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Focused therapy may be effective, less toxic way to treat brain tumors

Focused therapy may be effective, less toxic way to treat brain tumors

Physicians from Carolinas HealthCare System's Neurosciences Institute and Levine Cancer Institute are among the authors of a study that was accepted for publication by the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study, released on July 26, 2016, shows that patients with the most common form of brain tumor can be treated in an effective and substantially less toxic way by omitting a widely used portion of radiation therapy. [More]
First confirmed case of Alzheimer’s disease in HIV-positive patient to be presented at AAIC 2016

First confirmed case of Alzheimer’s disease in HIV-positive patient to be presented at AAIC 2016

The first case of Alzheimer's disease diagnosed in an HIV-positive individual will be presented in a poster session at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2016 in Toronto July 27. [More]
Menopause and insomnia could make women age faster

Menopause and insomnia could make women age faster

Two UCLA studies reveal that menopause--and the insomnia that often accompanies it -- make women age faster. [More]
Report: Britons at risk of long-term disability, reduced life expectancy due to delays in treatment services

Report: Britons at risk of long-term disability, reduced life expectancy due to delays in treatment services

Up to a million Britons are at risk of preventable, long-term disability and reduced life expectancy due to delays in referrals to specialist advice and treatment services, according to the most comprehensive audit of rheumatology services carried out across England and Wales. [More]
Study highlights role of BCL11A gene in intellectual disability syndrome

Study highlights role of BCL11A gene in intellectual disability syndrome

Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics have found a gene responsible for an intellectual disability disorder and proven how it works. [More]
Scientists undertake major biomedical research initiative to escalate problem of sepsis

Scientists undertake major biomedical research initiative to escalate problem of sepsis

A multidisciplinary team of scientists -- including two UC Santa Barbara faculty members -- is poised to undertake a major biomedical research initiative focused on the escalating problem of sepsis, the body's abnormal response to severe infections. [More]
Researchers develop antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis

Researchers develop antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis

Inserm Unit U919, directed by Prof. Denis Vivien has developed an antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis. [More]
Alterations in genomic region linked to risk of ASD have distinctive effects on cognition, study reports

Alterations in genomic region linked to risk of ASD have distinctive effects on cognition, study reports

A new study in Biological Psychiatry reports that variations in 16p11.2, a region of the genome associated with risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), have distinct effects on cognition. The findings highlight the diversity of people with ASD. [More]
Study identifies ten potentially modifiable risk factors for stroke

Study identifies ten potentially modifiable risk factors for stroke

Hypertension remains the single most important modifiable risk factor for stroke, and the impact of hypertension and nine other risk factors together account for 90% of all strokes, according to an analysis of nearly 27000 people from every continent in the world, published in The Lancet. [More]
First arthritis model in zebrafish offers new hope for finding biological cure

First arthritis model in zebrafish offers new hope for finding biological cure

The very first bony fish on Earth was susceptible to arthritis, according to a USC-led discovery that may fast-track therapeutic research in preventing or easing the nation's most common cause of disability. [More]
Delirium in older surgical patients may be linked to long-term cognitive decline

Delirium in older surgical patients may be linked to long-term cognitive decline

Researchers from the Harvard Medical School - affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research have found increasing evidence that delirium in older surgical patients may be associated with long-term cognitive decline. [More]

Mayo Clinic earns recognition for efforts in disability-inclusion practices

Mayo Clinic has been recognized by the U.S. Business Leadership Network and the American Association of People With Disabilities for its efforts in its disability inclusion efforts. On a survey of Fortune 1,000 companies, Mayo Clinic was 1 of 42 companies that scored a perfect 100 on the Disability Equality Index. Mayo Clinic is featured on the 2016 DEI Best Places to Work list. [More]
Maturitas provides new holistic model of care for healthy menopause

Maturitas provides new holistic model of care for healthy menopause

A new position statement by the European Menopause and Andropause Society published in the journal Maturitas provides a holistic model of care for healthy menopause. [More]
Study provides more insights into abusive head injury in small children

Study provides more insights into abusive head injury in small children

Abusive head injury, sometimes referred to as shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental trauma, is the third leading cause of head injuries in small children in the US. For children under the age of 1 year, it is the cause of the majority of serious head injuries. [More]
New NIH grant to help advance Purdue University autism technology

New NIH grant to help advance Purdue University autism technology

Federal funding will help advance a Purdue University autism technology that helps communication and language development for children and families affected by severe, nonverbal autism and other communicative challenges. [More]
New genetic test provides rapid diagnosis of mitochondrial disease

New genetic test provides rapid diagnosis of mitochondrial disease

Newcastle researchers have developed a genetic test providing a rapid diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders to identify the first patients with inherited mutations in a new disease gene. [More]
Sub-sensory vibratory noise leads to greater postural control, improved mobility in older adults

Sub-sensory vibratory noise leads to greater postural control, improved mobility in older adults

Researchers from the Harvard affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research, have published a recent article in the Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation which gives evidence that sub-sensory vibrations delivered to the foot sole of older adults significantly augmented the physiologic complexity of postural control and led to improvement in a given mobility assessment. [More]
Daclizumab drug offers new treatment option for people living with relapsing forms of MS in the UK

Daclizumab drug offers new treatment option for people living with relapsing forms of MS in the UK

A new, first-in-class treatment which is believed to use a double-action approach to fight MS by rebalancing the immune system, has today been authorised in the UK for people living with relapsing forms (the most common type) of the disease. [More]
Study reveals high healthcare costs for chronic pain patients in Canada

Study reveals high healthcare costs for chronic pain patients in Canada

Costs of patients who develop chronic post-surgical pain could range from $2.5 million to $4.1 million a year, in one Ontario hospital alone, according to a study in Pain Management. [More]
Study finds delayed onset of illness for centenarians than younger counterparts

Study finds delayed onset of illness for centenarians than younger counterparts

Research has shown that the human lifespan has the potential to be extended. But would this merely mean people living longer in poor health? The upbeat findings from a new study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society indicate that those extra years could well be healthy ones [More]
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