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Unlocking intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Peter Wright

Unlocking intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Peter Wright

I'm a professor in the Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology at The Scripps Research Institute. I have been performing NMR research on proteins for nearly 40 years. [More]
Structural movie reveals step-by-step creation of chemical that plays important role in some cancers

Structural movie reveals step-by-step creation of chemical that plays important role in some cancers

An international team of scientists led by the University of Liverpool has produced a 'structural movie' revealing the step-by-step creation of an important naturally occurring chemical in the body that plays a role in some cancers. [More]
Screening of protein-based pharmaceuticals, free webinar

Screening of protein-based pharmaceuticals, free webinar

PANalytical, the world’s leading supplier of analytical instrumentation and software for X-ray and related techniques, announces their free webinar on The power of powder - Screening of protein-based pharmaceuticals on 18 February 2016, presented by Irene Margiolaki, assistant professor at the Department of Biology of the University of Patras, Greece and Detlef Beckers, Lead Scientist XRD, PANalytical B.V., The Netherlands [More]
Researchers suggest ways to make TB drugs more efficacious against mutations

Researchers suggest ways to make TB drugs more efficacious against mutations

Biophysicists have discovered why the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB) are naturally somewhat resistant to antibiotics known as fluoroquinolones. Their findings, based on mapping the detailed three-dimensional structure of the drugs interacting with an essential enzyme in the TB germ, also reveal why some TB drugs are more potent than others and suggest how drug developers can make fluoroquinolones more efficacious against mutations that make the lung disease drug resistant. [More]
Scientists find new way to re-engineer body’s immune system to target cancer

Scientists find new way to re-engineer body’s immune system to target cancer

Scientists have demonstrated a new way of re-engineering the body’s immune system to target cancer, paving the way for a new generation of drugs, unprecedented in safety and effectiveness. [More]
Discoveries could lead to development of novel therapies to prevent C. diff infection

Discoveries could lead to development of novel therapies to prevent C. diff infection

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have obtained the crystal structure of a toxin from the bacterium Clostridium difficile ("C. diff") -- the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in the United States. [More]
Scripps biologist describes major advancement in flu vaccine research

Scripps biologist describes major advancement in flu vaccine research

Every fall, millions of people roll up their sleeves to get a flu shot. Up to 20 percent of the population gets the flu and more than 200,000 people are hospitalized with flu complications each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While seasonal vaccines provide some protection, they are not always effective because the strains of influenza virus in the vaccine may not be well matched to the flu viruses circulating that year. So researchers are searching for a way to develop a more universal vaccine that would be effective against any variety of influenza. [More]
New study improves understanding of metal-based chemotherapy drugs

New study improves understanding of metal-based chemotherapy drugs

What is the mechanism of action of metal-based chemotherapy drugs (the most widely used for treating common cancers like testicular or ovarian cancer)? How can we improve their effect and reduce their toxicity? A new study combining experiments and theory has broadened our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of these active drugs to help experimentalists devising increasingly effective drugs with fewer side effects. [More]

Scientists outline molecular blueprints of tiny cellular 'nanomachine'

Scientists have drawn up molecular blueprints of a tiny cellular ‘nanomachine’, whose evolution is an extraordinary feat of nature, by using one of the brightest X-ray sources on Earth. [More]
Researchers elucidate structure of mTORC1 protein

Researchers elucidate structure of mTORC1 protein

For a long time it has been known that the protein TOR - Target of Rapamycin - controls cell growth and is involved in the development of diseases such as cancer and diabetes. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum together with scientists from ETH Zurich have now examined the structure of mammalian TOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in more detail. [More]
New funding supports research on new and improved drug treatments for tuberculosis, malaria

New funding supports research on new and improved drug treatments for tuberculosis, malaria

University of Toronto and McGill University scientists are leading an international partnership to discover new and improved drug treatments for tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases -- thanks to a contribution from Merck Canada Inc., as well as an additional $5 million supplement to a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. [More]
TSRI-led study shows how different drugs regulate protein linked to asthma, obesity and diabetes

TSRI-led study shows how different drugs regulate protein linked to asthma, obesity and diabetes

A new study, led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, shows how different pharmaceutical drugs hit either the "on" or "off" switch of a signaling protein linked to asthma, obesity and type 2 diabetes. [More]
Scientists create detailed image of deadly toxin linked to bacterial pneumonia, meningitis, septicaemia

Scientists create detailed image of deadly toxin linked to bacterial pneumonia, meningitis, septicaemia

Scientists from the University of Leicester have for the first time created a detailed image of a toxin - called pneumolysin - associated with deadly infections such as bacterial pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia. [More]
Discovery could offer clues to how some viruses control expression of genetic material

Discovery could offer clues to how some viruses control expression of genetic material

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and the University of Michigan have produced the first image of an important human protein as it binds with ribonucleic acid (RNA), a discovery that could offer clues to how some viruses, including HIV, control expression of their genetic material. [More]
University of Leicester awarded BBSRC grant to explore three key areas that impact human health

University of Leicester awarded BBSRC grant to explore three key areas that impact human health

The University of Leicester has been awarded over £1.5 million in order to advance knowledge and understanding in three key areas that impact on health. [More]

Griffith University uncovers first 3-D image of protein linked to cancer spread

Griffith University's Institute for Glycomics has made scientific history by determining the first three-dimensional image of a protein linked to the spread of cancer. [More]
Study suggests potential new way to block cancer-causing gene

Study suggests potential new way to block cancer-causing gene

A new study suggests a potential new way to block one of the most common cancer-causing genes, without causing severe side effects. [More]
Research shows deep-sea bacteria could help neutralize atmospheric greenhouse gases

Research shows deep-sea bacteria could help neutralize atmospheric greenhouse gases

A type of bacteria plucked from the bottom of the ocean could be put to work neutralizing large amounts of industrial carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere, a group of University of Florida researchers has found. [More]
Ground-breaking discovery helps scientists view DNA damage with crystal clarity

Ground-breaking discovery helps scientists view DNA damage with crystal clarity

Scientists have developed a new technique for looking at the initial steps of DNA oxidation – a process which can lead to DNA damage, mutations and cancers. The breakthrough, which uses DNA in crystals, should help related research in the fields of cancer medicine and drug development. [More]
OSU discovery sheds new light on how proteins fold

OSU discovery sheds new light on how proteins fold

Biochemists at Oregon State University have made a fundamental discovery about protein structure that sheds new light on how proteins fold, which is one of the most basic processes of life. [More]
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