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Obeticholic acid drug shows promise against bile acid diarrhoea

Obeticholic acid drug shows promise against bile acid diarrhoea

A pilot study testing a new type of drug in patients with chronic diarrhoea has shown promising effects on reducing their symptoms. [More]
Statement on Ebola epidemic

Statement on Ebola epidemic

The Ebola virus is spreading rapidly and to an unexpected extent. The outbreak does not follow the patterns experienced in the past and the virus shows a new disease dynamic in regions, where it has never been recorded before. For this reason, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, acatech – the German Academy of Science and Engineering, and the Union of the German Academies of Sciences and Humanities have presented a statement on the Ebola epidemic today. [More]
Four out of ten children in Burkina Faso genetically resistant to virus strains

Four out of ten children in Burkina Faso genetically resistant to virus strains

Every year rotavirus causes half a million diarrhoea-related deaths amongst children in developing countries. Existing vaccines provide poor protection. The reason could be a widespread genetic resistance amongst children, according to virologists at Linköping University. [More]
New research shows impact of ulcerative colitis on patients' quality of life, treatment satisfaction

New research shows impact of ulcerative colitis on patients' quality of life, treatment satisfaction

New research shows that the majority of patients with the challenging inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis (UC), state that the three biggest impacts of the disease on their lives are on their emotional state (in terms of depression, anger or anxiety levels) (76%), ability to get adequate rest/sleep (75%), and taking sick days off work (70%). Those who have had a colectomy (removal of the colon) were more likely to suffer from these impacts. [More]
Sanitation programme in India increases latrine coverage, not health

Sanitation programme in India increases latrine coverage, not health

A sanitation programme currently being widely implemented in low-income communities in India significantly increases latrine coverage but does not actually improve health, a study involving 100 rural villages, published in The Lancet Global Health has found. [More]
Depression contributes to abnormal pain processes in IBS patients

Depression contributes to abnormal pain processes in IBS patients

High rates of anxiety and depression amongst patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have led many researchers to believe there could be a causal relationship between psychological factors and IBS symptoms. Now, scientists in Germany have found clear evidence that patients with IBS process pain signals from the gut abnormally, and that disturbed brain responses to pain are particularly pronounced in patients with more depression symptoms. [More]
AZD9291 shows median progression-free survival in patients with EGFRm T790M+ advanced NSCLC

AZD9291 shows median progression-free survival in patients with EGFRm T790M+ advanced NSCLC

Updated data from the ongoing AURA study of AZD9291 shows encouraging, although still immature, median progression free survival of 9.6 months (95% CI 8.3 to NC) in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation positive (EGFRm) T790M+ advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had disease progression following treatment with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR TKI). [More]
Cediranib combined with chemotherapy improves survival in recurrent cervical cancer

Cediranib combined with chemotherapy improves survival in recurrent cervical cancer

For patients with cervical cancer that has recurred after treatment or has spread elsewhere in the body, adding the experimental drug cediranib to standard chemotherapy improves tumour shrinkage and adds a modest improvement in progression-free survival, researchers report at the ESMO 2014 Congress in Madrid. [More]
Fecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for effective treatment of C. difficile infection

Fecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for effective treatment of C. difficile infection

The transplantation of faecal microbiota from a healthy donor has been shown in recent clinical studies to be a safe and highly effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection and is now recommended in European treatment guidelines. [More]
Oxabact now recognized as potential treatment for Short Bowel Syndrome

Oxabact now recognized as potential treatment for Short Bowel Syndrome

SBS is a highly disabling malabsorptive condition. SBS is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, reduced quality of life and high healthcare costs. [More]
Pneumonia in COPD patients has distinct clinical features

Pneumonia in COPD patients has distinct clinical features

The aetiology and clinical features of community-acquired pneumonia are different in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease than in those without the lung condition, Spanish research demonstrates. [More]
New UNICEF report points out that 2.8 million babies die each year during first 28 days of life

New UNICEF report points out that 2.8 million babies die each year during first 28 days of life

Child survival rates have increased dramatically since 1990, during which time the absolute number of under-five deaths has been slashed in half from 12.7 million to 6.3 million, according to a report released today by UNICEF. [More]
Belgian receives research grant from Jeffrey Modell to help cure IPEX syndrome

Belgian receives research grant from Jeffrey Modell to help cure IPEX syndrome

For the first time the Jeffrey Modell Foundation is giving a research grant to a Belgian laboratory. The team of Adrian Liston from VIB-KU Leuven will use the grant to develop a gene therapy to cure children that suffer from IPEX syndrome, a rare and fatal autoimmune disorder in which the immune system attacks the body's own tissues and organs. [More]
University of Leicester research sniffs out smell of disease in feces

University of Leicester research sniffs out smell of disease in feces

A fast-sensitive "electronic-nose" for sniffing the highly infectious bacteria C. diff, that causes diarrhoea, temperature and stomach cramps, has been developed by a team at the University of Leicester. [More]
Experts call for action to prevent health risks associated with climate change

Experts call for action to prevent health risks associated with climate change

Previously unrecognized health benefits could be realized from fast action to reduce climate change and its consequences. For example, changes in energy and transport policies could save millions of lives annually from diseases caused by high levels of air pollution. The right energy and transport policies could also reduce the burden of disease associated with physical inactivity and traffic injury. [More]
Genetic changes in patients with Crohn's disease could hold clues to fighting illness

Genetic changes in patients with Crohn's disease could hold clues to fighting illness

Genetic changes that occur in patients with the bowel condition Crohn's disease could hold clues to fighting the illness. [More]
First-line sunitinib superior to everolimus for metastatic RCC

First-line sunitinib superior to everolimus for metastatic RCC

Results for the RECORD-3 trial support the current strategy of first-line sunitinib followed by second-line everolimus for the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. [More]
Families affected by conflict in Syria receive parenting advice from experts

Families affected by conflict in Syria receive parenting advice from experts

Families living in and affected by the conflict in Syria have been receiving parenting advice from experts at The University of Manchester via a daily bread delivery service. [More]
Anti-cholinergic drugs could be responsible for decline in cognitive, physical function in elderly patients

Anti-cholinergic drugs could be responsible for decline in cognitive, physical function in elderly patients

Drugs widely prescribed to the elderly could be responsible for a decline in cognitive and physical function according to research from the University of East Anglia and the Regenstrief Institute. [More]

EMA CHMP adopts positive opinion for Janssen’s IMBRUVICA to treat CLL and MCL

Janssen-Cilag International NV announced today that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency adopted a positive opinion recommending the granting of a marketing authorisation for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) in the European Union. [More]