical ingredient may help against severe forms of testicular cancer, which only respond inadequately to other therapies. [More]
Majority of GPs do not offer full range of contraceptive methods to patients, survey finds

Majority of GPs do not offer full range of contraceptive methods to patients, survey finds

A survey of more than 1,000 GPs across England has highlighted worrying gaps in contraceptive provision. [More]
New ASRM embryo transfer simulator garners positive response from reproductive health professionals

New ASRM embryo transfer simulator garners positive response from reproductive health professionals

Introduced in October 2015 at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Annual Scientific Congress, the ASRM Embryo Transfer Simulator (“Simulator”) has been successfully deployed over the last 12 months at embryo transfer simulation workshops and training sessions from Alabama to Helsinki, garnering positive response from the hundreds of physicians and healthcare professionals who have experienced working with the Simulator, most recently in Salt Lake City, UT at the ASRM 2016 Scientific Congress & Expo. [More]
Hormonal contraception least likely to be linked to thromboembolic events in diabetic women

Hormonal contraception least likely to be linked to thromboembolic events in diabetic women

Strokes and heart attacks are rare for women with diabetes who use hormonal contraception, with the safest options being intrauterine devices (IUDs) and under-the-skin implants, new research published in Diabetes Care shows. [More]
Contraceptives do not lower sexual desire, research reveals

Contraceptives do not lower sexual desire, research reveals

Taking the pill doesn't lower your sexual desire, contrary to popular belief, according to research published in The Journal of Sexual Medicine. [More]
Socioeconomic status could affect use of contraceptives among young women

Socioeconomic status could affect use of contraceptives among young women

The use of contraceptives has increased among young women in Gothenburg, but not in areas that are socially vulnerable. This is the finding from a long-term study from Sahlgrenska Academy spanning four generations of young women. [More]
Hormonal contraceptives linked to more sex in committed relationships

Hormonal contraceptives linked to more sex in committed relationships

Sex is quite wonderful when the goal is to have children. But sex can also serve as a "glue" in a committed relationship. [More]
Concerns about weight gain may affect contraception choices

Concerns about weight gain may affect contraception choices

Concerns about weight gain may be driving contraception choices, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Self-injection of contraceptive feasible, acceptable among women in sub-Saharan Africa, research reveals

Self-injection of contraceptive feasible, acceptable among women in sub-Saharan Africa, research reveals

Self-injection of the contraceptive Sayana® Press is both feasible and highly acceptable among women participating in the first such research study conducted in sub-Saharan Africa, according to results published online by the journal Contraception. [More]
Allergan launches first and only oral contraceptive in softgel capsule for prevention of pregnancy

Allergan launches first and only oral contraceptive in softgel capsule for prevention of pregnancy

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company, today announced the availability of TAYTULLA (norethindrone acetate and ethinyl estradiol capsules and ferrous fumarate capsules), 1mg/20mcg, the first and only oral contraceptive in a softgel capsule for the prevention of pregnancy [More]
Reproductive history and use of oral contraceptives linked to women’s cognitive function in later life

Reproductive history and use of oral contraceptives linked to women’s cognitive function in later life

In a study of healthy postmenopausal women, reproductive life events related to sex hormones, including earlier age at menarche, later age at last pregnancy, length of reproductive period, and use of oral contraceptives were positively related to aspects of cognition in later life. [More]
Men have positive attitude towards new male contraceptive, study finds

Men have positive attitude towards new male contraceptive, study finds

A new study has found that men have positive attitudes towards an innovative male contraceptive, Vasalgel. The landmark study, published in Cogent Medicine, is the first insight into how men perceive the new contraceptive and gives promising signs that Vasalgel may revolutionise approaches to reproductive health. [More]
Men can take contraceptives to prevent pregnancy in female partners, study shows

Men can take contraceptives to prevent pregnancy in female partners, study shows

Men can take birth control shots to prevent pregnancy in their female partners, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Clinical trial finds women with heavy periods can be greatly helped by GP-prescribed treatments

Clinical trial finds women with heavy periods can be greatly helped by GP-prescribed treatments

The largest and longest running clinical trial of medical therapies for heavy periods has found that women can be greatly helped by having treatments just from their GP, with most avoiding hospital operations. [More]
Special issue of American Journal of Public Health explores impacts of Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program

Special issue of American Journal of Public Health explores impacts of Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program

A new supplement of the American Journal of Public Health out today explores the impacts of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Adolescent Health's Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program. This Journal issue contains expert commentary, research and recommendations based on outcomes from the program's implementation. [More]
Study data does not support benefits of testosterone supplementation in men with ‘low T’

Study data does not support benefits of testosterone supplementation in men with ‘low T’

The prescription of testosterone supplementation for cardiovascular health, sexual function, physical function, mood, or cognitive function in men with "low T" is not supported by clinical trials data, conclude researchers who describe a review of more than 200 clinical trials published Sept. 21 in PLOS One. [More]
LARC benefits wider population of potential users than previously thought

LARC benefits wider population of potential users than previously thought

New research provides strong scientific evidence that long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) benefits a wider population of potential users than previously thought. [More]
Oral contraceptive use may be reason for decline in mortality from ovarian cancer worldwide

Oral contraceptive use may be reason for decline in mortality from ovarian cancer worldwide

Deaths from ovarian cancer fell worldwide between 2002 and 2012 and are predicted to continue to decline in the USA, European Union and, though to a smaller degree, in Japan by 2020, according to new research published in the leading cancer journal Annals of Oncology today (Tuesday). [More]
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