Deafness News and Research RSS Feed - Deafness News and Research

Computational biologists develop program for easy diagnosis of hereditary illnesses

Computational biologists develop program for easy diagnosis of hereditary illnesses

In the case of a cough or a sore throat, the doctor can usually diagnose a common cold immediately. However, the diagnosis of hereditary illnesses like cystic fibrosis, which affects the metabolism, or Huntington's disease, which leads to cognitive decline, is much more complex. [More]
New research reveals how expectations about odors can influence symptoms of asthma

New research reveals how expectations about odors can influence symptoms of asthma

New research from the Monell Center reveals that simply believing that an odor is potentially harmful can increase airway inflammation in asthmatics for at least 24 hours following exposure. The findings highlight the role that expectations can play in health-related outcomes. [More]
Researchers propose ‘microbiome cloud model’ to understand variation in individual's microbiome composition

Researchers propose ‘microbiome cloud model’ to understand variation in individual's microbiome composition

The Human Microbiome Project (HMP) is a global initiative to identify and characterize the microorganisms present at multiple sites in the human body. [More]
Iodine supplement can reduce central foveal swelling in RP patients with CME

Iodine supplement can reduce central foveal swelling in RP patients with CME

Cystoid macular edema (CME) is a common complication of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a family of retinal diseases in which patients typically lose night and side vision first and then develop impaired central vision. CME can also decrease central vision. [More]
Researchers receive $2.098 million grant to study recovery of language after stroke

Researchers receive $2.098 million grant to study recovery of language after stroke

An interdisciplinary group of researchers at the University of Arizona has been awarded a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study language abilities in patients recovering from a stroke. [More]
Investigators identify gene that underlies devastating autoinflammatory condition in children

Investigators identify gene that underlies devastating autoinflammatory condition in children

Investigators have identified a gene that underlies a very rare but devastating autoinflammatory condition in children. Several existing drugs have shown therapeutic potential in laboratory studies, and one is currently being studied in children with the disease, which the researchers named STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI). [More]
Integrated therapies can reduce depression by half among people with low vision due to AMD

Integrated therapies can reduce depression by half among people with low vision due to AMD

The first clinical trial to examine integrated low vision and mental health treatment has shown that the approach can reduce the incidence of depression by half among people with low vision due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). [More]
Galderma's trifarotene molecule gets FDA Orphan Drug Designation for treatment of congenital ichthyosis

Galderma's trifarotene molecule gets FDA Orphan Drug Designation for treatment of congenital ichthyosis

Galderma announces that the U.S. FDA granted Orphan Drug Designation status for the company's trifarotene molecule for the treatment of congenital ichthyosis. Based on this decision, Galderma plans to implement a clinical development plan, reinforcing its commitment to exploring new treatment options for rare diseases, as well as meeting the needs of all patients with skin diseases over the course of their lives. [More]
Exome sequencing improves diagnosis of mitochondrial disease

Exome sequencing improves diagnosis of mitochondrial disease

Use of exome sequencing improved the ability to identify the underlying gene mutations in patients with biochemically defined defects affecting multiple mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (enzymes that are involved in basic energy production), according to a study in the July 2 issue of JAMA. [More]
NEI researchers describe functions of gene responsible for anchoring cilia

NEI researchers describe functions of gene responsible for anchoring cilia

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have described the functions of a gene responsible for anchoring cilia - sensory hair-like extensions present on almost every cell of the body. [More]
Autistic-like behaviors linked with disruption of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli gene

Autistic-like behaviors linked with disruption of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli gene

Autistic-like behaviors and decreased cognitive ability may be associated with disruption of the function of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) gene. [More]
Reducing smoking and avoiding passive exposure to tobacco smoke may reduce risk of hearing loss

Reducing smoking and avoiding passive exposure to tobacco smoke may reduce risk of hearing loss

Giving up or reducing smoking and avoiding passive exposure to tobacco smoke may reduce your risk of hearing loss, new research shows. [More]
Interaction of stress and taste systems could help explain stress-related eating

Interaction of stress and taste systems could help explain stress-related eating

According to new research from the Monell Center, receptors for stress-activated hormones have been localized in oral taste cells responsible for detection of sweet, umami, and bitter. The findings suggest that these hormones, known as glucocorticoids, may act directly on taste receptor cells under conditions of stress to affect how these cells respond to sugars and certain other taste stimuli. [More]
Research reveals pattern of neurocognitive risks in children with cochlear implants

Research reveals pattern of neurocognitive risks in children with cochlear implants

Children with profound deafness who receive a cochlear implant had as much as five times the risk of having delays in areas of working memory, controlled attention, planning and conceptual learning as children with normal hearing, according to Indiana University research published May 22 in the Journal of the American Medical Association Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery. [More]

Researchers explore hair cells of inner ear to reverse hearing loss

The ability to discern pitch - to hear the difference between "cat," "bat" and "hat," for example - hinges on remarkable gradations in specialized cells within the inner ear. [More]
New technique can predict which stroke victims will benefit from clot-busting drugs

New technique can predict which stroke victims will benefit from clot-busting drugs

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have developed a technique that can predict — with 95 percent accuracy — which stroke victims will benefit from intravenous, clot-busting drugs and which will suffer dangerous and potentially lethal bleeding in the brain. [More]
Free educational event for patients with Graves' disease and thyroid eye disease

Free educational event for patients with Graves' disease and thyroid eye disease

The Massachusetts Eye and Ear and the Graves' Disease & Thyroid Foundation will host a free educational event for patients living with Graves' disease and thyroid eye disease on Saturday, May 10 from 8:30 a.m. to noon at Mass. Eye and Ear's Meltzer Auditorium, 3rd floor, 243 Charles Street, Boston, Mass., 02114. [More]

Deafness Support Network welcomes planned reforms to GP surgeries

The Northwest’s leading deafness charity Deafness Support Network, has welcomed David Cameron’s recent announcement of planned reforms to GP surgeries, suggesting it could change the lives of more than ten million people in the UK who are deaf or hard of hearing. [More]

Aston University tackles 'glue ear' problem with hearing test app

Aston University is tackling the problem of 'glue ear' in children with a hearing test app for any concerned families. [More]
Researchers find potential way to ease physical damage of numerous genetic disorders

Researchers find potential way to ease physical damage of numerous genetic disorders

Duke Medicine researchers studying tiny, antennae-like structures called cilia have found a potential way to ease some of the physical damage of numerous genetic disorders that result when these essential cellular components are defective. [More]