Cortex News and Research RSS Feed - Cortex News and Research

Study provides detailed brain map of language impairments in aphasia after stroke

Study provides detailed brain map of language impairments in aphasia after stroke

The exchange of words, speaking and listening in conversation, may seem unremarkable for most people, but communicating with others is a challenge for people who have aphasia, an impairment of language that often happens after stroke or other brain injury. [More]
Study paves way for greater understanding of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Study paves way for greater understanding of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Researchers at the Angiocardioneurology Department of the Neuromed Scientific Institute for Research, Hospitalisation and Health Care of Pozzilli (Italy), have found, in animal models, that the absence of a certain enzyme causes a syndrome resembling the Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). [More]
Lack of fish oil fatty acids can limit brain growth during fetal development and early in life

Lack of fish oil fatty acids can limit brain growth during fetal development and early in life

While recent reports question whether fish oil supplements support heart health, UC Irvine scientists have found that the fatty acids they contain are vitally important to the developing brain. [More]
Phase–amplitude coupling changes may underlie DBS success in parkinsonism

Phase–amplitude coupling changes may underlie DBS success in parkinsonism

Deep-brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus may improve motor symptoms in patients with Parkinson’s disease by reducing excessive cortical phase–amplitude coupling, researchers report in Nature Neuroscience. [More]
Mindfulness meditation can reduce pain, anxiety in healthy individuals

Mindfulness meditation can reduce pain, anxiety in healthy individuals

When Rebecca Erwin was a varsity rower at the University of North Carolina, the coach had the team's members take a yoga and meditation class. [More]
Study changes our understanding of how position and touch signals are combined in brain

Study changes our understanding of how position and touch signals are combined in brain

Two types of touch information — the feel of an object and the position of an animal's limb — have long been thought to flow into the brain via different channels and be integrated in sophisticated processing regions. [More]
fMRI can predict language development outcomes in ASD toddlers

fMRI can predict language development outcomes in ASD toddlers

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers say it may be possible to predict future language development outcomes in toddlers with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), even before they've been formally diagnosed with the condition. [More]
Mental practice, physical therapy effective for stroke survivors

Mental practice, physical therapy effective for stroke survivors

A combination of mental practice and physical therapy is an effective treatment for people recovering from a stroke, according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
Study looks at connections between cerebral cortex and cerebellum in children with autism

Study looks at connections between cerebral cortex and cerebellum in children with autism

In early childhood, the neurons inside children's developing brains form connections between various regions of brain "real estate." As described in a paper published last week in the journal Biological Psychiatry, cognitive neuroscientists at San Diego State University found that in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder, the connections between the cerebral cortex and the cerebellum appear to be overdeveloped in sensorimotor regions of the brain. [More]

Brain's primary visual cortex can drive the timing of actions

When managing, assigning each task to a specialist is often the most efficient strategy. Most researchers regard the brain as working similarly, with each region specialized to a given task. But Johns Hopkins neuroscientists have found, in rats, that the brain's primary visual cortex (VC) not only portrays the visual world but can also drive the timing of actions. [More]
Study: Broken communication in brain regions appears to worsen Huntington's disease

Study: Broken communication in brain regions appears to worsen Huntington's disease

Indiana University researchers have found that broken communication in a specific part of the brain plays a role in the involuntary physical movements that affect individuals with Huntington's disease. [More]
UV researchers study neurobiological link between ASD and epilepsy

UV researchers study neurobiological link between ASD and epilepsy

Researchers at the University of Veracruz (UV), in the west coast of Mexico, study the neurobiological link between the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and epilepsy, in order to understand the reason why the brain of an autistic child is 20-30 percent more susceptible to seizures that an infant without this condition. [More]
NTU Singapore scientists find new way to treat dementia

NTU Singapore scientists find new way to treat dementia

Pushing new frontiers in dementia research, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists have found a new way to treat dementia by sending electrical impulses to specific areas of the brain to enhance the growth of new brain cells. [More]
Research shows that hippocampus is dedicated to memory formation, not to spatial skills

Research shows that hippocampus is dedicated to memory formation, not to spatial skills

In work that reconciles two competing views of brain structures involved in memory and spatial perception, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have conducted experiments that suggest the hippocampus - a small region in the brain's limbic system - is dedicated largely to memory formation and not to spatial skills, such as navigation. [More]
Study sheds light on how brain networks contribute to OCD in children

Study sheds light on how brain networks contribute to OCD in children

A new study by scientists at the Wayne State University School of Medicine demonstrates that communication between some of the brain's most important centers is altered in children with obsessive-compulsive disorder. [More]

New UH research shows how non-invasive brain-machine interface can help control prosthetic hand

A research team from the University of Houston has created an algorithm that allowed a man to grasp a bottle and other objects with a prosthetic hand, powered only by his thoughts. [More]
Blueberries may be effective in treatment for PTSD

Blueberries may be effective in treatment for PTSD

Up to 8 percent of people in the U.S. suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as the result of witnessing or being the victim of a traumatic event. People with PTSD have been in a situation in which they were at risk of death, serious injury or sexual violence or have seen first-hand loved ones faces such threats. They may experience flashbacks, emotional detachment and jumpiness, among other symptoms that affect their ability to function in everyday life. [More]
New study may help decode attention deficit disorders

New study may help decode attention deficit disorders

Sometimes being too focused on a task is not a good thing. During tasks that require our attention, we might become so engrossed in what we are doing that we fail to notice there is a better way to get the job done. [More]
Researchers examine neural synchronization between leaders and their followers

Researchers examine neural synchronization between leaders and their followers

Great leaders are often good communicators. In the process of communication, the relationship between leaders and their followers develops spontaneously according to new research from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig and the State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning and IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research in Beijing. [More]
Brain-somatic-activating mutations in MTOR cause focal cortical dysplasia type II

Brain-somatic-activating mutations in MTOR cause focal cortical dysplasia type II

Epilepsy is a brain disorder that afflicts more than 50 million people worldwide. Many epilepsy patients can control their symptoms through medication, but about 30% suffer from intractable epilepsy and are unable to manage the disease with drugs. Intractable epilepsy causes multiple seizures, permanent mental, physical, and developmental disabilities, and even death. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement