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Educating parents on healthy infant sleep-related behaviors may help prevent childhood obesity

Educating parents on healthy infant sleep-related behaviors may help prevent childhood obesity

Teaching parents bedtime techniques to encourage healthy sleep habits in their infants may help prevent obesity, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Strong links exist between inadequate sleep and childhood obesity. [More]
Home test using paper strips could help detect cancer, malaria

Home test using paper strips could help detect cancer, malaria

What if testing yourself for cancer or other diseases were as easy as testing your blood sugar or taking a home pregnancy test? In a few years, it might be. [More]
TSRI scientists identify GlyRS protein that launches cancer growth

TSRI scientists identify GlyRS protein that launches cancer growth

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified a protein that launches cancer growth and appears to contribute to higher mortality in breast cancer patients. [More]
Scientists detect gene networks likely to be shared by all CLL patients

Scientists detect gene networks likely to be shared by all CLL patients

Research, involving scientists and doctors at the University of Southampton and Royal Bournemouth Hospital, has identified a network of genes that are likely to be shared by all patients who have chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). [More]
New computer model shows how spleen filters misshapen red blood cells

New computer model shows how spleen filters misshapen red blood cells

Researchers, led by Carnegie Mellon University President Subra Suresh and MIT Principal Research Scientist Ming Dao, have created a new computer model that shows how tiny slits in the spleen prevent old, diseased or misshapen red blood cells from re-entering the bloodstream. [More]
Anthrax capsule vaccine offers protection from deadly anthrax infection in monkeys

Anthrax capsule vaccine offers protection from deadly anthrax infection in monkeys

Vaccination with the anthrax capsule--a naturally occurring component of the bacterium that causes the disease--completely protected monkeys from lethal anthrax infection, according to a study published online this week in the journal VACCINE. [More]
Vice President Biden to host Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C.

Vice President Biden to host Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C.

Vice President Biden and Dr. Jill Biden will host a Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C. at the White House. Cheryl Willman, MD, Director and CEO of The University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center, will attend. [More]
Siemens Healthineers' new CT and MRI technologies to aid research across various common clinical pathways

Siemens Healthineers' new CT and MRI technologies to aid research across various common clinical pathways

The Transforming Outcomes and Health Economics Through Imaging (TOHETI) programme is looking to change the way medical imaging works by undertaking a range of pioneering research. [More]
New light-based technology facilitates deeper look into human body

New light-based technology facilitates deeper look into human body

New light-based technologies that facilitate a look inside the human body using light -- and without cutting into the tissue -- promise to enable both compact, wearable devices for point-of-care diagnostics as well as powerful new systems that provide even more information and from even deeper under the skin. [More]
New optical detection technology could be effective to monitor blood-glucose levels

New optical detection technology could be effective to monitor blood-glucose levels

A newly developed method for detecting glucose based on how it absorbs a specific type of light could spell the end of the painful, invasive finger-prick tests diabetics rely on to monitor their condition, says a Texas A&M University biomedical engineer who is developing the technology. [More]
Insilico Medicine collaborates with Asia Genomics to develop advanced personalized longevity suite

Insilico Medicine collaborates with Asia Genomics to develop advanced personalized longevity suite

Insilico Medicine Inc, a big data analytics company located at the Emerging Technology Centers at the Johns Hopkins University at Eastern, announced an agreement with Asia Genomics, a Singapore-based rapidly growing molecular diagnostics company specializing in clinical genomics & genetic testing operating in major Asian countries including Vietnam, Malaysia and China. [More]
Experts use next-generation genetic sequencing to diagnose suspected brain infections

Experts use next-generation genetic sequencing to diagnose suspected brain infections

In a proof-of-principle study, a team of physicians and bioinformatics experts at Johns Hopkins reports they were able to diagnose or rule out suspected brain infections using so called next-generation genetic sequencing of brain tissue samples. [More]
Telephone counseling can help make cancer genetic services more accessible to rural women

Telephone counseling can help make cancer genetic services more accessible to rural women

Ever since Angelina Jolie used cancer genetic counseling and testing to learn about her risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, many other women have chosen to do the same. [More]
Molecular diagnostics of the future: an interview with Elaine Warburton, OBE

Molecular diagnostics of the future: an interview with Elaine Warburton, OBE

Firstly, a sample must be transported from the clinic to the laboratory. Simple tests may be undertaken in a small lab within the hospital or clinic, whilst complex testing such as drug susceptibility testing is often done in a large centralized laboratory many miles from the clinic [More]
Nonopioid interventional options for chronic pain not covered by insurance in few U.S. states

Nonopioid interventional options for chronic pain not covered by insurance in few U.S. states

Recent studies have shown significant therapeutic value from the use of high-frequency - 10,000 (HF-10) spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for patients experiencing chronic back and leg pain. [More]
Researcher aims to develop easy-to-use, inexpensive sperm sorting devices to help infertile couples

Researcher aims to develop easy-to-use, inexpensive sperm sorting devices to help infertile couples

The competition is fierce and only the strongest survive the obstacle course within the female reproductive tract. Of the millions of sperm that enter the vagina, only about 10 or so make it to the oocyte or egg, demonstrating how rigorous the natural sperm selection process really is. [More]
New study reveals high percentages of unsafe blood lead levels among U.S. children

New study reveals high percentages of unsafe blood lead levels among U.S. children

Despite four decades of public health efforts to minimize children’s exposure to lead, high percentages of unsafe blood lead levels are still found in children in numerous regions of the United States, according to a new study by researchers at Quest Diagnostics, the world’s leading provider of diagnostic information services. [More]
Study sheds new light on how overeating may lead to more eating

Study sheds new light on how overeating may lead to more eating

Research is finally beginning to shed light on some of the reasons that extra weight is difficult to shed permanently. Now, a new study has uncovered another method by which the gut senses how much food a person eats and relays that to the brain. [More]
New superbug test developed by TGen-NAU receives Australian patent

New superbug test developed by TGen-NAU receives Australian patent

Antibiotic-resistant infections should be easier to detect, and hospitals could become safer, thanks to a technology developed by the Translational Genomics Research Institute and Northern Arizona University, and protected under a patent issued by Australia. [More]
New research paves way for potential notch-based anticancer therapeutics

New research paves way for potential notch-based anticancer therapeutics

A recent study led by scientists at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, in collaboration with the Univerity of Maryland School of Pharmacy and StemSynergy Therapeutics, Inc., has identified a small-molecule inhibitor of the Notch pathway, paving the way for a potential new class of personalized cancer medicines. [More]
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