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Blueberries may be effective in treatment for PTSD

Blueberries may be effective in treatment for PTSD

Up to 8 percent of people in the U.S. suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as the result of witnessing or being the victim of a traumatic event. People with PTSD have been in a situation in which they were at risk of death, serious injury or sexual violence or have seen first-hand loved ones faces such threats. They may experience flashbacks, emotional detachment and jumpiness, among other symptoms that affect their ability to function in everyday life. [More]
New study may help decode attention deficit disorders

New study may help decode attention deficit disorders

Sometimes being too focused on a task is not a good thing. During tasks that require our attention, we might become so engrossed in what we are doing that we fail to notice there is a better way to get the job done. [More]
Researchers examine neural synchronization between leaders and their followers

Researchers examine neural synchronization between leaders and their followers

Great leaders are often good communicators. In the process of communication, the relationship between leaders and their followers develops spontaneously according to new research from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig and the State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning and IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research in Beijing. [More]
Brain-somatic-activating mutations in MTOR cause focal cortical dysplasia type II

Brain-somatic-activating mutations in MTOR cause focal cortical dysplasia type II

Epilepsy is a brain disorder that afflicts more than 50 million people worldwide. Many epilepsy patients can control their symptoms through medication, but about 30% suffer from intractable epilepsy and are unable to manage the disease with drugs. Intractable epilepsy causes multiple seizures, permanent mental, physical, and developmental disabilities, and even death. [More]
DePuy Synthes launches TFNA System to improve outcomes in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery

DePuy Synthes launches TFNA System to improve outcomes in patients undergoing hip fracture surgery

DePuy Synthes Companies of Johnson & Johnson has launched the TFN-ADVANCED Proximal Femoral Nailing System (TFNA), a nail, blade and screw system designed to improve patient outcomes by more closely matching the anatomy of patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. [More]
Study: Progression of dysfunctional tau protein drives cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease

Study: Progression of dysfunctional tau protein drives cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease

By examining more than 3,600 postmortem brains, researchers at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Jacksonville, Florida, and Rochester, Minnesota, have found that the progression of dysfunctional tau protein drives the cognitive decline and memory loss seen in Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Hypermethylation serves as protective barrier inhibiting development of ALS, FTD

Hypermethylation serves as protective barrier inhibiting development of ALS, FTD

Penn Medicine researchers have discovered that hypermethylation - the epigenetic ability to turn down or turn off a bad gene implicated in 10 to 30 percent of patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) - serves as a protective barrier inhibiting the development of these diseases. [More]
New methodology isolates functional differences between autistic, non-autistic brains

New methodology isolates functional differences between autistic, non-autistic brains

The functional differences between autistic and non-autistic brains have been isolated for the first time, following the development of a new methodology for analysing MRI scans. [More]
Study offers new insights into diagnosis and treatment of social dysfunctions

Study offers new insights into diagnosis and treatment of social dysfunctions

What if there were a pill that made you more compassionate and more likely to give spare change to someone less fortunate? UC Berkeley scientists have taken a big step in that direction. [More]
BAI researchers develop new brain image analysis method to better track amyloid changes

BAI researchers develop new brain image analysis method to better track amyloid changes

Researchers from Banner Alzheimer's Institute have developed a new brain image analysis method to better track the progression of beta-amyloid plaque deposition, a characteristic brain abnormality in Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine. [More]

Max Planck Florida Institute receives NIH grant to study cerebral cortex function and development

Dr. David Fitzpatrick, Scientific Director and CEO at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, has been awarded a $2.4 million five-year grant from the National Eye Institute (NEI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the functional organization and development of neural circuits in the cerebral cortex, specifically, in the area of brain responsible for processing visual information. [More]
Cannabis abuse affects long-term memory, finds new Northwestern Medicine study

Cannabis abuse affects long-term memory, finds new Northwestern Medicine study

Teens who were heavy marijuana users - smoking it daily for about three years -- had an abnormally shaped hippocampus and performed poorly on long-term memory tasks, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Neuralstem reports top line data from NSI-566 Phase II trial for treatment of ALS

Neuralstem reports top line data from NSI-566 Phase II trial for treatment of ALS

Neuralstem, Inc. announced top line data from the Phase II trial of NSI-566 spinal cord-derived neural stem cells under development for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The study met primary safety endpoints. The maximum tolerated dose of 16 million transplanted cells and the surgery was well tolerated. [More]
NYU researchers devise computer model to explain how neural circuit learns to categorize

NYU researchers devise computer model to explain how neural circuit learns to categorize

New York University researchers have devised a computer model to explain how a neural circuit learns to classify sensory stimuli into discrete categories, such as "car vs. motorcycle." Their findings, which appear in the journal Nature Communications, shed new light on the brain processes underpinning judgments we make on a daily basis. [More]
Researchers take important step in repairing the cerebral cortex of adult mouse

Researchers take important step in repairing the cerebral cortex of adult mouse

A team led by Afsaneh Gaillard (Inserm Unit 1084, Experimental and Clinical Neurosciences Laboratory, University of Poitiers), in collaboration with the Institute of Interdisciplinary Research in Human and Molecular Biology (IRIBHM) in Brussels, has just taken an important step in the area of cell therapy: repairing the cerebral cortex of the adult mouse using a graft of cortical neurons derived from embryonic stem cells. [More]
New study shows how presenilin gene mutations may lead to familial Alzheimer's disease

New study shows how presenilin gene mutations may lead to familial Alzheimer's disease

Mutations in the presenilin-1 gene are the most common cause of inherited, early-onset forms of Alzheimer's disease. In a new study, published in Neuron, scientists replaced the normal mouse presenilin-1 gene with Alzheimer's-causing forms of the human gene to discover how these genetic changes may lead to the disorder. [More]
Rat study reveals role of lead in schizophrenia

Rat study reveals role of lead in schizophrenia

A study of the brains of rats exposed to lead has uncovered striking similarities with what is known about the brains of human schizophrenia patients, adding compelling evidence that lead is a factor in the onset of schizophrenia. [More]
Neuroscientists reveal how olfaction is encoded in the brain

Neuroscientists reveal how olfaction is encoded in the brain

In a study that helps to deconstruct how olfaction is encoded in the brain, neuroscientists at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a type of neuron that appears to help tune, amplify and dampen neuronal responses to chemosensory inputs from the nasal cavity. [More]

Perceptual learning training can improve contrast sensitivity in older adults

Older adults whose vision is affected by declining contrast sensitivity - which is a factor in the ability to detect and resolve details in low light - can improve their ability to see with perceptual learning training, according to researchers at the University of California, Riverside and Brown University. [More]
Traffic signal labels help consumers resist high-calorie foods

Traffic signal labels help consumers resist high-calorie foods

Should food products be labeled with traffic light symbols to make health-related information on ingredients easier to understand? This question has remained a subject of debate. Now researchers at the University of Bonn have reached the conclusion that the traffic light label is more effective in helping consumers resist high-calorie foods than a purely information-based label. [More]
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