Cyclophosphamide News and Research RSS Feed - Cyclophosphamide News and Research

Cyclophosphamide is a drug that is used to treat many types of cancer and is being studied in the treatment of other types of cancer. It is also used to treat some types of kidney disease in children. Cyclophosphamide attaches to DNA in cells and may kill cancer cells. It is a type of alkylating agent. Also called CTX and Cytoxan.

Cyclophosphamide is a synthetic alkylating agent chemically related to the nitrogen mustards with antineoplastic and immunosuppressive activities. In the liver, cyclophosphamide is converted to the active metabolites aldophosphamide and phosphoramide mustard, which bind to DNA, thereby inhibiting DNA replication and initiating cell death.
APHON announces recipients of 2014 APHON Membership Awards

APHON announces recipients of 2014 APHON Membership Awards

The Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses announced the recipients of the 2014 APHON Membership Awards at its 38th Annual Conference and Exhibit, held September 4-6 in Portland, OR. APHON Membership Awards recognize members who have shown outstanding achievement in their field. [More]
Eisai, Helsinn Group announce FDA approval of AKYNZEO for prevention of CINV

Eisai, Helsinn Group announce FDA approval of AKYNZEO for prevention of CINV

Helsinn Group and Eisai Inc. announced today that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved AKYNZEO® for the prevention of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting associated with initial and repeat courses of cancer chemotherapy, including, but not limited to, highly emetogenic chemotherapy. [More]
Cyclophosphamide drug can eliminate life-threatening immune response after bone marrow transplants

Cyclophosphamide drug can eliminate life-threatening immune response after bone marrow transplants

Johns Hopkins and other cancer researchers report that a very short course of a chemotherapy drug, called cyclophosphamide, not only can prevent a life-threatening immune response in some bone marrow transplant recipients, but also can eliminate such patients' need for the usual six months of immune suppression medicines commonly prescribed to prevent severe forms of this immune response. [More]
Study could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer

Study could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer

William M. Sikov, a medical oncologist in the Breast Health Center and associate director for clinical research in the Program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, served as study chair and lead author for a recently-published major national study that could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that disproportionately affects younger women. [More]
Johnson & Johnson sales increase 9.1% to $19.5 billion in second quarter 2014

Johnson & Johnson sales increase 9.1% to $19.5 billion in second quarter 2014

Johnson & Johnson today announced sales of $19.5 billion for the second quarter of 2014, an increase of 9.1% as compared to the second quarter of 2013. Operational results increased 9.4% and the negative impact of currency was 0.3%. [More]
Janssen seeks expanded approval of VELCADE from EU for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Janssen seeks expanded approval of VELCADE from EU for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Janssen-Cilag International NV today announced its submission of a type II variation to the European Medicines Agency to expand the label for VELCADE (bortezomib) to include its use, in combination with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and prednisone, for the treatment of adult patients with previously untreated Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL). [More]
Sclerosis patients treated with HSCT experience better long-term event-free survival

Sclerosis patients treated with HSCT experience better long-term event-free survival

Among patients with a severe, life-threatening type of sclerosis, treatment with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), compared to intravenous infusion of the chemotherapeutic drug cyclophosphamide, was associated with an increased treatment-related risk of death in the first year, but better long-term survival, according to a study in the June 25 issue of JAMA. [More]
New vaccine reprograms pancreatic tumors and makes them vulnerable to immunotherapy

New vaccine reprograms pancreatic tumors and makes them vulnerable to immunotherapy

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed and tested a vaccine that triggered the growth of immune cell nodules within pancreatic tumors, essentially reprogramming these intractable cancers and potentially making them vulnerable to immune-based therapies. [More]
Investigators study new cancer immunotherapy to help patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

Investigators study new cancer immunotherapy to help patients with advanced pancreatic cancer

Medical investigators at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare are studying a new cancer immunotherapy to see if it can successfully help patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. [More]
CRS-207 and chemotherapy combination Phase 1b trial data for unresectable MPM presented at ASCO 2014

