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Workplace-based sleep health program can reduce injuries and disability in firefighters

Workplace-based sleep health program can reduce injuries and disability in firefighters

Many firefighters suffer acute and chronic sleep deficiency and misalignment of their circadian rhythm (body clock) due to extended shifts and long work weeks. [More]
New study identifies cost-effective way to reduce death due to rabies

New study identifies cost-effective way to reduce death due to rabies

Every year in India, 20,000 people are estimated to die from rabies. Most of the victims are children. Nearly all of the deaths occur after victims are bitten by rabid dogs. For years, experts have debated the best strategy to reduce this burden. [More]
Chair yoga may be effective approach to reduce osteoarthritis pain in older adults, study shows

Chair yoga may be effective approach to reduce osteoarthritis pain in older adults, study shows

For the millions of older adults who suffer from osteoarthritis in their lower extremities (hip, knee, ankle or foot), chair yoga is proving to be an effective way to reduce pain and improve quality of life while avoiding pharmacologic treatment or adverse events. [More]
Antibiotics targeting brain’s inflammatory response may exacerbate cognitive deficits in children

Antibiotics targeting brain’s inflammatory response may exacerbate cognitive deficits in children

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of disability and death in infants and children in the United States, with more than half a million affected annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
New review finds link between exposure to alcohol marketing and youth drinking behavior

New review finds link between exposure to alcohol marketing and youth drinking behavior

A new analysis of 12 long-term studies published since 2008 from across the globe finds that young people under the legal drinking age who are more exposed to alcohol marketing appear more likely to start drinking early and also to engage in binge drinking. [More]
Special issue of Optometry and Vision Science features new research on visual dysfunction after TBI

Special issue of Optometry and Vision Science features new research on visual dysfunction after TBI

Vision problems are a common and sometimes lasting consequence of head injuries—from children and teens with sports-related concussions to military personnel with combat-related traumatic brain injury (TBI). [More]
Older adults who visit ED at increased risk for long-term disability, Yale study finds

Older adults who visit ED at increased risk for long-term disability, Yale study finds

Older adults who go to the emergency department (ED) for an illness or injury are at increased risk for disability and decline in physical abilities up to six months later, according to a study by Yale researchers. [More]
Global new partnership awarded 15 million euro to find better treatments for Multiple Sclerosis

Global new partnership awarded 15 million euro to find better treatments for Multiple Sclerosis

A large global new partnership called 'MultipleMS', coordinated by Karolinska Institute in Sweden, has been awarded 15 million euro from the European Commission in the Horizon2020 program to find novel and better treatments for Multiple Sclerosis (MS). [More]
Gun violence is least-researched and underfunded cause of death, study shows

Gun violence is least-researched and underfunded cause of death, study shows

Funding and publication of gun violence research are disproportionately low compared to other leading causes of death in the United States, according to new research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai published online today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Phase I study of selumetinib drug shows partial response in pediatric neural tumors

Phase I study of selumetinib drug shows partial response in pediatric neural tumors

In an early-phase clinical trial of a new oral drug, selumetinib, children with the common genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and plexiform neurofibromas, tumors of the peripheral nerves, tolerated selumetinib and, in most cases, responded to it with tumor shrinkage. [More]
Bicycle exercise may benefit ICU patients, shows study

Bicycle exercise may benefit ICU patients, shows study

Early bicycle exercise during their stay in a hospital intensive care unit (ICU) may help some patients recover more quickly. [More]
Study reports volume and cost of in-home care for children with special medical conditions

Study reports volume and cost of in-home care for children with special medical conditions

U.S. families provide nearly $36 billion annually in uncompensated medical care at home to children who have special health care needs, such as muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis, according to a large national study. [More]
Kessler Foundation researcher receives grant to identify treatments for cognitive deficits in people with SCI

Kessler Foundation researcher receives grant to identify treatments for cognitive deficits in people with SCI

The three-year federal grant will fund research to identify treatments for cognitive difficulties in persons with spinal cord injury. [More]
Study tracks parents' unpaid time assisting children with special health care needs

Study tracks parents' unpaid time assisting children with special health care needs

About half of U.S. children with special health care needs -- 5.6 million children -- receive medical care from uncompensated family members worth billions of dollars, finds a large national study led by Boston Children's Hospital and the University of Southern California (USC). [More]
Cedars-Sinai expert explains how to recognize signs and symptoms of stroke during the holidays

Cedars-Sinai expert explains how to recognize signs and symptoms of stroke during the holidays

Along with increased cheer and festivities during the holidays comes an increased risk of stroke, one of the leading causes of death and disability in the U.S. [More]
Scientists identify gene variants causing unrecognized developmental disorder

Scientists identify gene variants causing unrecognized developmental disorder

An international team of scientists has identified variants of the gene EBF3 causing a developmental disorder with features in common with autism. [More]
Person's ‘brain speed’ may matter more than other risk factors for geriatric falls

Person's ‘brain speed’ may matter more than other risk factors for geriatric falls

"Why does a 30-year-old hit their foot against the curb in the parking lot and take a half step and recover, whereas a 71-year-old falls and an 82-year-old falls awkwardly and fractures their hip?" asks James Richardson, M.D., professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Musculoskeletal Center. [More]
Texas A&M specialist explains what people need to know about mumps

Texas A&M specialist explains what people need to know about mumps

Mumps may seem like a contagion relegated to history books, but like many other diseases of the past now preventable with a vaccine, mumps has been making a resurgence. [More]
A positive announcement for DePuy Synthes’ ATTUNE® Knee System

A positive announcement for DePuy Synthes’ ATTUNE® Knee System

DePuy Synthes, part of the Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies, today announced that implant survivorship data from the 2016 Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJRR) confirm positive early results for DePuy Synthes’ ATTUNE® Knee System. These data add to recent UK Joint Registry evidence which indicate that survivorship for the ATTUNE Knee compares favorably to other cemented knee systems in its class. In addition, recently-presented interim data on two studies suggest improved patient reported outcomes measures with the ATTUNE Knee compared to other leading knee systems. [More]
Low-carbohydrate diet may help reverse inherited intellectual disability linked to Kabuki syndrome

Low-carbohydrate diet may help reverse inherited intellectual disability linked to Kabuki syndrome

Experimenting on mice with a genetic change similar to that found in people with a rare inherited disease called Kabuki syndrome, Johns Hopkins scientists report that a very low-carbohydrate diet can "open up" DNA and improve mental function. [More]
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