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New study measures neurodevelopment in schizophrenia

New study measures neurodevelopment in schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is generally considered to be a disorder of brain development and it shares many risk factors, both genetic and environmental, with other neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and intellectual disability. [More]
Research roundup: Prevention services for seniors; drug shortages

Research roundup: Prevention services for seniors; drug shortages

This policy brief reports the findings of a systematic review conducted by the Community Health Innovations in Prevention for Seniors (CHIPS) project. ... Clinical preventive services such as colorectal cancer screening and pneumococcal immunization can help reduce rates of premature death and disability. Yet, many older adults are not receiving the full set of clinical preventive services that have been proven effective and are considered "high value" in terms of their costs per life saved. Rates are particularly low among racial and ethnic minority older adults compared to national goals. [More]
Working memory may be underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in MS

Working memory may be underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in MS

Kessler Foundation scientists have shown that working memory may be an underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Study shows xenon gas treatment reduces brain damage after head injury

Study shows xenon gas treatment reduces brain damage after head injury

Treatment with xenon gas after a head injury reduces the extent of brain damage, according to a study in mice. [More]
People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) lose myelin in the gray matter of their brains and the loss is closely correlated with the severity of the disease, according to a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. [More]
Young people who have attempted suicide less likely to have successful professional career later

Young people who have attempted suicide less likely to have successful professional career later

People who have attempted suicide when young are less likely to have a successful professional career later in life. [More]
Treatment at earliest age reduces symptoms of autism spectrum disorder

Treatment at earliest age reduces symptoms of autism spectrum disorder

Treatment at the earliest age when symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) appear - sometimes in infants as young as 6 months old - significantly reduces symptoms so that, by age 3, most who received the therapy had neither ASD nor developmental delay, a UC Davis MIND Institute research study has found. [More]
Treatment with xenon gas after head injury reduces extent of brain damage

Treatment with xenon gas after head injury reduces extent of brain damage

Treatment with xenon gas after a head injury reduces the extent of brain damage, according to a study in mice. [More]
State highlights: Texas lawmaker proposes '3 strikes' for nursing homes

State highlights: Texas lawmaker proposes '3 strikes' for nursing homes

New Yorker Deadra Malloy was diagnosed with HIV in 1988, but she remained healthy for so long she wasn't completely convinced she was positive. [More]
Nearly 18 million people get help with daily activities

Nearly 18 million people get help with daily activities

Nearly half of older adults - 18 million people-have difficulty or get help with daily activities, according to a new study. [More]
Canada funds 22 inventive ideas for improving health in low-resource countries

Canada funds 22 inventive ideas for improving health in low-resource countries

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, today announced $2.4 million in seed funds shared between 22 projects from Canada and nine developing nations, to pursue inventive new ideas for improving health in low-resource countries. [More]
USF receives FEMA grant to reduce risk of low back pain, disability in firefighters

USF receives FEMA grant to reduce risk of low back pain, disability in firefighters

The University of South Florida's John Mayer, DC, PhD, recently received a $1.3 million Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency Assistance of Firefighters grant - a three-year award that will help build upon cumulative research evaluating the effectiveness of targeted exercise programs to reduce the risk of low back pain and disability in firefighters. [More]
Longer looks: Alzheimer's and a marriage; racism in medicine; abortion restrictions in Texas

Longer looks: Alzheimer's and a marriage; racism in medicine; abortion restrictions in Texas

The US, which has a mostly private health-care system, manages to spend more on its public health-care system than countries where the health-care system is almost entirely public. America's government spends more, as a percentage of the economy, on public health care than Canada, the United Kingdom, Japan or Australia. And then it spends even more than that on private health care. [More]

Data provides information on rising number of clinics that treat psychosomatic problems

Germany economy is a leading force in the world and a model that calls for imitation. A paper published in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics provides information on the rising number of clinics that treat burn-out and job-related psychosomatic problems. [More]

Tenn., Utah exploring Medicaid expansion options

Tenn. Gov. Bill Haslam says state may soon send a proposal to Washington while Utah Gov. Gary Herbert said he is hopeful about expansion for his state. [More]
Yoga program for MS patients improves physical and mental well-being

Yoga program for MS patients improves physical and mental well-being

Paula Meltzer was only 38 when out of nowhere everything she looked at was blurry. For the single mother, who had a lucrative career as a gemologist and spent hours examining valuable pieces of jewelry, it seemed as if - in a split second - her life changed. [More]
Researchers reveal how alteration of single nucleotide could initiate fragile X syndrome

Researchers reveal how alteration of single nucleotide could initiate fragile X syndrome

Researchers reveal how the alteration of a single nucleotide—the basic building block of DNA—could initiate fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited form of intellectual disability. The study appears in The Journal of Cell Biology. [More]
Comprehensive fitness and nutrition regimens may prevent bone and muscle deterioration

Comprehensive fitness and nutrition regimens may prevent bone and muscle deterioration

Being physically active may significantly improve musculoskeletal and overall health, and minimize or delay the effects of aging, according to a review of the latest research on senior athletes (ages 65 and up) appearing in the September issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS). [More]
MS study uses fNIRS to examine brain activation during working memory task

MS study uses fNIRS to examine brain activation during working memory task

Using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), Kessler Foundation researchers have shown differential brain activation patterns between people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls. [More]

Non-invasive functional neuroimaging tools help characterize how brain activity disrupted in dyslexia

A new study in Biological Psychiatry maps the circuitry of dyslexia. Dyslexia, the most commonly diagnosed learning disability in the United States, is a neurological reading disability that occurs when the regions of the brain that process written language don't function normally. [More]