Diabetes Insipidus News and Research RSS Feed - Diabetes Insipidus News and Research

Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare disease that causes frequent urination. The large volume of urine is diluted, mostly water. To make up for lost water, a person with DI may feel the need to drink large amounts and is likely to urinate frequently, even at night, which can disrupt sleep and, on occasion, cause bedwetting. Because of the excretion of abnormally large volumes of dilute urine, people with DI may quickly become dehydrated if they do not drink enough water. Children with DI may be irritable or listless and may have fever, vomiting, or diarrhea. Milder forms of DI can be managed by drinking enough water, usually between 2 and 2.5 liters a day. DI severe enough to endanger a person’s health is rare.
Researchers discover new molecular mechanism to prevent edema formation

Researchers discover new molecular mechanism to prevent edema formation

Researchers of the Max Delbr-ck Center for Molecular Medicine and the Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology in Berlin-Buch, Germany, have now detected a substance that can prevent the accumulation of fluid in body tissue and thus edema formation. [More]
Diabetes tests: an interview with Dr. Danielle Stowasser

Diabetes tests: an interview with Dr. Danielle Stowasser

Diabetes is a serious condition that causes high levels of glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which are lifelong conditions, and gestational diabetes, which only occurs in women during pregnancy. [More]
Diabetes alone may cost a sixth of total NHS budget by 2035: Report

Diabetes alone may cost a sixth of total NHS budget by 2035: Report

A new report warns that diabetes will cost the NHS more than a sixth of its entire budget by 2035. The disease accounts for 10 per cent (£9.8 billion) of NHS spending, but this is projected to rise to £16.9 billion over the next 25 years, or 17 per cent of the health service's funds. There are around 3.8 million people living with diabetes in the UK and this is expected to increase to 6.25 million in just over two decades. [More]
Blood test to diagnose depression in adolescents

Blood test to diagnose depression in adolescents

Researchers have developed a blood test that can diagnose depression in teens, a step they hope will lead to a better way to identify the disorder in young people. At present diagnosing depression depends entirely on a patient's willingness to report symptoms. For teens, the diagnosis is particularly challenging, given the natural emotional ups and downs of adolescence. [More]
Thousands of diabetes-related deaths could be avoided with better care: UK Report

Thousands of diabetes-related deaths could be avoided with better care: UK Report

According to a new report up to 24,000 diabetes-related deaths could be avoided in England each year, if patients and doctors better managed the condition. This is the first-ever audit of patient deaths from diabetes. It says that basic health checks, a good diet and regular medication could prevent most of the deaths. [More]
Diabetes epidemic grips the world

Diabetes epidemic grips the world

Experts are horrified with the rise of numbers of diabetics worldwide. A staggering 366 million people around the world have either Type 1 or 2 diabetes, says the International Diabetes Federation. The disease has taken a deadly toll, causing 4.6 million deaths each year, or one death every seven seconds. The number of sufferers was pegged at 285 million worldwide in 2009. Since then, China reported 92.4 million people with the condition, more than double the federation’s estimate. The diabetes epidemic is also heavy on healthcare spending, to the tune of $465 billion a year to fight the disease. [More]
Texas Children's Hospital uses new surgical approach for treating epilepsy

Texas Children's Hospital uses new surgical approach for treating epilepsy

Texas Children's Hospital is the first hospital in the world to use real-time MRI-guided thermal imaging and laser technology to destroy lesions in the brain that cause epilepsy and uncontrollable seizures. [More]
Diabetes management accepted for coverage by Chemical Abstracts

Diabetes management accepted for coverage by Chemical Abstracts

Future Medicine Ltd announces today that its new journal Diabetes Management (ISSN 1758-1907) which launched in January 2011 has been selected for coverage by Chemical Abstracts. [More]
Diabetes belt mapped out in the US

