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Study data does not support benefits of testosterone supplementation in men with ‘low T’

Study data does not support benefits of testosterone supplementation in men with ‘low T’

The prescription of testosterone supplementation for cardiovascular health, sexual function, physical function, mood, or cognitive function in men with "low T" is not supported by clinical trials data, conclude researchers who describe a review of more than 200 clinical trials published Sept. 21 in PLOS One. [More]
LARC benefits wider population of potential users than previously thought

LARC benefits wider population of potential users than previously thought

New research provides strong scientific evidence that long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) benefits a wider population of potential users than previously thought. [More]
Oral contraceptive use may be reason for decline in mortality from ovarian cancer worldwide

Oral contraceptive use may be reason for decline in mortality from ovarian cancer worldwide

Deaths from ovarian cancer fell worldwide between 2002 and 2012 and are predicted to continue to decline in the USA, European Union and, though to a smaller degree, in Japan by 2020, according to new research published in the leading cancer journal Annals of Oncology today (Tuesday). [More]
Women using contraception containing estrogen may have high vitamin D levels, study shows

Women using contraception containing estrogen may have high vitamin D levels, study shows

Women risk having their vitamin D levels fall when they stop using birth control pills or other contraceptives containing estrogen, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Pew survey shows Americans worry about using emerging technologies for human enhancement

Pew survey shows Americans worry about using emerging technologies for human enhancement

Many in the general public think scientific and technological innovations bring helpful change to society, but they are more concerned than excited when it comes to the potential use of emerging technologies to make people's minds sharper, their bodies stronger and healthier than ever before, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. [More]
Gates Institute launches new global urban reproductive health program

Gates Institute launches new global urban reproductive health program

The Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for Population and Reproductive Health, based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, is launching The Challenge Initiative, a global urban reproductive health program supported by a three-year, $42 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. [More]
Lancet study highlights long-term effect of 1999 nationwide strategy to reduce teenage pregnancy

Lancet study highlights long-term effect of 1999 nationwide strategy to reduce teenage pregnancy

Rates of teenage pregnancy in England have halved since the implementation of the Government's Teenage Pregnancy Strategy (TPS) in 1999, and the greatest effect is seen in areas of high deprivation and areas that received the most TPS funding, according to research published in The Lancet. [More]
Sexual abstinence, marital fidelity programs not effective in reducing HIV risk

Sexual abstinence, marital fidelity programs not effective in reducing HIV risk

The U.S. government has invested $1.4 billion in HIV prevention programs that promote sexual abstinence and marital fidelity, but there is no evidence that these programs have been effective at changing sexual behavior and reducing HIV risk, according to a new Stanford University School of Medicine study. [More]
Abortion rates at all-time low in developed countries, but unchanged in the developing world

Abortion rates at all-time low in developed countries, but unchanged in the developing world

Abortion rates have dropped to an all-time low in developed countries, but remain the same in developing countries, where it is often unsafe to have an abortion, report researchers. [More]
Women often excluded from type 2 diabetes drug trials

Women often excluded from type 2 diabetes drug trials

While women who are pregnant, or breastfeeding or who may become pregnant are often excluded from clinical trials for type 2 diabetes drugs, the exclusion is frequently not based on the risk of fetal harm, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers and may be contributing to the underrepresentation of women in clinical trials and an incomplete understanding of the effects of drugs on women who become pregnant unexpectedly. [More]
Mozambique women who use modern contraceptives more likely to undergo HIV testing

Mozambique women who use modern contraceptives more likely to undergo HIV testing

Women in sub-Saharan Africa who use modern contraceptives are more likely to be tested for HIV than those who do not, according to a study published April 25, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Katherine Center from the University of Arizona and colleagues. [More]
Hormonal contraception may increase susceptibility of women to genital infection

Hormonal contraception may increase susceptibility of women to genital infection

Women account for approximately half of all individuals living with HIV worldwide, and researchers wanted to identify the risk factors that increase susceptibility of women to genital infection. [More]
Researchers reach milestone in developing non-hormonal approach to male contraception

Researchers reach milestone in developing non-hormonal approach to male contraception

Researchers studying strategies to develop a non-hormonal approach to male contraception have reached an important milestone in their work, discovering a way to produce a key enzyme found only in sperm in sufficient quantities that they can begin designing drugs to stop the sperm from swimming to the egg. [More]
Scientists identify RingoA protein as key regulator of meiosis

Scientists identify RingoA protein as key regulator of meiosis

Published today in Nature Communications, a study by scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine headed by ICREA researcher Angel R. Nebreda has reported that the protein RingoA is a key regulator of meiosis--the cell division process that gives rise to ovules and sperm for sexual reproduction in mammals. [More]
Certain types of hormonal contraceptives may increase risk of seizures in women with epilepsy

Certain types of hormonal contraceptives may increase risk of seizures in women with epilepsy

Could certain types of hormonal contraceptives cause an increase in seizures in women with epilepsy? A recent Texas A&M Health Science Center study suggests that ethinyl estradiol, the primary component of oral contraceptives, could be detrimental to the epileptic brain. [More]
Oregon's new birth control law could improve access to all forms of contraception

Oregon's new birth control law could improve access to all forms of contraception

Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University, University of Minnesota School of Public Health and George Mason University applaud Oregon's new birth control law which allows women age 18 or older to obtain some methods of hormonal contraception directly from pharmacies, without having to visit a prescribing clinician, yet note how the law could go even further to improve access to all forms of contraception, according to a viewpoint article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association today. [More]
UC Berkeley biologists discover potential target for unisex contraceptives

UC Berkeley biologists discover potential target for unisex contraceptives

UC Berkeley biologists have discovered the switch that triggers the power kick sperm use to penetrate and fertilize a human egg, uncovering a possible source of male infertility but also a potential target for contraceptives that work in both men and women. [More]
Simple tool for inserting intrauterine device may offer low-cost option for long-term contraception

Simple tool for inserting intrauterine device may offer low-cost option for long-term contraception

A simple tool designed for inserting an intrauterine device may offer women in the developing world a convenient, low-cost option for long-term contraception. [More]
Women taking birth control pill less likely to suffer serious knee injuries

Women taking birth control pill less likely to suffer serious knee injuries

Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that women who take the birth control pill, which lessen and stabilize estrogen levels, were less likely to suffer serious knee injuries. The findings are currently available in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, the official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine. [More]
Oral contraceptives increase rare stroke risk in obese women

Oral contraceptives increase rare stroke risk in obese women

Researchers have found that obese women taking oral contraceptives have an increased risk of cerebral venous thrombosis and should be educated about this risk accordingly. [More]
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