Cox 2 Inhibitor News and Research RSS Feed - Cox 2 Inhibitor News and Research

Cox-2 Inhibitors are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used to relieve pain and inflammation. COX-2 inhibitors are being studied in the prevention of colon polyps, and as anticancer drugs. Also called cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor.

Effective strategy for noninvasive detection of cancer

Molecules that bind and illuminate proteins specific to tumor cells are key to detecting cancer as early as possible. The cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme is just such a protein, as the concentration of COX-2 is greater in cancer cells than in adjacent normal tissues. [More]
High mobility group (HMG) genes and cancer: an interview with Dr. Linda Resar, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

High mobility group (HMG) genes and cancer: an interview with Dr. Linda Resar, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

High mobility group A genes are highly expressed in all aggressive cancers studied to date. These genes encode the high mobility group A (HMGA) proteins. In other words, these genes provide the genetic “code” necessary to produce HMGA proteins. [More]

COX-2 inhibitor extends sunitinib activity in renal cell carcinoma

The effectiveness of sunitinib for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma could be enhanced with the addition of a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, study findings show. [More]
Positive results from CrystalGenomics’ CG100649 Phase 2b OA study

Positive results from CrystalGenomics’ CG100649 Phase 2b OA study

CrystalGenomics, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company headquartered in Korea, has just announced positive results from the Phase 2b osteoarthritis (OA) study of the CG100649, CrystalGenomics' next-generation NSAID candidate. [More]

Decreasing GPA adherence among COX-2 users increases risk of upper GI complications

To relieve pain, arthritis sufferers are prescribed medications that may include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, both of which can irritate the digestive tract. At times additional drugs are co-prescribed with NSAIDs or COX-2 inhibitors to prevent adverse gastrointestinal (GI) effects. [More]
Aspirin may benefit HIV-infected women at risk of cervical cancer

Aspirin may benefit HIV-infected women at risk of cervical cancer

Research conducted by NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center global health investigators and cancer specialists in New York, Qatar and Haiti suggests that aspirin should be evaluated for its ability to prevent development of cervical cancer in HIV-infected women. [More]
NSAIDs like ibuprofen slow the spread of breast cancers

NSAIDs like ibuprofen slow the spread of breast cancers

Published online on Aug. 7, 2011, the journal Nature Medicine reports that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including ibuprofen reduce the severity of postpartum breast cancers in animal models. [More]
Former smokers with lung cancer can benefit from celecoxib treatment

Former smokers with lung cancer can benefit from celecoxib treatment

Celecoxib may emerge as a potent chemopreventive agent for lung cancer, according to a recent study in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Change in diet can reduce cancer risk

Change in diet can reduce cancer risk

Eating a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet may reduce the risk of cancer and slow the growth of tumors already present, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Tragara's apricoxib-erlotinib Phase 2 study data on non-small cell lung cancer presented at ASCO 2011

Tragara's apricoxib-erlotinib Phase 2 study data on non-small cell lung cancer presented at ASCO 2011

Tragara Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that apricoxib in combination with erlotinib demonstrated significant and consistent clinical benefit over erlotinib alone in a clinically relevant subset of biomarker-selected patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had previously failed a platinum-containing regimen for advanced disease. [More]

CrystalGenomics begins enrollment in CG100649 Phase 2b osteoarthritis study

CrystalGenomics, Inc. and CG Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company with 3 clinical stage candidates, has announced that the first patient has been enrolled for a Phase 2b clinical study of CG100649, CrystalGenomics' clinical stage novel NSAID candidate, in patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis. [More]
Anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib reacts with protein and induces liver cancer cells to commit suicide

Anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib reacts with protein and induces liver cancer cells to commit suicide

The anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib, known by the brand name Celebrex, triggers liver cancer cell death by reacting with a protein in a way that makes those cells commit suicide, according to a new study. [More]

Research finds 'no safe window' for painkiller use among heart attack survivors

Even short-term use of some painkillers could be dangerous for people who've had a heart attack, according to research published in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. [More]

New research: Fluid retention may explain drugs' risk of strokes and heart attacks

New research shows that medications which have raised safety concerns over heart attack and stroke risks may not have gotten approval from the Food and Drug Administration if the cardiovascular effects of fluid retention had been better understood. Fluid retention may explain the increased risk of heart attacks and strokes of medications such as Vioxx, Bextra, and Avandia. [More]
Tip sheets provide details on hip and knee fracture treatment

Tip sheets provide details on hip and knee fracture treatment

Patients who wait more than 36 hours for surgery to correct a hip fracture have a 39 percent rate of medical complication and those who wait 48 hours have a 46 percent complication rate. Patients who receive surgical treatment within 24 hours have a lower complication rate of 25 percent and a shorter hospital stay. Each day the surgery was delayed added an additional two days to hospital stay. [More]

Painkillers and heart attack risk

A new study has shown that taking certain commonly used painkillers for long periods or in high doses increases the risk of heart attacks or strokes. The study comes from researchers from Bern University and is published in the British Medical Journal. [More]
Unintended direct conflict between pharmaceutical marketing and public health

Unintended direct conflict between pharmaceutical marketing and public health

Drugs that pharmaceutical companies market most aggressively to physicians and patients tend to offer less benefit and more harm to most patients - a phenomenon described as the "inverse benefit law" in a paper from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. [More]

Patients who consume painkillers may face cardiovascular risk

The drugs include traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as well as new generation anti-inflammatory drugs, known as COX-2 inhibitors. The researchers say that doctors and patients need to be aware that prescription of any anti-inflammatory drug needs to take cardiovascular risk into account. [More]

Exemestane may provide post-surgery option for postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer

Exemestane, an aromatase inhibitor that blocks production of estrogen, may provide another post-surgery option for postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor positive, early-stage breast cancer. [More]

Low-dose diazepam with NS-398 combination has twice the neuroprotective effect of NS-398 alone

Status epilepticus, prolonged seizures, can lead to significant neurological deficits and, rarely, even death. The anticonvulsant diazepam, a first line therapy for the condition, is neuroprotective when administered in high doses within two hours from seizure onset. Researchers at the 64th AES Annual Meeting now report that the combination of low-dose diazepam and NS-398, a COX-2 inhibitor, has twice the neuroprotective effect of NS-398 alone. [More]