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New electrical pattern in brains predicts how well individual animals fare in stressful situations

New electrical pattern in brains predicts how well individual animals fare in stressful situations

Some people can handle stressful situations better than others, and it's not all in their genes: Even identical twins show differences in how they respond. [More]
Brains of kids with autism are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance

Brains of kids with autism are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance

The brains of children with autism are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance, according to a new brain-imaging study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Parallel brain circuits associated with opposing emotional reactions

Parallel brain circuits associated with opposing emotional reactions

People choosing between two or more equally positive outcomes experience paradoxical feelings of pleasure and anxiety, feelings associated with activity in different regions of the brain, according to research led by Amitai Shenhav, an associate research scholar at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute at Princeton University. [More]
Melatonin has protective effects on traumatic brain injury-induced cerebral cortex

Melatonin has protective effects on traumatic brain injury-induced cerebral cortex

Traumatic brain injury can cause post-traumatic neurodegenerations with an increase in reactive oxygen species and reactive oxygen species-mediated lipid peroxidation. Melatonin, a non-enzymatic antioxidant and neuroprotective agent, has been shown to counteract oxidative stress-induced pathophysiologic conditions like cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, neuronal excitotoxicity and chronic inflammation. [More]
GW researcher awarded SFARI grant for autism research

GW researcher awarded SFARI grant for autism research

The link between autism and disrupted brain development is an essential part of the puzzle of the disease, and is largely unknown. However, thanks to funding from the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, George Washington University researcher Anthony-Samuel LaMantia, Ph.D. may be able to offer truly integrative and in-depth answers to these key questions in the field of autism research. [More]
Astrocytes may be behind mental disorders, new research reveals

Astrocytes may be behind mental disorders, new research reveals

Astrocytes, the cells that make the background of the brain and support neurons, might be behind mental disorders such as depression and schizophrenia, according to new research by a Portuguese team from the ICVS at the University of Minho. [More]

Trying harder makes it more difficult to learn certain aspects of language, shows study

When it comes to learning languages, adults and children have different strengths. Adults excel at absorbing the vocabulary needed to navigate a grocery store or order food in a restaurant, but children have an uncanny ability to pick up on subtle nuances of language that often elude adults. [More]
Study analyses whether connectivity of infant's brain is related to children's impulsiveness

Study analyses whether connectivity of infant's brain is related to children's impulsiveness

Researchers from the University of Murcia have studied the changes in the brain that are associated with impulsiveness, a personality trait that causes difficulties in inhibiting a response in the face of a stimulus and leads to unplanned actions without considering the negative consequences. [More]
Researchers explore brain estrogens to mitigate learning and memory problems

Researchers explore brain estrogens to mitigate learning and memory problems

New studies being launched by neurobiologist Luke Remage-Healey at the University of Massachusetts Amherst will investigate how estrogens produced in the brains of young birds enhance their ability to learn songs during a critical window during development. [More]
Research leads to better understanding of neurodegenerative, neurodevelopmental diseases

Research leads to better understanding of neurodegenerative, neurodevelopmental diseases

Throughout our lives, our brains adapt to what we learn and memorise. The brain is indeed made up of complex networks of neurons and synapses that are constantly re-configured. [More]
Findings fuel idea that processes of active movement and sensory processing are connected

Findings fuel idea that processes of active movement and sensory processing are connected

A new study by researchers at the University of Oregon published today in the journal Neuron describes a brainstem circuit in mice that may help explain how active movement impacts the way the brain processes sensory information. [More]
SWI provides information about pathophysiological changes of brain after acute hemorrphagic anemia

SWI provides information about pathophysiological changes of brain after acute hemorrphagic anemia

Acute hemorrhagic anemia can decrease blood flow and oxygen supply to brain, and affect its physiological function. Detecting changes in brain function in patients with acute hemorrhagic anemia is helpful for preventing neurological complications and evaluating therapeutic effects. [More]
Drug paraphernalia triggers reward areas of brain differently in marijuana users

Drug paraphernalia triggers reward areas of brain differently in marijuana users

New research from The University of Texas at Dallas demonstrates that drug paraphernalia triggers the reward areas of the brain differently in dependent and non-dependent marijuana users. [More]
Imaging biomarker proposed for Parkinson’s disease

Imaging biomarker proposed for Parkinson’s disease

Reduced off-medication connectivity in the basal ganglia network separates patients with early Parkinson’s disease from healthy controls with high accuracy, preliminary findings suggest. [More]
Study to understand impairments of working memory among patients with schizophrenia

Study to understand impairments of working memory among patients with schizophrenia

The inability to ignore irrelevant stimuli underlies the impaired working memory and cognition often experienced by individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia, reports a new study in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry. [More]
Eye exam for beta-amyloid correlates with levels in brain, detects people with Alzheimer's

Eye exam for beta-amyloid correlates with levels in brain, detects people with Alzheimer's

A decreased ability to identify odors might indicate the development of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, while examinations of the eye could indicate the build-up of beta-amyloid, a protein associated with Alzheimer's, in the brain, according to the results of four research trials reported today at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference- 2014 (AAIC- 2014) in Copenhagen. [More]
Research finding could provide better understanding of severe mental illness

Research finding could provide better understanding of severe mental illness

A neuroscientist at Rutgers University-Newark says the human brain operates much the same whether active or at rest - a finding that could provide a better understanding of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other serious mental health conditions that afflict an estimated 13.6 million Americans. [More]

Findings provide insight into how brain represents innermost feelings

Although feelings are personal and subjective, the human brain turns them into a standard code that objectively represents emotions across different senses, situations and even people, reports a new study by Cornell University neuroscientist Adam Anderson. [More]
Study reveals effect of 3-n-butylphthalide on chronic ischemic stroke

Study reveals effect of 3-n-butylphthalide on chronic ischemic stroke

The pathogenesis of vascular dementia induced by chronic cerebral ischemia is complex, mainly consisting of energy metabolism disorder, oxidative stress injury, neuronal apoptotic cell death and cholinergic nerve dysfunction. [More]
NIH funds Phase II 90-subject pediatric clinical trial at UCLA

NIH funds Phase II 90-subject pediatric clinical trial at UCLA

NeuroSigma, Inc., a California-based life sciences company focused on commercialization of its non-invasive Monarch eTNS System for the treatment of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, today announced that the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded UCLA a grant that funds a Phase II 90-subject pediatric clinical trial at the University of California, Los Angeles focused on the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) with NeuroSigma's external trigeminal nerve stimulation (eTNS) System. [More]