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Global life expectancy climbs, but people live longer with illnesses

Global life expectancy climbs, but people live longer with illnesses

Global life expectancy has risen by more than six years since 1990 as healthy life expectancy grows; ischemic heart disease, lower respiratory infections, and stroke cause the most health loss around the world. [More]
Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Researchers have determined how the most common gene mutation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) disrupts normal cell function, providing insight likely to advance efforts to develop targeted therapies for these brain diseases. [More]

New study examines link between playing adaptive sports and higher employment

Wheelchair rugby and basketball players are aggressive, conditioned and determined, just like people without disabilities. Unlike them, though, is their likelihood of employment and economic independence. A new study from the University of Houston Department of Health and Human Performance (HHP) finds playing an adaptive sport can have dramatic results on the athlete and the economy. [More]
Clementia expands enrollment to include children with FOP in ongoing Phase 2 clinical trial

Clementia expands enrollment to include children with FOP in ongoing Phase 2 clinical trial

Clementia Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the initiation of enrollment of children as young as 6 years old in the company's ongoing Phase 2 study of palovarotene for the treatment of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP). [More]
Montefiore, Burke partner to increase availability of rehabilitation therapies in Westchester County and beyond

Montefiore, Burke partner to increase availability of rehabilitation therapies in Westchester County and beyond

Today, Montefiore Health System and Burke Rehabilitation Hospital announced plans for a new strategic partnership that will expand the availability of advanced rehabilitation therapies in Westchester County and beyond. This new alliance will enhance the missions of both institutions by aligning each of their core strengths and creating a collaboration that will enhance patient experiences and results. [More]
Researchers evaluate use of pharmacy-based naloxone education and distribution to fight opioid overdoses

Researchers evaluate use of pharmacy-based naloxone education and distribution to fight opioid overdoses

In response to the growing opioid crisis, several states, including Massachusetts and Rhode Island, have granted pharmacists the authority to provide naloxone rescue kits without a prescription to at-risk patients. This model of pharmacy-based naloxone (PBN) education and distribution is one of the public health strategies currently being evaluated at hundreds of pharmacies in both states to determine the impact on opioid overdose death rates. [More]
Researchers awarded $6.4 million grant to identify causes of neurodevelopmental disorders in children with CHDs

Researchers awarded $6.4 million grant to identify causes of neurodevelopmental disorders in children with CHDs

As advances in medicine are giving rise to growing numbers of children who are surviving severe heart defects, a phenomenon is emerging that is catching parents and healthcare providers off-guard. Over half of these children also have a seemingly unrelated disability: neurodevelopmental disorders. Some have severe cognitive and motor deficits that arise early. [More]
SI-BONE announces publication of results from INSITE and SIFI studies

SI-BONE announces publication of results from INSITE and SIFI studies

SI-BONE, Inc., a medical device company that pioneered the use of the iFuse Implant System, a minimally invasive surgical (MIS) device indicated for fusion for certain disorders of the sacroiliac (SI) joint, announced the publication of one-year results from two separate prospective multicenter clinical trials as well as the publication of a systematic review of 18 MIS SI joint fusion studies. [More]
Understanding the causes of sudden death in epilepsy: an interview with Professor Sanjay Sisodiya

Understanding the causes of sudden death in epilepsy: an interview with Professor Sanjay Sisodiya

SUDEP is the sudden unexpected witnessed or unwitnessed, non-traumatic and non-drowning death in people with epilepsy, with or without evidence of a seizure. It doesn’t necessarily have to be in the known context of a seizure, excluding documented status epilepticus, where people have seizure after seizure. [More]
Cognitive factors associated with activity, participation in everyday life among people with MS

Cognitive factors associated with activity, participation in everyday life among people with MS

Kessler Foundation researchers found that processing speed is the primary limiting factor associated with activity and participation in everyday life among people with multiple sclerosis (MS). "Factors that moderate activity limitation and participation restriction in people with multiple sclerosis" was published in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy. [More]
New study finds significant association between ADHD and TBI

New study finds significant association between ADHD and TBI

A new study has found a "significant association" between adults who have suffered a traumatic brain injury at some point in their lives and who also have attention deficit hyperactive disorder. [More]
Researchers find effectiveness of ramelteon for treatment of sleep disturbances after TBI

Researchers find effectiveness of ramelteon for treatment of sleep disturbances after TBI

Kessler researchers found preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of ramelteon for the treatment of sleep disturbances after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The article, "Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation on May 28, 2015. Authors are Anthony Lequerica, PhD, and Nancy Chiaravalloti, PhD, of Kessler Foundation, Neil Jasey, MD, of Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, and Jaclyn Portelli Tremont, MA, of Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University. [More]
GARFIELD-AF data to demonstrate impact of antithrombotic treatment patterns on AF patients at ESC Congress 2015

GARFIELD-AF data to demonstrate impact of antithrombotic treatment patterns on AF patients at ESC Congress 2015

New analyses from the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field - Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) will be presented at ESC Congress 2015 to be held in London, United Kingdom, from August 29 to September 2, 2015. [More]

New NIH study shows nearly 50 million U.S. adults experience chronic pain or severe pain

Nearly 50 million American adults have significant chronic pain or severe pain, according to a new study prepared by National Institutes of Health's National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, which appears this month in The Journal of Pain, published by the American Pain Society. [More]
Bacteria in gut may be the cause of uveitis in the eye

Bacteria in gut may be the cause of uveitis in the eye

The inflammatory eye disorder autoimmune uveitis occurs when a person's immune system goes awry, attacking proteins in the eye. What spurs this response is a mystery, but now a study on mice suggests that bacteria in the gut may provide a kind of training ground for immune cells to attack the eye. [More]
Vitamin D supplements may help reduce risk of falls in homebound elderly

Vitamin D supplements may help reduce risk of falls in homebound elderly

Every year falls affect approximately one in three older adults living at home, with approximately one in 10 falls resulting in serious injury. Even if an injury does not occur, the fear of falling can lead to reduced activity and a loss of independence. [More]
Kessler Foundation researcher confirms link between sleep disturbances and MS-related fatigue

Kessler Foundation researcher confirms link between sleep disturbances and MS-related fatigue

Kessler Foundation's Lauren Strober, PhD, explores the association of secondary fatigue and sleep disturbances in multiple sclerosis (MS). "Fatigue in multiple sclerosis: a look at the role of poor sleep" was published in Frontiers in Neurology. [More]
‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

Many "medical foods" are designed to help manage patients with rare inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs), and can help prevent serious and life-threatening complications. However, such special foods may cause harm in some patients when their use is not carefully monitored and managed, according to a research team led by scientists at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Researchers receive Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant to eliminate neglected tropical diseases

Researchers receive Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant to eliminate neglected tropical diseases

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have received a $7 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation aimed at eliminating river blindness and elephantiasis, two neglected tropical diseases that annually sicken millions. [More]
First clinical trial to test use of retinal progenitor cells for treating retinitis pigmentosa begins

First clinical trial to test use of retinal progenitor cells for treating retinitis pigmentosa begins

Participants are being enrolled in the first clinical trial that tests the use of retinal progenitor cells to treat retinitis pigmentosa, reported project director Dr. Henry Klassen of UCI's Gavin Herbert Eye Institute and Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center. The product of stem cell research at UCI, these retinal progenitors are similar to stem cells in terms of potential regenerative properties, but they're specific to the retina. [More]
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