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Natural protein fragment produced in the brain can inhibit enzyme implicated in Alzheimer's disease

Natural protein fragment produced in the brain can inhibit enzyme implicated in Alzheimer's disease

For the first time, UCLA researchers have shown that a natural protein fragment produced in the brain can act as an inhibitor of a key enzyme implicated in the onset of Alzheimer's disease, a finding that could lead to the development of new drugs to treat the disease. [More]
Vital molecular mechanism in plants has similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans

Vital molecular mechanism in plants has similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans

Scientists at Van Andel Research Institute have revealed an important molecular mechanism in plants that has significant similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans, which are closely linked to early embryonic development and to diseases such as cancer. [More]
NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

Christopher Colbert, assistant professor of biochemistry at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has received a $348,000 grant award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health to conduct research on structure-function relationships of iron transport and transcriptional regulation in Gram-negative bacteria. [More]
Umeå University researchers capture and describe 'invisible' protein structure

Umeå University researchers capture and describe 'invisible' protein structure

A research group at Umeå University in Sweden has managed to capture and describe a protein structure that, until now, has been impossible to study. The discovery lays the base for developing designed enzymes as catalysts to new chemical reactions for instance in biotechnological applications. [More]
Imaging proteasome complex helps show target site for potential cancer drugs

Imaging proteasome complex helps show target site for potential cancer drugs

Scientists have pioneered the use of a high-powered imaging technique to picture in exquisite detail one of the central proteins of life - a cellular recycling unit with a role in many diseases. [More]
Domainex’s new integrated bioassay service platform accelerates progression of drug discovery projects

Domainex’s new integrated bioassay service platform accelerates progression of drug discovery projects

Domainex Ltd, a private drug discovery service company, today announces that it is launching an integrated bioassay service platform, BioassayBuilder. [More]
HIV capsid protein plays crucial role in the virus' life cycle

HIV capsid protein plays crucial role in the virus' life cycle

HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, is the retrovirus that leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or AIDS. Globally, about 35 million people are living with HIV, which constantly adapts and mutates creating challenges for researchers. Now, scientists at the University of Missouri are gaining a clearer idea of what a key protein in HIV looks like, which will help explain its vital role in the virus' life cycle. [More]
New study reveals key part of Ebola virus life cycle at higher resolution than ever before

New study reveals key part of Ebola virus life cycle at higher resolution than ever before

A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) reveals a key part of the Ebola virus life cycle at a higher resolution than ever before. The research sheds light on how Ebola virus assembles—and how researchers might stop the often-fatal infection. [More]
New research sheds light on molecular architecture of receptors linked to many brain diseases

New research sheds light on molecular architecture of receptors linked to many brain diseases

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have teamed up with several other institutions and pharmaceutical companies, including the University of Southern California (USC), San Diego's Receptos Inc. and Japanese company Ono Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., to publish the first 3D structures of a receptor implicated in many diseases of the brain and in normal physiology throughout the body. [More]

Biochemists devise snappy new technique for blueprinting cell membrane proteins

Biochemists from Trinity College Dublin have devised a new technique that will make the difficult but critical job of blueprinting certain proteins considerably faster, cheaper and easier. [More]

Berkeley Lab offers 'on-demand' X-rays

Consumers are now in the era of "on-demand" entertainment, in which they have access to the books, music and movies they want thanks to the internet. Likewise, scientists who use synchrotron light sources are welcoming an era of "on-demand" X-rays, in which they have access to the light beams they want thanks to a technique developed at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). [More]
TSRI scientists map out protein structure involved in cellular function, nervous system development

TSRI scientists map out protein structure involved in cellular function, nervous system development

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute, working closely with researchers at the National Institutes of Health, have mapped out the structure of an important protein involved in cellular function and nervous system development. [More]
Two world-renowned scientists receive Poland-U.S. Science Award

Two world-renowned scientists receive Poland-U.S. Science Award

World-renowned scientists -- Prof. Mariusz Jaskólski of Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland, and Dr. Alexander Wlodawer of the National Cancer Institute, USA -- are the first winners of the Poland-U.S. Science Award granted jointly by the Foundation for Polish Science and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world's largest scientific association. [More]
New pre-validated fluorinated fragment library boosts drug screening efficiency

New pre-validated fluorinated fragment library boosts drug screening efficiency

Researchers engaged in drug discovery can now benefit from a new library of fluorinated compounds with superior drug-like characteristics... [More]
Researchers reveal molecular structure of cytotoxin from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

Researchers reveal molecular structure of cytotoxin from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

Researchers from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio today revealed the molecular structure of the cytotoxin from Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a widespread, highly contagious bacterium that infects the lungs. [More]
NIH awards $2.1 million grant to counter antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria

NIH awards $2.1 million grant to counter antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria

The National Institutes of Health has awarded Dr. Walter Fast, associate professor of medicinal chemistry at The University of Texas at Austin's College of Pharmacy, a four-year $2.1 million grant to develop small-molecules that counter antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. If successful, the research could lead to new drugs for treating bacterial infections that are resistant to most antibiotics. [More]
Saccharin could potentially lead to development of drugs for difficult-to-treat cancers

Saccharin could potentially lead to development of drugs for difficult-to-treat cancers

Saccharin, the artificial sweetener that is the main ingredient in Sweet 'N Low, Sweet Twin and Necta, could do far more than just keep our waistlines trim. According to new research, this popular sugar substitute could potentially lead to the development of drugs capable of combating aggressive, difficult-to-treat cancers with fewer side effects. [More]

Winners of first SSPC National Crystal Growing Competition announced

The Synthesis and Solid State Pharmaceutical Centre today (19th March 2015) announced the winners of its first SSPC National Crystal Growing Competition, which was launched as part of Science Week in November 2014, to celebrate the International Year of Crystallography. The SSPC National Crystal Growing Competition was open to primary and post-primary schools from across Ireland. [More]
New research identifies promising drug therapy target for breast cancer

New research identifies promising drug therapy target for breast cancer

The genome of a cell is under constant attack, suffering DNA damage that requires an army of repair mechanisms to keep the cell healthy and alive. Understanding the behavior of the enzymes defending these assaults helps determine how - and where - cancer gets its foothold and flourishes. [More]
Weak spots in ebola’s defenses: an interview with Dr. Andrew Ward

Weak spots in ebola’s defenses: an interview with Dr. Andrew Ward

There are hundreds of other antibodies against Ebola that we are in the process of imaging using the electron microscope. We are looking for new sites of vulnerability as well as subtle differences in the way the known sites are attacked. In particular we are looking for antibodies that the virus is unlikely to escape from when it mutates. [More]
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