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New electric mesh device wraps around the heart to deliver electrical impulses

New electric mesh device wraps around the heart to deliver electrical impulses

A research team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Seoul National University has developed a new electric mesh device that can be wrapped around the heart to deliver electrical impulses and thereby improve cardiac function in experimental models of heart failure, a major public health concern and leading cause of mortality and disability. [More]

Mobility researcher examines effects of WheelDrive

Whilst the advantages of a wheelchair with auxiliary drive are self-evident, they do not always outweigh the disadvantages. The weight of the construction can pose a physical burden on a certain group of wheelchair users, according to research from the University of Twente in The Netherlands. [More]
Stent retriever devices revolutionize acute ischemic stroke care

Stent retriever devices revolutionize acute ischemic stroke care

New devices called stent retrievers, which effectively reverse strokes, have revolutionized the treatment of certain stroke patients, according to an article in the journal Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics. [More]
Scientists isolate antibodies capable of neutralizing dengue and Zika virus

Scientists isolate antibodies capable of neutralizing dengue and Zika virus

Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS, in collaboration with Imperial College London and the University of Vienna, Austria, have identified antibodies that can efficiently neutralize both the dengue virus and the Zika virus. [More]
Study to examine new ways to transfer autistic child's improving communication skills into education setting

Study to examine new ways to transfer autistic child's improving communication skills into education setting

A University of Manchester-led study is testing whether an intervention with parents and teachers can help children with autism transfer newly acquired social communication skills from home into school. [More]
Walnut consumption linked to reduced risk of developing physical function impairments in older women

Walnut consumption linked to reduced risk of developing physical function impairments in older women

A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition suggests that consuming 1-2 servings of walnuts per week (1/4 cup per serving) was associated with reduced risk of developing impairments in physical function, which helps enable older women to maintain independence throughout the aging process. [More]
New magnetically controlled drug safe, effective in dissolving blood clots

New magnetically controlled drug safe, effective in dissolving blood clots

Critical conditions associated with the blockage of blood vessels are one of the primary health concerns worldwide. [More]
Researchers find improvements in many aspects of U.S. diet

Researchers find improvements in many aspects of U.S. diet

In nationally representative surveys conducted between 1999 and 2012, several improvements in self-reported dietary habits were identified, such as increased consumption of whole grains, with additional findings suggesting persistent or worsening disparities based on race/ethnicity and education and income level, according to a study appearing in the June 21 issue of JAMA. [More]
New study reveals increasing trend in Parkinson's disease over 30 years

New study reveals increasing trend in Parkinson's disease over 30 years

The incidence of Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism increased significantly in 30 years from 1976 to 2005, Mayo Clinic researchers reported today in a study in JAMA Neurology. [More]
Study shows childhood adversities, sleep disturbances interfere with immune system regulation

Study shows childhood adversities, sleep disturbances interfere with immune system regulation

Adverse childhood experiences and sleep disturbances interfere with immune system regulation, shows research from the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
IOF urges clinicians in Asia to prepare for escalating crisis of osteoporosis among elderly people

IOF urges clinicians in Asia to prepare for escalating crisis of osteoporosis among elderly people

The International Osteoporosis Foundation is calling on doctors in the Asia-Pacific region to prepare for an immense rise in the number of elderly people suffering broken bones as a result of osteoporosis. [More]
Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Research published this week shows that women working long hours for many years are at increased risk of developing life-threatening illnesses. Diabetes, cancer, heart trouble and arthritis were three times more common among women who worked an average of 60 hours or more per week for 30 years compared with women working fewer hours. [More]
Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Leaky blood vessels in the brain called cerebral microbleeds are associated with an increased risk of physical and cognitive disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study by researchers in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. [More]
S1P1R variation may cause differential patient responses to fingolimod treatment

S1P1R variation may cause differential patient responses to fingolimod treatment

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder that results in demyelination of neurons. The FDA-approved drug fingolimod (Gilenya, FTY-720) modulates signaling by the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which is linked to MS pathogenesis. [More]
Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Women who put in long hours for the bulk of their careers may pay a steep price: life-threatening illnesses, including heart disease and cancer. [More]
Lack of affordable, accessible adaptive clothing creates barriers for people with disabilities

Lack of affordable, accessible adaptive clothing creates barriers for people with disabilities

The U.S. clothing industry is a multi-billion dollar industry, but for the millions of Americans with disabilities and their families, a lack of options in the apparel industry presents daily challenges. [More]
Stroke can cause long-term damage to blood-spinal cord barrier, study finds

Stroke can cause long-term damage to blood-spinal cord barrier, study finds

A team of researchers at the University of South Florida investigating the short and long-term effects of ischemic stroke in a rodent model has found that stroke can cause long-term damage to the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB), creating a "toxic environment" in the spinal cord that might leave stroke survivors susceptible to motor dysfunction and disease pathology. [More]
U-M researchers explore new way to improve cognitive issues in MS patients

U-M researchers explore new way to improve cognitive issues in MS patients

Multiple sclerosis looks different from person to person. In many individuals, though, the difficulty in maintaining a sense of self and in keeping up intellectually can be the disease's most devastating manifestations. [More]
Facebook advertising could be more effective way of identifying IBP patients

Facebook advertising could be more effective way of identifying IBP patients

The results of a UK study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed that busing Facebook to raise awareness about the symptoms of Inflammatory Back Pain (IBP) and the need to seek medical help early may reduce the delay in diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Study sheds light on why many RA patients do not adhere to treatment

Study sheds light on why many RA patients do not adhere to treatment

Two new studies presented at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress have shed light on why so many patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) do not adhere to their therapy, even in the early stages of their treatment. [More]
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