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SARIL-RA-TARGET trial: Sarilumab meets co-primary efficacy endpoints in RA patients

SARIL-RA-TARGET trial: Sarilumab meets co-primary efficacy endpoints in RA patients

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi announced today that a Phase 3 study of sarilumab, an investigational, fully human IL-6 receptor antibody, met its co-primary efficacy endpoints of a greater improvement in signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at 24 weeks and physical function at 12 weeks, compared to placebo. [More]
Researchers find that blocking MCAM molecule could slow progression of multiple sclerosis

Researchers find that blocking MCAM molecule could slow progression of multiple sclerosis

A drug that could halt the progression of multiple sclerosis may soon be developed thanks to a discovery by a team at the CHUM Research Centre and the University of Montreal. The researchers have identified a molecule called MCAM, and they have shown that blocking this molecule could delay the onset of the disease and significantly slow its progression. [More]
Researchers find link between acute hospitalizations and disability among older adults at the end of life

Researchers find link between acute hospitalizations and disability among older adults at the end of life

Yale researchers found a close association between acute hospitalizations and the development and progression of disability among older adults at the end of life. Their findings may have profound implications for medical decision-making for older people and those who care for them. [More]
Zona Plus isometric handgrip device now available in Canada for patients with high blood pressure

Zona Plus isometric handgrip device now available in Canada for patients with high blood pressure

The Zona Plus isometric handgrip device ("Zona Plus") which combines personalized technology and an easy-to-follow 12 minutes per day, five days per week routine for patients with high blood pressure is now available in Canada. [More]
Short course of oral steroids unlikely to provide much benefit for patients with acute sciatica

Short course of oral steroids unlikely to provide much benefit for patients with acute sciatica

Among patients with acute sciatica caused by a herniated lumbar disk (a condition also known as "acute radiculopathy"), a short course of oral steroids resulted in only modest improvement in function and no significant improvement in pain, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Handshakes better than your blood pressure at assessing your health

Handshakes better than your blood pressure at assessing your health

The firmness of your hand grip is better than your blood pressure at assessing your health, Hamilton researchers have found, and reduced muscular strength, measured by your grip, is consistently linked with early death, disability and illness. [More]
Study provides comprehensive analysis of economic burden in cancer survivors

Study provides comprehensive analysis of economic burden in cancer survivors

A new study finds the economic burden of cancer extends beyond diagnosis and treatment, and concludes that cancer survivors face thousands of dollars of excess medical expenses every year as well as excess employment disability and loss of production at work. [More]
Major breakthrough provides new insights into how tinnitus develops

Major breakthrough provides new insights into how tinnitus develops

Tinnitus is the most common service-related disability for veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Often described as a ringing in the ears, more than 1.5 million former service members, one out of every two combat veterans, report having this sometimes debilitating condition, resulting in more than $2 billion dollars in annual disability payments by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. [More]
Walnut-enriched diet may slow colorectal tumor growth

Walnut-enriched diet may slow colorectal tumor growth

A new animal study from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, led by Dr. Christos Mantzoros, indicates that a diet containing walnuts may slow colorectal tumor growth by causing beneficial changes in cancer genes. [More]
Experts to discuss impact of telemedicine on care delivery for aging Americans at d.health Summit

Experts to discuss impact of telemedicine on care delivery for aging Americans at d.health Summit

Recent technological, legal, and clinical developments are leading to dramatic changes in the ways medical care is delivered. While this shift has the power to displace many well-established healthcare players, it also presents an opportunity to form new partnerships and business alliances among industry leaders and newcomers to improve and enhance healthcare delivery. [More]
New scanning methods could help predict people vulnerable to schizophrenia

New scanning methods could help predict people vulnerable to schizophrenia

New scanning methods which map the wiring of the brain could provide a valuable new tool to predict people at risk of schizophrenia, according to a new study. [More]
Therese S. Richmond recognized with Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award

Therese S. Richmond recognized with Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award

Therese S. Richmond, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, the Andrea B. Laporte Professor of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, received the Claire M. Fagin Distinguished Researcher Award on April 28 at the University. [More]
NIH-sponsored Phase 1 clinical trial evaluates novel investigational West Nile virus vaccine

NIH-sponsored Phase 1 clinical trial evaluates novel investigational West Nile virus vaccine

A novel investigational West Nile virus vaccine discovered and developed by scientists at the Oregon National Primate Research Center at Oregon Health & Science University is being evaluated in an NIH-sponsored Phase 1, first-in-human, clinical trial at Duke University. Although several early-stage West Nile virus vaccine clinical trials have been completed to date, no human vaccine has been approved for commercial use. [More]
WHO, IHME partner to improve quality and use of global health information

WHO, IHME partner to improve quality and use of global health information

WHO and the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation today signed a Memorandum of Understanding defining areas where they will work together to improve the quality and use of global health estimates to measure the world's health challenges. [More]
UT Southwestern testing Vivistim System device in stroke patients

UT Southwestern testing Vivistim System device in stroke patients

UT Southwestern Medical Center will be one of three national sites to pioneer U.S. testing for an implant device that stimulates the vagus nerve in stroke patients to see whether it can help restore lost arm function. [More]
Comprehensive stroke centers reduce mortality risk in patients treated for hemorrhagic stroke

Comprehensive stroke centers reduce mortality risk in patients treated for hemorrhagic stroke

New research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association indicates that patients who are treated for hemorrhagic stroke at a comprehensive stroke center are more likely to receive specialized treatment, reducing the risk of mortality. [More]

MSI completes patient recruitment for STRADA Phase 2 trial for treatment of major depressive disorder

MSI Methylation Sciences, Inc., a pharmaceutical company developing a once-daily oral, small molecule therapy for adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD), announced the completion of patient recruitment for its HORIZON Phase 2 Study. [More]
Researchers report new primary care model to address trauma

Researchers report new primary care model to address trauma

Recognizing that patients' experiences of childhood and adult trauma are common and have a direct impact on their health, UCSF clinical researchers and Positive Women's Network-USA have developed and are reporting a new primary care model. [More]

Parliamentary Secretary Scott Armstrong encourages health experts to tackle mental health issues in workplaces

On behalf of the Honourable Dr. K. Kellie Leitch, Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women, Scott Armstrong, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Labour, addressed health and safety experts at the 2015 Light the Way and Chemical Dependency Education and Rehabilitation Program National Conference in Cornwall today. [More]
WHO and UNHCR jointly issue new guide to better identify, manage mental health needs

WHO and UNHCR jointly issue new guide to better identify, manage mental health needs

Worldwide close to 80 million people are currently impacted by humanitarian emergencies arising from natural disasters and armed conflicts, such as those in the Central African Republic, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen, and more recently, Nepal. WHO estimates 5% to 10% of these people suffer from a mental health condition such as depression as a result of the emergency. [More]
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