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Cancer researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with KRAS gene

Cancer researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with KRAS gene

UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers have found a molecule that selectively and irreversibly interferes with the activity of a mutated cancer gene common in 30 percent of tumors. [More]
Researchers prove that CD27 drug is true alternative against malaria

Researchers prove that CD27 drug is true alternative against malaria

Researchers from the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya · BarcelonaTech (UPC), the Instituto de Química Mèdica (IQM-CSIC) and the University of Glasgow have proved that the CD27 drug is a true alternative against malaria. [More]
Scientists reveal secrets of cell membrane proteins

Scientists reveal secrets of cell membrane proteins

Rice University scientists have succeeded in analyzing transmembrane protein folding in the same way they study the proteins' free-floating, globular cousins. [More]
Researchers reveal molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA

Researchers reveal molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA

The Roquin protein, discovered in 2005, controls T-cell activation and differentiation by regulating the expression of certain mRNAs. In doing so, it helps to guarantee immunological tolerance and prevents immune responses against the body's own structures that can lead to autoimmune disease. [More]
Study to understand molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA to treat autoimmune diseases

Study to understand molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA to treat autoimmune diseases

Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, the Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich (LMU) and the Technische Universität München (TUM) have moved an important step closer to understanding molecular mechanisms of autoimmune diseases. [More]
Scientists reveal structure of protein complex involved in liver and colon cancers

Scientists reveal structure of protein complex involved in liver and colon cancers

A group of scientists from Spain, the UK and the United States has revealed the structure of a protein complex involved in liver and colon cancers. Both of these types of cancer are of significant social and clinical relevance as in 2012 alone, liver cancer was responsible for the second highest mortality rate worldwide, with colon cancer appearing third in the list. [More]
A*STAR scientists pioneered a molecular connection between obesity and diabetes

A*STAR scientists pioneered a molecular connection between obesity and diabetes

Scientists from the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, a research institute under the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, have discovered that obese individuals lack a protein that is essential for regulating blood glucose levels, causing them to face higher risks of developing diabetes. [More]
Researchers give new, unprecedented 3-D view of most important brain receptors

Researchers give new, unprecedented 3-D view of most important brain receptors

Researchers with Oregon Health & Science University's Vollum Institute have given science a new and unprecedented 3-D view of one of the most important receptors in the brain - a receptor that allows us to learn and remember, and whose dysfunction is involved in a wide range of neurological diseases and conditions, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, schizophrenia and depression. [More]
Research reveals key aspect of protein regulation in cells

Research reveals key aspect of protein regulation in cells

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered how an important "on" switch is attached to the machinery that cells rely on to adapt thousands of proteins to meet changing conditions. [More]
Researchers examine why tubulin acetyltransferase is important for brain health

Researchers examine why tubulin acetyltransferase is important for brain health

In a new study, scientists at the National Institutes of Health took a molecular-level journey into microtubules, the hollow cylinders inside brain cells that act as skeletons and internal highways. [More]
Research on viral RNA may help scientists develop treatments against infectious diseases

Research on viral RNA may help scientists develop treatments against infectious diseases

In an article published in the scientific journal Nature, a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues explain how RNA molecules found in certain viruses mimic the shape of other molecules as part of a strategy to 'hijack' the cell and make more viruses. [More]
Researchers move closer to establishing link between GAD65 protein and type 1 diabetes

Researchers move closer to establishing link between GAD65 protein and type 1 diabetes

Researchers are a step closer to establishing the link between a protein with a split personality and type 1 diabetes. [More]
TSRI develops accurate structural map of complex molecular machines in cells

TSRI develops accurate structural map of complex molecular machines in cells

A team led by researchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has used advanced electron microscopy techniques to determine the first accurate structural map of Mediator, one of the largest and most complex "molecular machines" in cells. [More]
Researchers figure out way to disable a part of SARS virus

Researchers figure out way to disable a part of SARS virus

A Purdue University-led research team has figured out how to disable a part of the SARS virus responsible for hiding it from the immune system; a critical step in developing a vaccine against the deadly disease. [More]
UK makes £5.64M investment in most advanced crystallography technology

UK makes £5.64M investment in most advanced crystallography technology

The UK's structural biology community will have access to the most advanced crystallography technology in the world thanks to a - £5.64M investment from UK research funders. [More]
TSRI scientists receive more than $13M to design effective HIV vaccine

TSRI scientists receive more than $13M to design effective HIV vaccine

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has received a grant of more than $13 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease of the National Institutes of Health to study antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)—which will play an essential role in the creation of any effective vaccine against HIV. [More]
TSRI scientists receive $13M grant to create effective vaccine against HIV

TSRI scientists receive $13M grant to create effective vaccine against HIV

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has received a grant of more than $13 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease of the National Institutes of Health to study antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-which will play an essential role in the creation of any effective vaccine against HIV. [More]
TSRI chemists develop correct structure of highly promising anticancer compound

TSRI chemists develop correct structure of highly promising anticancer compound

Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have determined the correct structure of a highly promising anticancer compound approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical trials in cancer patients. [More]
Shark antibodies reveal evolutionary principles of immunoglobulins

Shark antibodies reveal evolutionary principles of immunoglobulins

Custom-tailored antibodies are regarded as promising weapons against a multitude of serious illnesses. Since they can accurately recognize specific structures on the surface of viruses, bacteria or cancer cells, they are already being deployed successfully in cancer diagnostics and therapy, as well as against numerous other diseases. The stability of the sensitive antibodies is a decisive factor in every step, from production and storage to therapeutic application. [More]
Protein Data Bank now contains over 100,000 structures

Protein Data Bank now contains over 100,000 structures

Spanning the globe from the US, UK, and Japan, the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) organization announces that the Protein Data Bank archive now contains more than 100,000 entries. [More]