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Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Using a new imaging technique, National Institutes of Health researchers have found that the biological machinery that builds DNA can insert molecules into the DNA strand that are damaged as a result of environmental exposures. These damaged molecules trigger cell death that produces some human diseases, according to the researchers. [More]
Scientists identify defects in colossal heart protein which leads to stroke, heart failure

Scientists identify defects in colossal heart protein which leads to stroke, heart failure

The landmark discovery of a tiny defect in a vital heart protein has for the first time enabled heart specialists to accurately pinpoint a therapeutic target for future efforts in developing a drug-based cure for cardiovascular diseases. [More]
Research opens new potential target against enterics

Research opens new potential target against enterics

In research published in Nature Chemical Biology, scientists from RIKEN in Japan have discovered a surprisingly simple mechanism through which enterics can adjust to the very different oxygen environments inside the human gut and outside. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers capture images of protein complex that keeps hearts beating

Johns Hopkins researchers capture images of protein complex that keeps hearts beating

For years, a multidisciplinary team of Johns Hopkins researchers has tracked an elusive creature, a complex of proteins thought to be at fault in some cases of sudden cardiac death. As they report Nov. 5 in the online edition of Nature Communications, they have finally captured images of the complex. [More]
Landmark study provides new insight into function of enzyme related to BRCA1 protein

Landmark study provides new insight into function of enzyme related to BRCA1 protein

A landmark study to be published in the October 30, 2014 print edition of the journal Nature provides new insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast-cancer protein. The study by a team at Penn State University is the first to produce a detailed working image of an enzyme in the Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) -- a group that regulates cell development and is associated with many types of cancer. [More]
Researchers develop protein therapy that may stop cancer growth

Researchers develop protein therapy that may stop cancer growth

A team of Stanford researchers has developed a protein therapy that disrupts the process that causes cancer cells to break away from original tumor sites, travel through the blood stream and start aggressive new growths elsewhere in the body. [More]
Zebrafish may hold key to unlocking a leading cause of respiratory diseases

Zebrafish may hold key to unlocking a leading cause of respiratory diseases

A small freshwater fish found in many tropical aquariums may hold the key to unlocking one of the leading causes of respiratory diseases in humans. [More]
Researchers find new method to measure modified protein structures in biological sample

Researchers find new method to measure modified protein structures in biological sample

Cells regulate protein functions in a wide variety of ways, including by modifying the protein structure. In an instant, a protein can take on another form and perform no or even the "wrong" function: in humans, proteins that fold wrongly can cause serious diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's or cystic fibrosis. [More]
Researchers pave way for development of new generation of chemotherapy drugs

Researchers pave way for development of new generation of chemotherapy drugs

A new mechanism to inhibit proteasomes, protein complexes that are a target for cancer therapy, is the topic of an article published in the journal Chemistry & Biology. [More]
Internal water channels can pave way for novel approaches in drug development

Internal water channels can pave way for novel approaches in drug development

G protein-coupled receptors are the largest class of cell surface receptors in our cells, involved in signal transmission across the cell membrane. [More]
Researchers unravel molecular mechanism of mRNA recognition

Researchers unravel molecular mechanism of mRNA recognition

The information encoded in our genes is translated into proteins, which ultimately mediate biological functions in an organism. [More]
Scientists identify developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces

Scientists identify developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces

Scientists have identified the developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces, a group of soil microbes that produce more than two-thirds of the world's naturally derived antibiotic medicines. [More]
Researchers now have a clear picture of bacterial immune system

Researchers now have a clear picture of bacterial immune system

Bacteria's ability to destroy viruses has long puzzled scientists, but researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they now have a clear picture of the bacterial immune system and say its unique shape is likely why bacteria can so quickly recognize and destroy their assailants. [More]
Laboratories at TSRI investigate antibodies to fight Ebola virus

Laboratories at TSRI investigate antibodies to fight Ebola virus

Laboratories at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) are investigating antibodies to fight Ebola virus, including the three antibodies recently used to treat two American health care workers infected with the Ebola virus. [More]
Researchers uncover 3D structure of neuroreceptor

Researchers uncover 3D structure of neuroreceptor

Neurons are the cells of our brain, spinal cord, and overall nervous system. They form complex networks to communicate with each other through electrical signals that are carried by chemicals. [More]
Rice, Baylor scientists analyze how influenza-related proteins help infect cells

Rice, Baylor scientists analyze how influenza-related proteins help infect cells

A flu virus acts like a Trojan horse as it attacks and infects host cells. Scientists at Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have acquired a clearer view of the well-hidden mechanism involved. [More]
Researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with activity of mutated cancer gene

Researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with activity of mutated cancer gene

UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers have found a molecule that selectively and irreversibly interferes with the activity of a mutated cancer gene common in 30 percent of tumors. [More]
Cancer researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with KRAS gene

Cancer researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with KRAS gene

UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers have found a molecule that selectively and irreversibly interferes with the activity of a mutated cancer gene common in 30 percent of tumors. [More]
Researchers prove that CD27 drug is true alternative against malaria

Researchers prove that CD27 drug is true alternative against malaria

Researchers from the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya · BarcelonaTech (UPC), the Instituto de Química Mèdica (IQM-CSIC) and the University of Glasgow have proved that the CD27 drug is a true alternative against malaria. [More]

Scientists reveal secrets of cell membrane proteins

Rice University scientists have succeeded in analyzing transmembrane protein folding in the same way they study the proteins' free-floating, globular cousins. [More]