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Tau PET imaging in Alzheimer's disease increases opportunities for developing effective drugs

Tau PET imaging in Alzheimer's disease increases opportunities for developing effective drugs

Tau PET is a new and promising imaging method for Alzheimer's disease. A case study from Lund University in Sweden now confirms that tau PET images correspond to a higher degree to actual changes in the brain. According to the researchers behind the study, this increases opportunities for developing effective drugs. [More]
EVG brings high-volume manufacturing process solutions to biotechnology and medical device market

EVG brings high-volume manufacturing process solutions to biotechnology and medical device market

EV Group, a leading supplier of wafer bonding and lithography equipment for the MEMS, nanotechnology and semiconductor markets, today announced that it is increasing its focus on bringing its high-volume manufacturing process solutions and services to the biotechnology and medical device market. [More]
Association for Molecular Pathology announces winners of 2016 awards

Association for Molecular Pathology announces winners of 2016 awards

The Association for Molecular Pathology, the premier global, non-profit organization serving molecular diagnostics professionals, today announced the recipients of the Jeffrey A. Kant Leadership Award and the AMP Meritorious Service Award. Together with the AMP Award for Excellence in Molecular Diagnostics, these awards will be presented at the AMP 2016 Annual Meeting. [More]
Cross-disciplinary concepts may lead to effective, personalised cancer treatments

Cross-disciplinary concepts may lead to effective, personalised cancer treatments

It is not only tumours and metastases that differ in each type of cancer and each individual sufferer but also receptors in cells. [More]
New research shows childhood diarrhea cases significantly higher than estimated

New research shows childhood diarrhea cases significantly higher than estimated

The number of cases of childhood diarrhoea attributable to pathogens (bacteria, parasites, viruses or other infections) have been substantially underestimated and may be nearly twice as high as previous analysis suggests, according to new research published in The Lancet. [More]
Yale researchers compare efficacy of four PD-L1 assay tests

Yale researchers compare efficacy of four PD-L1 assay tests

In a recent study, a Yale Cancer Center team compared the performance of the four available PD-L1 assay tests. [More]
Ludwig researchers shed more light on key requirement for function of regulatory T cells

Ludwig researchers shed more light on key requirement for function of regulatory T cells

A Ludwig Cancer Research study published online September 5th in Nature Immunology illuminates a key requirement for the function of regulatory T cells—immune cells that play a critical role in many biological processes, from suppressing inflammation and deadly autoimmunity to helping tumors evade immune attack. [More]
Scientists use novel theranostics technique for early thromboembolism diagnosis and treatment

Scientists use novel theranostics technique for early thromboembolism diagnosis and treatment

Researchers from the University of Arkansas for Medical Science (USA), in collaboration with University Hospital Frankfurt and University Hospital Dresden, under the supervision of Prof. Vladimir Zharov and with the participation of Alexander Melerzanov, the dean of Department of Biological and Medical Physics (MIPT), conducted experiments on mice to detect blood clotting using photoacoustic flow-cytometry. [More]
New global health strategy aims to eliminate HCV as global public health threat by 2030

New global health strategy aims to eliminate HCV as global public health threat by 2030

Chronic infection by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) proved fatal for over 700,000 people worldwide in 2013, mainly as a result of liver damage. Although information on the epidemiology of transmission and infection is sparse, recent estimates put the global prevalence of HCV infection at 130-150 million people. [More]
Researchers use novel technique to unravel key mystery of earliest stage of development

Researchers use novel technique to unravel key mystery of earliest stage of development

A Ludwig Cancer Research study published online September 14th in Nature reports a novel technique to map specific chemical (or "epigenetic") modifications made to the protein packaging of DNA using a small population of cells. [More]
Karger publishes new clinical guide on management of chronic itch

Karger publishes new clinical guide on management of chronic itch

Although it is such a common symptom in dermatology, internal medicine, psychosomatics, neurology, and even oncology, itching was under-researched up until 15 years ago. Since then, the clinical aspects of acute and chronic itch have been examined extensively. A new clinical guide on how to manage itch has just been published by Karger. [More]
U-M cardiologists reveal impact from shortage of radioactive elements used in cardiac stress testing

U-M cardiologists reveal impact from shortage of radioactive elements used in cardiac stress testing

Nearly 15 million times a year, Americans with heart trouble climb onto a treadmill to take a stress test that can reveal blockages in their heart's blood vessels. It's a major factor in deciding what doctors should do next for them. [More]
Quest Diagnostics analysis shows workforce drug use in U.S. reaches 10-year high

Quest Diagnostics analysis shows workforce drug use in U.S. reaches 10-year high

Following years of declines, the percentage of employees in the combined U.S. workforce testing positive for drugs has steadily increased over the last three years to a 10-year high, according to an analysis of nearly 11 million workforce drug test results released today by Quest Diagnostics, the world's leading provider of diagnostic information services. [More]
Food intolerance testing: an interview with Dr Gill Hart

Food intolerance testing: an interview with Dr Gill Hart

Food intolerances are caused by adverse reactions to food or drink ingredients in your body. These are very different to food allergies. It is estimated that up to forty-five percent of the population suffers from food intolerances. [More]
Siemens launches new cloud-based network to help connect imaging departments across the UK

Siemens launches new cloud-based network to help connect imaging departments across the UK

Siemens Healthineers has launched its new cloud-based network, encouraging connectivity, comparison and collaboration across imaging departments in the UK. [More]
DigitalHealth.London launches new Accelerator programme to support cohort of health businesses

DigitalHealth.London launches new Accelerator programme to support cohort of health businesses

We are excited to announce the launch of the very first cohort of the DigitalHealth.London Accelerator programme, on 12 September 2016. [More]
Revolutionary new scanning technique creates 3D images of bones with unparalleled resolution

Revolutionary new scanning technique creates 3D images of bones with unparalleled resolution

Chemists from Trinity College Dublin in collaboration with RCSI have devised a revolutionary new scanning technique that produces extremely high-res 3D images of bones -- without exposing patients to X-ray radiation. [More]
New four-stranded version of DNA may hold key to development of targeted cancer therapies

New four-stranded version of DNA may hold key to development of targeted cancer therapies

Scientists have identified where a four-stranded version of DNA exists within the genome of human cells, and suggest that it may hold a key to developing new, targeted therapies for cancer. [More]
Nanoparticles shaped like rods and worms could effectively deliver drugs, research suggests

Nanoparticles shaped like rods and worms could effectively deliver drugs, research suggests

When it comes to delivering drugs, nanoparticles shaped like rods and worms are the best bet for making the daunting journey to the centre of a cell, new Australian research suggests. [More]
First accurate simulation reveals how virus shape changes when invading host cell

First accurate simulation reveals how virus shape changes when invading host cell

For the first time, scientists know what happens to a virus' shape when it invades a host cell, thanks to an experiment by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. [More]
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