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Researchers learn about the impact invasive zebra mussels have on risk of algae blooms

Researchers learn about the impact invasive zebra mussels have on risk of algae blooms

Researchers at Grand Valley State University's Annis Water Resources Institute are learning more about the impact invasive zebra mussels and native aquatic insect larvae have on the risk of algae blooms in two West Michigan lakes. The results of the research will be published in the journal Oikos. [More]
Imposter Amino Acid Mimics Serine, Kinks Neuroproteins, Prompts Tangling

Imposter Amino Acid Mimics Serine, Kinks Neuroproteins, Prompts Tangling

... [More]
Microcystins in drinking water: an interview with Rohan Thakur, VP of Bruker CAM

Microcystins in drinking water: an interview with Rohan Thakur, VP of Bruker CAM

Microcystins have become the generic name for the toxins produced from blue-green, algae which can bloom in surface water impoundments, slow moving streams and rivers. [More]
DFG to establish 11 Collaborative Research Centres in Jan 2013

DFG to establish 11 Collaborative Research Centres in Jan 2013

‚ÄčThe Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) will establish eleven Collaborative Research Centres (CRCs) as of 1 January 2013. This was decided by the responsible Grants Committee during its fall session in Bonn. [More]
Microcystin present in Canadian lakes in every province

Microcystin present in Canadian lakes in every province

Nutrient pollution, one of the greatest threats to our freshwater resources, is responsible for the algal blooms that blanket our lakes and waterways in summer months. Large blooms of cyanobacteria ('blue green algae') can cause fish kills, increase the cost of drinking water treatment, devalue shoreline properties, and pose health risks to people, pets, and wildlife. A new paper just published in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences shows that microcystin, a toxin produced by cyanobacteria, is present in Canadian lakes in every province. [More]
Global warming may stimulate growth of cyanobacteria

Global warming may stimulate growth of cyanobacteria

Cyanobacteria are among the most primitive living beings, aged over 3,500 million years old. These aquatic microorganisms helped to oxygenate the earth-atmosphere. At present their populations are increasing in size without stopping. It appears that global warming may be behind the rise in their numbers and may also lead toan increase in the amount of toxins produced by some of these populations. [More]

Cyanobacterium produces compounds that could treat chronic inflammatory conditions

A seaweed considered a threat to the healthy growth of coral reefs in Hawaii may possess the ability to produce substances that could one day treat human diseases, a new study led by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego has revealed. [More]
Gene function preserved despite structural differences in the DNA

Gene function preserved despite structural differences in the DNA

Chloroplasts, the plant cell's green solar power generators, were once living beings in their own right. This changed about one billion years ago, when they were swallowed up but not digested by larger cells. Since then, they have lost much of their autonomy. [More]
BGSU chemist uses supercomputer to help unlock benefits of toxic bacteria

BGSU chemist uses supercomputer to help unlock benefits of toxic bacteria

Blue-green algae is causing havoc in Midwestern lakes saturated with agricultural run-off, but researchers in a northwest Ohio lab are using supercomputers to study a closely related strain of the toxic cyanobacteria to harness its beneficial properties. [More]
Increase in human activity threatens natural aquatic ecosystems in Tanzania

Increase in human activity threatens natural aquatic ecosystems in Tanzania

An increase in human activity is posing a threat to natural aquatic ecosystems in Tanzania and contributing to environmental damage and ecological changes. Doctoral research carried out by Hezron Emmanuel Nonga shows that agriculture and livestock farming leads to eutrophication in lakes and the proliferation of cyanobacteria which produce microcystins. [More]
Researchers modify toxic chemical of marine cycyanobacteria to treat colon cancer

Researchers modify toxic chemical of marine cycyanobacteria to treat colon cancer

University of Florida researchers have modified a toxic chemical produced by tiny marine microbes and successfully deployed it against laboratory models of colon cancer. [More]
Scientists decipher genome of tropical marine organism

Scientists decipher genome of tropical marine organism

An international team of researchers led by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego has deciphered the genome of a tropical marine organism known to produce substances potentially useful against human diseases. [More]
Researchers find blue-green algae may be responsible for producing estrogen-like compound in water

Researchers find blue-green algae may be responsible for producing estrogen-like compound in water

University of Tennessee, Knoxville, researchers have found that blue-green algae may be responsible for producing an estrogen-like compound in the environment which could disrupt the normal activity of reproductive hormones and adversely affect fish, plants and human health. [More]

Unrecognized substances released by algae blooms may act as endocrine disruptors

Scientists are reporting for the first time that previously unrecognized substances released by algae blooms have the potential to act as endocrine disruptors, which can interfere with the normal activity of reproductive hormones. The effect is not caused by microcystin toxins, long recognized as potentially harmful to humans and aquatic animals, but as yet unidentified substances. [More]
Largazole appears to be an ideal blueprint for developing new drugs against bone diseases

Largazole appears to be an ideal blueprint for developing new drugs against bone diseases

One of Mother Nature's latest gifts to medical science is stirring excitement with the discovery that the substance - obtained from a coral-reef inhabiting cyanobacterium - appears to be an ideal blueprint for developing new drugs for serious fractures, osteoporosis, and other bone diseases. [More]

Earthy or musty odors along with cyanobacteria may indicate presence of harmful cyanotoxins in lakes

Earthy or musty odors, along with visual evidence of blue-green algae, also known as cyanobacteria, may serve as a warning that harmful cyanotoxins are present in lakes or reservoirs. In a newly published USGS study of cyanobacterial blooms in Midwest lakes, taste-and-odor compounds were found almost every time cyanotoxins were found, indicating odor may serve as a warning that harmful toxins are present. [More]
Study on cyanobacteria helps understand anesthetic actions

Study on cyanobacteria helps understand anesthetic actions

Experiments in one of the oldest forms of life on Earth are helping to answer basic questions about how general anesthesia works, according to a study in the January issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). [More]
Brain's SCN is the master clock that synchronizes other biological clocks in the body

Brain's SCN is the master clock that synchronizes other biological clocks in the body

Alexis Webb enters a small room at Washington University in St. Louis with walls, floor and ceiling painted dark green, shuts the door, turns off the lights and bends over a microscope in a black box draped with black cloth. Through the microscope, she can see a single nerve cell on a glass cover slip glowing dimly. [More]

New compound discovered by Scripps scientists offers a novel template for drug development

Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and their colleagues at Creighton University have deciphered the highly unusual molecular structure of a naturally produced, ocean-based compound that is giving new understanding of the function of mammalian nerve cells. [More]
Free-living microalgae be used as broad-spectrum automated biosensor systems for continuous monitoring of drinking water

Free-living microalgae be used as broad-spectrum automated biosensor systems for continuous monitoring of drinking water

A method to detect contaminants in municipal water supplies has undergone further refinements by two Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers whose findings are published on line in Water Environment Research. [More]