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One-third of US population can't be transported by ambulance to stroke center within one hour

One-third of US population can't be transported by ambulance to stroke center within one hour

One-third of the US population does not have access to a primary stroke center within one hour by ambulance, and even under optimal conditions, a large proportion of the US would be unable to access a stroke center within this window, according to a new study published in the March 4, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Early symptoms of post-traumatic stress strongly predict later disability in military personnel

Early symptoms of post-traumatic stress strongly predict later disability in military personnel

Evaluating military personnel with blast-related mild traumatic brain injuries, researchers have found that early symptoms of post-traumatic stress, such as anxiety, emotional numbness, flashbacks and irritability, are the strongest predictors of later disability. [More]
GeneSight test better predicts antidepressant outcomes for patients with depression

GeneSight test better predicts antidepressant outcomes for patients with depression

The combinatorial, multi-gene GeneSight test has been found to better predict antidepressant treatment outcomes for patients with depression, and their use of health care resources, than any of the individual genes that comprise the test, according to a peer-reviewed analysis by investigators from the Mayo Clinic and Assurex Health, and published online by The Pharmacogenomics Journal. [More]
Scientists produce cartilage from embryonic stem cells

Scientists produce cartilage from embryonic stem cells

Scientists have succeeded in producing cartilage formed from embryonic stem cells that could in future be used to treat the painful joint condition osteoarthritis. [More]
CHOPS syndrome sheds light on key biological processes during human development

CHOPS syndrome sheds light on key biological processes during human development

Analyzing a puzzling multisystem disorder in three children, genetic experts have identified a new syndrome, shedding light on key biological processes during human development. The research also provides important information to help caregivers manage the disorder, and may offer clues to eventually treating it. [More]
New technology could help researchers advance blood biomarker capabilities for TBI

New technology could help researchers advance blood biomarker capabilities for TBI

New technology being introduced at NYU Langone Medical Center could help researchers advance blood biomarker capabilities that show changes in low concentrations of specific proteins present following a neurological injury. [More]
WHO: 1.1 billion young people at risk of hearing loss due to unsafe use of personal audio devices

WHO: 1.1 billion young people at risk of hearing loss due to unsafe use of personal audio devices

Some 1.1 billion teenagers and young adults are at risk of hearing loss due to the unsafe use of personal audio devices, including smartphones, and exposure to damaging levels of sound at noisy entertainment venues such as nightclubs, bars and sporting events, according to WHO. Hearing loss has potentially devastating consequences for physical and mental health, education and employment. [More]
Articles discuss use of ICF in clinical practice, research related to neurorehabilitation

Articles discuss use of ICF in clinical practice, research related to neurorehabilitation

Use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) has increased significantly over the last decade. The current issue of NeuroRehabilitation features a series of insightful articles that provide examples of how the ICF can be successfully implemented in clinical practice and research related to neurorehabilitation, ultimately benefiting patient care. [More]

Study finds significant differences in likelihood of employment, income levels of older people

Changes in pension and employment policies are making it increasingly necessary for older people in the UK to work beyond the age of 65. However, new research from the University of Surrey finds significant differences in the likelihood of employment and income levels of people beyond 65, depending on their gender and health. [More]
Drinking coffee may lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Drinking coffee may lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Drinking coffee may be associated with a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
Researchers find that people with disabilities have unmet medical needs, poorer overall health

Researchers find that people with disabilities have unmet medical needs, poorer overall health

People with disabilities have unmet medical needs and poorer overall health throughout their lives, and as a result should be recognized as a health disparity group so more attention can be directed to improving their quality of life, a team of policy researchers has found. [More]
Monell Center to promote Anosmia Awareness Day with new educational outreach initiatives

Monell Center to promote Anosmia Awareness Day with new educational outreach initiatives

The Monell Center announces three new educational outreach initiatives to promote Anosmia Awareness Day, which takes place on February 27. Each was designed to increase awareness and increase the limited information currently available about anosmia, the loss of our sense of smell, which affects over six million Americans and many millions more worldwide. [More]
Three innovative research projects aim to improve lives of people with mobility difficulties

Three innovative research projects aim to improve lives of people with mobility difficulties

A prosthetic hand controlled by the nervous system, robotic clothing to help people with walking, and biosensors to monitor how patients use equipment or exercise during rehabilitation are the focus of three research projects awarded £5.3 million by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. [More]
‘Still Alice’ movie portrays young onset dementia

‘Still Alice’ movie portrays young onset dementia

"An Academy Award for this movie would be a triumph," says Brian Appleby, MD, geriatric psychiatrist at University Hospitals Case Medical Center about the movie, "Still Alice," starring Julianne Moore. [More]
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a leading nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for individuals living with paralysis, announced it has awarded $600,137 in Quality of Life grants to 75 nonprofit organizations nationwide. [More]
Mobile devices may help better diagnose patients with chronic health issues

Mobile devices may help better diagnose patients with chronic health issues

Smartphones and tablets may hold the key to getting more nurses to diagnose patients with chronic health issues like obesity, smoking, and depression -- three of the leading causes of preventable death and disability. [More]
WHO urges affected countries to increase investment in tackling neglected tropical diseases

WHO urges affected countries to increase investment in tackling neglected tropical diseases

WHO urges affected countries to scale up their investment in tackling 17 neglected tropical diseases in order to improve the health and well-being of more than 1.5 billion people. This investment would represent as little as 0.1% of current domestic expenditure on health in affected low and middle income countries for the period 2015-2030. [More]
Special issue presents wider view of environment, treatment options for returning soldiers

Special issue presents wider view of environment, treatment options for returning soldiers

Veterans returning from combat often face a multitude of challenges: Debilitating physical and psychological conditions, a civil society that does not support and even actively criticizes the war from which the soldiers have returned, or personal and family circumstances that changed while they were away. [More]
Advances in stem cell therapy can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers

Advances in stem cell therapy can improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers

According to data presented at the 73rd Annual Scientific Conference of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, advances in stem cell therapy can significantly improve outcomes for patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers. Use of stem cells to treat foot problems like diabetic ulcers may speed up the healing process, preventing infection and hospitalization during recovery. [More]
Scientists identify potential target to combat leishmaniasis

Scientists identify potential target to combat leishmaniasis

Research led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists has identified a potential target in the quest to develop a more effective treatment for leishmaniasis, a parasitic tropical disease that kills thousands and sickens more than 1 million people worldwide each year. [More]