Dopamine News and Research RSS Feed - Dopamine News and Research

Dopamine is a hormone and neurotransmitter occurring in a wide variety of animals, including both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the brain, this phenethylamine functions as a neurotransmitter, activating the five types of dopamine receptors — D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5, and their variants. Dopamine is produced in several areas of the brain, including the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area. Dopamine is also a neurohormone released by the hypothalamus. Its main function as a hormone is to inhibit the release of prolactin from the anterior lobe of the pituitary. Dopamine has many functions in the brain, including important roles in behavior and cognition, motor activity, motivation and reward, inhibition of prolactin production (involved in lactation), sleep, mood, attention, and learning. Dopaminergic neurons (i.e., neurons whose primary neurotransmitter is dopamine) are present chiefly in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the midbrain, substantia nigra pars compacta, and arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus.
New study to examine effectiveness of orally administered drug in treating stuttering

New study to examine effectiveness of orally administered drug in treating stuttering

Stuttering, an interruption in the flow of speech, affects about three million Americans. It begins most often in childhood, affecting four men for every woman. A precise cause of this complex communicative disorder is not known. [More]
Lund University stem cell researcher awarded Fernström prize for study on repairing damaged brain

Lund University stem cell researcher awarded Fernström prize for study on repairing damaged brain

Is it possible to convert a patient’s own skin cells into functioning nerve cells? Or insert healthy genes to reprogram the cells of a damaged brain? Stem cell researcher Malin Parmar at Lund University in Sweden is studying these types of issues, in close collaboration with clinical researchers. [More]
Tendency to feel lonely linked partially to genetic traits

Tendency to feel lonely linked partially to genetic traits

Loneliness is linked to poor physical and mental health, and is an even more accurate predictor of early death than obesity. [More]
UC Irvine study shows how YHS effectively treats different forms of pain

UC Irvine study shows how YHS effectively treats different forms of pain

Root extracts from the flowering herbal plant Corydalis yanhusuo, or YHS, has widely used for centuries as a pain treatment. Yet few studies have investigated how it works on different forms of pain, and little is known about its molecular mechanisms. [More]
Mood stabilizers may decrease negative symptoms in psychiatric patients with specific genotype

Mood stabilizers may decrease negative symptoms in psychiatric patients with specific genotype

A drug prescribed to many patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder may decrease negative symptoms for people with a certain variant of the COMT gene, suggests a new study from researchers at Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Real-time MRI guidance could help target and deliver stem cell therapies

Real-time MRI guidance could help target and deliver stem cell therapies

Working with animals, a team of scientists reports it has delivered stem cells to the brain with unprecedented precision by threading a catheter through an artery and infusing the cells under real-time MRI guidance. [More]
New biomarker test helps detect autoimmune-induced neuropsychiatric disorders

New biomarker test helps detect autoimmune-induced neuropsychiatric disorders

A research team from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, led by Madeleine Cunningham, Ph.D., in conjunction with the National Institute of Mental Health, has developed the first-of-its-kind biomarker test to help detect autoimmune-induced neuropsychiatric disorders. [More]
Study sheds new light on biological mechanisms that drive flashbulb memory

Study sheds new light on biological mechanisms that drive flashbulb memory

Most people remember where they were when the twin towers collapsed in New York ... new research reveals why that may be the case. [More]
New mice study identifies trick to enhance memories

New mice study identifies trick to enhance memories

Imagine if playing a new video game or riding a rollercoaster could help you prepare for an exam or remember other critical information. [More]
Schizophrenia drug slows pancreatic tumor growth in mice

Schizophrenia drug slows pancreatic tumor growth in mice

A receptor for the dopamine neurotransmitter promotes growth and spread of pancreatic cancer -- and schizophrenia drugs, which block the function of this receptor, slowed tumor growth and metastatic spread in mice, according to researchers at McGill University and the German Cancer Research Center. [More]
Scientists discover brain circuit crucial to sleep-wake cycle

Scientists discover brain circuit crucial to sleep-wake cycle

Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have identified a brain circuit that's indispensable to the sleep-wake cycle. [More]
Research reveals new insights into happy hormone, dopamine

Research reveals new insights into happy hormone, dopamine

Dopamine is a so-called messenger substance or neurotransmitter that conveys signals between neurons. [More]
Alcohol cravings may be initiated in right ventral striatum of the brain

Alcohol cravings may be initiated in right ventral striatum of the brain

If you really want a drink right now, the source of your craving may be a pea-sized structure deep inside the right side of your brain, according to scientists at the Indiana University School of Medicine. [More]
TSRI scientists find evidence supporting new therapeutic strategy against cocaine addiction

TSRI scientists find evidence supporting new therapeutic strategy against cocaine addiction

An international team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has found strong evidence supporting a new strategy against drug addiction. [More]
Drugs designed to target nervous system could control inflammation in the gut, study shows

Drugs designed to target nervous system could control inflammation in the gut, study shows

There's a reason it's called a gut feeling. The brain and the gut are connected by intricate neural networks that signal hunger and satiety, love and fear, even safety and danger. These networks employ myriad chemical signals that include dopamine, a powerful neurotransmitter most famous for its role in reward and addiction. [More]
New laboratory model replicates early phase of Parkinson's before onset of motor symptoms

New laboratory model replicates early phase of Parkinson's before onset of motor symptoms

They're two of the biggest mysteries in Parkinson's disease research--where does the disease start? And how can it be stopped early in the process? Now, a new laboratory model of Parkinson's is giving scientists an inside look at what happens in the brain years before motor symptoms appear. [More]
Activation of specific neural circuit can inhibit binge-like eating behavior in mice

Activation of specific neural circuit can inhibit binge-like eating behavior in mice

While binge eating affects about 10 percent of adults in the United States, the neurobiological basis of the disease is unclear. [More]
Scientists make major advance in understanding how stem cells become specialized

Scientists make major advance in understanding how stem cells become specialized

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have made a major advance in understanding how the cells of an organism, which all contain the same genetic information, come to be so diverse. [More]
Scientists develop interactive model to fast-track research and treatment of schizophrenia

Scientists develop interactive model to fast-track research and treatment of schizophrenia

It's called mental imbalance for a reason. Sanity hangs, in part, in the gentle balance of chemicals strung together within regions of the brain in an intricate matrix. [More]
UTA researchers find how changing estrogen levels make women more vulnerable to cocaine addiction

UTA researchers find how changing estrogen levels make women more vulnerable to cocaine addiction

Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington are studying how fluctuating estrogen levels make females increasingly sensitive to the rewarding effects of cocaine and ultimately, vulnerable to cocaine addiction. [More]
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