CRS-207 and chemotherapy combination Phase 1b trial data for unresectable MPM presented at ASCO 2014

Aduro BioTech, Inc., a clinical stage biotechnology company, today announced the presentation of safety and efficacy data from a Phase 1b clinical trial of its novel immunotherapy CRS-207 in combination with standard chemotherapy in patients with unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma. [More]
New understanding of toxicity levels of chemotherapy regimens used for early stage breast cancer

New understanding of toxicity levels of chemotherapy regimens used for early stage breast cancer

Oncologists now have a new understanding of the toxicity levels of specific chemotherapy regimens used for women with early stage breast cancer, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Novel treatment strategy during transplantation surgery could spare patients from rejection

Novel treatment strategy during transplantation surgery could spare patients from rejection

Organ-transplant recipients often reject donated organs, but a new, two-pronged strategy developed by UC San Francisco researchers to specifically weaken immune responses that target transplanted tissue has shown promise in controlled experiments on mice. [More]
Pharmacyclics total revenue for fourth quarter 2013 increases 113% to $123.6 million

Pharmacyclics total revenue for fourth quarter 2013 increases 113% to $123.6 million

Pharmacyclics, Inc. today reported financial results and recent developments for the quarter and year ended December 31, 2013. [More]
Matching the right tumor with the right drug

Matching the right tumor with the right drug

There are three common drugs for advanced ovarian cancer: paclitaxel, cyclophosphamide, and topotecan. Like a shell game, if you pick the right drug a patient is likely to respond. And, unfortunately, picking the wrong drug can lead to treatment failure. As reported in this month's issue of the journal PLoS ONE, a University of Colorado Cancer Center and University of Virginia study used a sophisticated model of ovarian cancer genetics to match the right tumor with the right drug. Patients who were matched in this way lived an average 21 months longer than patients who were not matched. [More]
New study reveals way to combat drug-resistant tumors

New study reveals way to combat drug-resistant tumors

Cancer drugs that recruit antibodies from the body's own immune system to help kill tumors have shown much promise in treating several types of cancer. However, after initial success, the tumors often return. [More]
Immunotherapy maintenance shows promise in NSCLC

Immunotherapy maintenance shows promise in NSCLC

Results from a phase III trial have shown that tecemotide is no more effective than placebo as maintenance therapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. [More]
NICE approves MabThera for treating severe forms of GPA and MPA

NICE approves MabThera for treating severe forms of GPA and MPA

Today the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has approved the use of MabThera for two potentially life-threatening auto-immune diseases, GPA and MPA, which result in the inflammation and damage of small blood vessels and frequently involve multiple organs. The two diseases affect over 13,000 people in the UK and are characterised by the breaking down of specific areas of tissue in the body that, if not treated, can lead to organ damage, organ failure and even death. [More]
Adding drug to presurgery chemotherapy improves results for women with triple-negative breast cancer

Adding drug to presurgery chemotherapy improves results for women with triple-negative breast cancer

The I-SPY 2 trial, an innovative, multidrug, phase II breast cancer trial, has yielded positive results with the first drug to complete testing in the trial. Adding the chemotherapy carboplatin and the molecularly targeted drug veliparib to standard presurgery chemotherapy improved outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer, according to results from the I-SPY 2 trial presented here at the 2013 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 10-14. [More]
Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes may be good biomarker of response to trastuzumab in breast cancer

Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes may be good biomarker of response to trastuzumab in breast cancer

Women with HER2-positive breast cancer who had the highest levels of immune cells in their tumors gained the most benefit from presurgery treatment with chemotherapy and trastuzumab, according to results presented here at the 2013 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 10-14. [More]
New drug combination therapy effective for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer

New drug combination therapy effective for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer

Combining the chemotherapy drugs docetaxel and carboplatin with the HER2-targeted therapy trastuzumab was identified to be an ideal postsurgery treatment option for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer, regardless of tumor size and whether or not disease has spread to the lymph nodes, according to results from the BETH study presented here at the 2013 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 10-14. [More]