Diabetes belt mapped out in the US

A government commissioned team of researchers has now identified a diabetes belt in the U.S. County-by-county mapping shows that the highest rates of diabetes cut two paths - one strung through Tennessee, Kentucky and West Virginia, and another running eastward from Louisiana through Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina. This belt also touches parts of North Carolina, Virginia, Florida, Texas, Arkansas, Ohio and Pennsylvania. High-diabetes pockets crop up in Oklahoma, Michigan, Arizona, the Dakotas and elsewhere. The belt includes 644 counties in 15 states with the highest diabetes rates. [More]
$7.5 million Queensland diabetes action plan to roll

$7.5 million Queensland diabetes action plan to roll

According to the latest $7.5 million diabetes action plan, nearly 8,000 people across the Ipswich region who are living with the disease and have not been diagnosed will be helped. Diabetes is growing at a shocking rate with more than 50 Queenslanders diagnosed with the condition every day. Diabetes Australia Queensland says more than 8,000 people in the Ipswich and West Moreton region have been diagnosed with diabetes. Another 8,000 people have the condition but remain undiagnosed. [More]
Diabetes threatens the eyesight of many unsuspecting Americans

Diabetes threatens the eyesight of many unsuspecting Americans

Diabetes causes more new cases of legal blindness among working-age Americans than any other disease. If diabetics are monitored regularly by their ophthalmologist, this vision loss is almost always avoidable. Yet, tragically, more than half of all people living with diabetes do not get the recommended annual dilated eye exam. As the number of people with Type 2 diabetes rises in the U.S., the CDC projects that the number of adults with diabetic retinopathy will double by the year 2050. Yet 90 percent of diabetic eye disease can be prevented simply by proper regular examinations and treatment and by controlling blood sugar. [More]
Diabetic tests must be regulated

Diabetic tests must be regulated

As a benchmark for diagnosing diabetes, the importance of the A1C test must be reevaluated to improve glycemic numeracy of policy makers, patients and providers – who must make real-world decisions. This is based on a commentary published by Wiley-Blackwell in the Journal of Diabetes. [More]
China, now the largest diabetic population in the world

China, now the largest diabetic population in the world

With one in ten adults in China being diagnosed with diabetes the largest population of the world is also the largest diabetic population in the world. A report published by New England Journal of Medicine reported that 92 million people in China were diabetic. This means China has overtaken India which had a 50 million strong diabetic population to date. [More]
Genetic accident in sea provides new insight into diabetes: New research

Genetic accident in sea provides new insight into diabetes: New research

A genetic accident in the sea more than 500 million years ago has provided new insight into diabetes, according to research from Queen Mary, University of London. [More]
Report on the global biosimilars market

Report on the global biosimilars market

The impending expiry of several patented blockbuster biopharmaceuticals and the increasing demand from patients, insurers, and government agencies to reduce drug costs have created numerous opportunities in the global biosimilars market. The global biosimilars market is expected to be worth US$19.4 billion by 2014, growing at a CAGR of 89.1% from 2009 to 2014. The biosimilars market is segmented into peptides, recombinant glycosylated proteins, recombinant non-glycosylated proteins, and others. [More]
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) occurs far more frequently than generally believed

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) occurs far more frequently than generally believed

Although estimates vary widely, when combined with the milder afflictions of Alcohol Related Birth Defects (ARBD) and several others, the Centers for Disease Control puts the frequency of FAS/ARBD as high as one in 100. [More]
Viagra's non-blood pressure effect successfully mimics vasopressin action

Viagra's non-blood pressure effect successfully mimics vasopressin action

Normally your kidneys filter about 50 gallons of blood a day, remove such waste as salts and minerals, and concentrate it into urine. When you exercise or don't take in water, your blood "thickens" and instead of removing water, the kidney reverses the process, pulls in water from the body that would normally go into the urine, and puts it into the blood, thus maintaining water balance. [More]
Nephrogenic Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuresis - a new genetic disease

Nephrogenic Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuresis - a new genetic disease

Two infant boys whose bodies were overloaded with excess fluid have led UCSF pediatricians to the discovery of a new genetic disease. In the process, they have discovered a rare type of mutation where different substitutions in a single amino acid cause two different, opposite genetic disorders. [More]