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Research findings could lead to new approaches to treating schizophrenia

Research findings could lead to new approaches to treating schizophrenia

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date, conducted with 80,000 people. [More]
Study finds microglia increase neuronal firing and enhance brain cell survival after injury

Study finds microglia increase neuronal firing and enhance brain cell survival after injury

A type of immune cell widely believed to exacerbate chronic adult brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), can actually protect the brain from traumatic brain injury (TBI) and may slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, according to Cleveland Clinic research published today in the online journal Nature Communications. [More]
Viewpoints: Problems in training docs; impact of HHS' territory decision; what Halbig decision might mean

Viewpoints: Problems in training docs; impact of HHS' territory decision; what Halbig decision might mean

ast week's burst of world disorder was ideal for a news dump, and the White House didn't disappoint: On no legal basis, all 4.5 million residents of the five U.S. territories were quietly released from ObamaCare. [More]
Peer-led interventions can reduce depression and anxiety in mothers of kids with autism

Peer-led interventions can reduce depression and anxiety in mothers of kids with autism

Peer-led interventions that target parental well-being can significantly reduce stress, depression and anxiety in mothers of children with disabilities, according to new findings released today in the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Researchers uncover new schizophrenia gene links

Researchers uncover new schizophrenia gene links

The discovery of over a hundred genetic risk factors linked to schizophrenia provides vital new clues in understanding what causes the condition and will kick-start the search for new treatments, according to leading UK scientists. [More]
First diagnostic criteria proposed for Christianson Syndrome

First diagnostic criteria proposed for Christianson Syndrome

Because the severe autism-like condition Christianson Syndrome was only first reported in 1999 and some symptoms take more than a decade to appear, families and doctors urgently need fundamental information about it. A new study that doubles the number of cases now documented in the scientific literature provides the most definitive characterization of CS to date. [More]
Findings point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia

Findings point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and scores of other institutions from all over the world have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in what is the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date. [More]
Study in mice reveals that MSCs help rejuvenate skeletal muscle after resistance exercise

Study in mice reveals that MSCs help rejuvenate skeletal muscle after resistance exercise

A new study in mice reveals that mesenchymal (mezz-EN-chem-uhl) stem cells (MSCs) help rejuvenate skeletal muscle after resistance exercise. [More]
New study explores processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain

New study explores processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain

New research provides an intriguing glimpse into the processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain. These connections, or synapses, allow nerve cells to transmit and process information involved in thinking and moving the body. [More]

Study: 40% of Ontario female prisoners have history of traumatic brain injury

A study published today found that almost 40 per cent of Ontario female prisoners have a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Unlike the men participating in the study, half of these women sustained a TBI before committing their first crime. [More]
Viewpoints: GOP's 'cynical' lawsuit against Obama; debt crisis is not over

Viewpoints: GOP's 'cynical' lawsuit against Obama; debt crisis is not over

There's not much that Republicans like about the 2010 Affordable Care Act, but one thing they particularly dislike is the requirement that employers with 50 or more full-time workers provide comprehensive health insurance. [More]
Researcher finds genetic identifier that may allow clinicians to determine babies at risk for autism

Researcher finds genetic identifier that may allow clinicians to determine babies at risk for autism

A researcher at Seattle Children's Hospital and Research Institute has found a genetic identifier for autism that includes physical features that may eventually allow clinicians to identify babies who are at risk for autism before they are born. [More]
Cholesterol-lowering statins may prolong lives of people with diabetic cardiovascular disease

Cholesterol-lowering statins may prolong lives of people with diabetic cardiovascular disease

Heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death and disability among people with Type 2 diabetes. In fact, at least 65 percent of people with diabetes die from some form of heart disease or stroke, according to the American Heart Association. [More]
Study finds 20% overall drop per decade in deaths after stroke

Study finds 20% overall drop per decade in deaths after stroke

Fewer Americans are having strokes and those who do have a lower risk of dying from them finds a new study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers. [More]
Rates of stroke incidence, subsequent death decrease among black and white U.S. adults

Rates of stroke incidence, subsequent death decrease among black and white U.S. adults

In a study that included a large sample of black and white U.S. adults from several communities, rates of stroke incidence and subsequent death decreased from 1987 to 2011, with decreases varying across age-groups, according to a study in the July 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
Telecare intervention leads to improvement in chronic musculoskeletal pain

Telecare intervention leads to improvement in chronic musculoskeletal pain

A telephone-delivered intervention, which included automated symptom monitoring, produced clinically meaningful improvements in chronic musculoskeletal pain compared to usual care, according to a study in the July 16 issue of JAMA. [More]

VA makes disability payments without evidence to cut backlog

The Department of Veterans Affairs is making disability payments to thousands of veterans without adequate medical evidence they deserve the benefits as the agency attempts to cut a huge backlog of claims, a department watchdog says. [More]

Japanese SF-MPQ valid for neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain

Researchers have developed a Japanese translated version of the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire-2 that shows good reliability and validity for discriminating between chronic neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain. [More]
First Edition: July 15, 2014

First Edition: July 15, 2014

Today's headlines include news about how some states are planning to address their backlogs of new Medicaid enrollees. [More]
CGP partners with Leader Prospects to serve employees of Indian companies

CGP partners with Leader Prospects to serve employees of Indian companies

Chestnut Global Partners (www.chestnutglobalpartners.org), a provider of culturally-aware employee assistance and wellness programs to companies worldwide, today announced that it has partnered with Leader Prospects, an HR and work/life consulting company based in India, to form CGP India (CGPI). [More]