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Emotion regulation distinguishes unipolar and bipolar depression

Emotion regulation distinguishes unipolar and bipolar depression

Patients with bipolar disorder regulate their emotions differently from those with major depressive disorder in both depressed and remitted states, a study shows. [More]
Omega-3 fatty acids improve cognitive flexibility in older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease

Omega-3 fatty acids improve cognitive flexibility in older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease

A study of older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease found that those who consumed more omega-3 fatty acids did better than their peers on tests of cognitive flexibility -- the ability to efficiently switch between tasks -- and had a bigger anterior cingulate cortex, a brain region known to contribute to cognitive flexibility. [More]
Magstim Rapid2 Therapy System receives FDA clearance for treatment of drug resistant MDD

Magstim Rapid2 Therapy System receives FDA clearance for treatment of drug resistant MDD

The Magstim Company Ltd, an innovative and award winning Wales-based medical device manufacturer, has received FDA 510(k) clearance to market its Magstim Rapid2 Therapy System for the treatment of drug resistant Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in the United States. The clearance enables Magstim to significantly increase access to cutting-edge Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) technology for patients and clinicians. [More]
UC Irvine study shows youthful vigor can be restored to adult brains

UC Irvine study shows youthful vigor can be restored to adult brains

They say you can't teach an old dog new tricks. The same can be said of the adult brain. Its connections are hard to change, while in children, novel experiences rapidly mold new connections during critical periods of brain development. [More]
Vagus nerve stimulation effective in inhibiting cortical spreading depression

Vagus nerve stimulation effective in inhibiting cortical spreading depression

A poster presentation at the International Headache Congress in Valencia, Spain reports that VNS inhibits cortical spreading depression (CSD), which is known to be the cause of migraine aura and a trigger for headache. [More]
Allen Institute makes progress in brain research with launch of Allen Cell Types Database

Allen Institute makes progress in brain research with launch of Allen Cell Types Database

The Allen Institute for Brain Science announced today that it is taking the first major scientific step to create a searchable standards database for the brain with the launch of the Allen Cell Types Database. This first release includes information on the location, electrical activity and shape of more than 240 neurons. [More]
Dopamine-producing neurons affect crucial brain functions

Dopamine-producing neurons affect crucial brain functions

Nerve cells that produce dopamine for the purpose of transmitting signals to other cells affect numerous crucial brain functions. [More]
Growth of neuronal and vascular networks is controlled by same signaling molecules

Growth of neuronal and vascular networks is controlled by same signaling molecules

Neurons and blood vessels often traverse the body side by side, a fact observed as early as the 16th century by the Flemish anatomist Andreas Vesalius. Only over the last ten years, however, researchers have discovered that the growth of neuronal and vascular networks is controlled by the same molecules. [More]
Brain protein plays key role in controlling binge drinking

Brain protein plays key role in controlling binge drinking

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered that a brain protein has a key role in controlling binge drinking in animal models. They found that deleting the gene for this protein in mice ramped up alcohol consumption and prevented the brain from signaling the rewarding properties of alcohol. [More]
Malfunction of brain architecture can prompt neuron to make 'early-career' switch

Malfunction of brain architecture can prompt neuron to make 'early-career' switch

Scientists at the Salk Institute have discovered that the role of neurons -- which are responsible for specific tasks in the brain -- is much more flexible than previously believed. [More]

Researchers record moment-by-moment fluctuations in brain signals

Researchers studying how the brain makes decisions have, for the first time, recorded the moment-by-moment fluctuations in brain signals that occur when a monkey making free choices has a change of mind. [More]
Researchers reconstruct 3D models of neuronal networks for studying cortex organization

Researchers reconstruct 3D models of neuronal networks for studying cortex organization

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics (Germany), VU University Amsterdam (Netherlands) and Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience (USA) succeed in reconstructing the neuronal networks that interconnect the elementary units of sensory cortex - cortical columns. [More]
Common electric brain stimulation has significant detrimental effect on IQ scores

Common electric brain stimulation has significant detrimental effect on IQ scores

Using a weak electric current in an attempt to boost brainpower or treat conditions has become popular among scientists and do-it-yourselfers, but a new University of North Carolina School of Medicine study shows that using the most common form of electric brain stimulation had a statistically significant detrimental effect on IQ scores. [More]
Ground-breaking study characterizes early-stage Alzheimer's abnormalities in the intact brain

Ground-breaking study characterizes early-stage Alzheimer's abnormalities in the intact brain

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition that strikes at the heart of what makes us human: the ability to think, to feel, to remember and to communicate with those around us. The tragedy is compounded by the fact that there is currently no cure, no treatment, and no diagnostic method capable of identifying Alzheimer's at its early stages. [More]
New study shows that depression can make your brain go 'fuzzy'

New study shows that depression can make your brain go 'fuzzy'

People with depression or bipolar disorder often feel their thinking ability has gotten "fuzzy", or less sharp than before their symptoms began. Now, researchers have shown in a very large study that effect is indeed real - and rooted in brain activity differences that show up on advanced brain scans. [More]
Electroclinical triggers for repeat MRI in intractable epilepsy identified

Electroclinical triggers for repeat MRI in intractable epilepsy identified

Researchers have outlined the electroclinical features typically associated with bottom-of-sulcus dysplasia, the surgical removal of which often cures epilepsy in affected patients. [More]
Emotion regulation deficits specific to bipolar I disorder

Emotion regulation deficits specific to bipolar I disorder

Emotion regulation deficits associated with bipolar I disorder may not extend to bipolar II disorder, say researchers. [More]

UO researchers uncover how the brain encodes and translates sounds

When people hear the sound of footsteps or the drilling of a woodpecker, the rhythmic structure of the sounds is striking, says Michael Wehr, a professor of psychology at the University of Oregon. [More]

Researchers pinpoint specific brain regions that control defensive and offensive strategies

We often make quick strategic decisions to attack an opponent or defend our position, yet how we make them is not well understood. Now, researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have pinpointed specific brain regions related to this process by examining neural activity in people playing shogi, a Japanese form of chess. [More]
Study provides detailed brain map of language impairments in aphasia after stroke

Study provides detailed brain map of language impairments in aphasia after stroke

The exchange of words, speaking and listening in conversation, may seem unremarkable for most people, but communicating with others is a challenge for people who have aphasia, an impairment of language that often happens after stroke or other brain injury. [More]
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