Dopamine News and Research RSS Feed - Dopamine News and Research

Dopamine is a hormone and neurotransmitter occurring in a wide variety of animals, including both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the brain, this phenethylamine functions as a neurotransmitter, activating the five types of dopamine receptors — D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5, and their variants. Dopamine is produced in several areas of the brain, including the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area. Dopamine is also a neurohormone released by the hypothalamus. Its main function as a hormone is to inhibit the release of prolactin from the anterior lobe of the pituitary. Dopamine has many functions in the brain, including important roles in behavior and cognition, motor activity, motivation and reward, inhibition of prolactin production (involved in lactation), sleep, mood, attention, and learning. Dopaminergic neurons (i.e., neurons whose primary neurotransmitter is dopamine) are present chiefly in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the midbrain, substantia nigra pars compacta, and arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus.
Low-dose lithium lowers involuntary motor movements in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Low-dose lithium lowers involuntary motor movements in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Low-dose lithium reduced involuntary motor movements - the troubling side effect of the medication most commonly used to treat Parkinson's disease (PD) - in a mouse model of the condition that is diagnosed in about 60,000 Americans each year. The third in a series of studies from the Andersen lab involving PD and low-dose lithium, the results add to mounting evidence that low-doses of the psychotropic drug could benefit patients suffering from the incurable, degenerative condition. [More]
Discovery brings hope for people suffering from Parkinson's disease

Discovery brings hope for people suffering from Parkinson's disease

Scientists from Singapore's Nanyang Technological University and McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School in the United States have found that existing anti-malaria drugs could be a potential treatment for Parkinson's disease. [More]
New study shows high-fat diet can cause impairments in functioning of mesolimbic dopamine system

New study shows high-fat diet can cause impairments in functioning of mesolimbic dopamine system

High-fat feeding can cause impairments in the functioning of the mesolimbic dopamine system, says Stephanie Fulton of the University of Montreal and the CHUM Research Centre. This system is a critical brain pathway controlling motivation. Fulton's findings, published today in Neuropsychopharmacology, may have great health implications. [More]
Does smoking increase the risk of developing psychosis?

Does smoking increase the risk of developing psychosis?

Research conducted at King’s College London and reported in Lancet Psychiatry today indicates that smoking is associated with an increased risk of developing psychosis; a mental health disorder that disrupts normal processing by the brain causing delusion and hallucination. [More]
Cognizin citicoline shows promise in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence

Cognizin citicoline shows promise in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence

The results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial showed that Cognizin citicoline (Jarrow Formulas) was effective at reducing cocaine use, based on urine drug screens, in patients with bipolar disorder and cocaine dependence. The study, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry in Advance, included a total of 130 outpatients with bipolar I disorder and cocaine dependence, who received either Cognizin citicoline or placebo add-on therapy for 12 weeks. [More]
Increased sleepiness may necessitate cautious PD management

Increased sleepiness may necessitate cautious PD management

Many patients with early Parkinson’s disease develop excessive daytime sleepiness as their condition progresses, a study shows. [More]
Potential new class of drugs lessen neurodegeneration in rat model of Parkinson's disease

Potential new class of drugs lessen neurodegeneration in rat model of Parkinson's disease

The first test in a mammalian model of a potential new class of drugs to treat Parkinson's disease shows abatement of neurodegeneration in the brains of test rats and no significant toxicities, University of Alabama at Birmingham and Pfizer Inc. researchers report online in The Journal of Biological Chemistry. [More]
New 3D cell culture system could facilitate search for therapeutic agents for Parkinson's disease

New 3D cell culture system could facilitate search for therapeutic agents for Parkinson's disease

The progressive loss of neurons in the brain of Parkinson's patients is slow yet inexorable. So far, there are no drugs that can halt this insidious process. [More]
Research shows New Zealand blackcurrants are good for keeping us mentally young and agile

Research shows New Zealand blackcurrants are good for keeping us mentally young and agile

Research has shown that New Zealand blackcurrants are good for keeping us mentally young and agile, a finding that could have potential in managing the mental decline associated with aging populations, or helping people with brain disorders such as Parkinson's disease or depression. [More]
Clinical studies confirm safety, efficacy of opicapone in Parkinson’s disease patients

Clinical studies confirm safety, efficacy of opicapone in Parkinson’s disease patients

BIAL is presenting 11 research posters at the 19th International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders (June 14–15, San Diego, CA). These evaluate the safety and efficacy of opicapone (BIA 9-1067), a novel once-daily catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor for use as adjunctive therapy in levodopa-treated Parkinson’s disease patients with end of dose motor fluctuations. [More]
NTCELL Phase I/IIa clinical study meets primary endpoint in patients with Parkinson’s disease

NTCELL Phase I/IIa clinical study meets primary endpoint in patients with Parkinson’s disease

Living Cell Technologies Limited today announced results from a Phase I/IIa clinical study of NTCELL, an experimental regenerative cell therapy being studied as a disease-modifying agent in Parkinson’s disease. The study, conducted in four patients in New Zealand, met its primary endpoint of safety, showing NTCELL implantation was well tolerated, with no adverse events considered to be related to NTCELL. [More]
New TSRI study integrates neuroscience and psychological research to understand sleep, memory

New TSRI study integrates neuroscience and psychological research to understand sleep, memory

In Macbeth, Shakespeare describes sleep as "the death of each day's life," but he may have gotten it wrong. Sleep, as it turns out, may be the one thing that keeps our memories alive and intact. [More]
ADHD drug improves cognitive decline in menopausal women

ADHD drug improves cognitive decline in menopausal women

According to a new study, women experiencing difficulty with time management, attention, organization, memory, and problem solving - often referred to as executive functions - related to menopause may find improvement with a drug already being used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). [More]
Brain protein key to binge drinking? An interview with Dr. Candice Contet

Brain protein key to binge drinking? An interview with Dr. Candice Contet

Alcohol binge drinking is mostly driven by positive reinforcement, a process in which a rewarding experience (e.g., the euphoria one feels when intoxicated) strengthens the behaviour leading to this experience (e.g., going to a bar). [More]
Study suggests direct biophysical link between chronic pain, depression and anxiety

Study suggests direct biophysical link between chronic pain, depression and anxiety

Brain inflammation caused by chronic nerve pain alters activity in regions that regulate mood and motivation, suggesting for the first time that a direct biophysical link exists between long-term pain and the depression, anxiety and substance abuse seen in more than half of these patients, UC Irvine and UCLA researchers report. [More]
Resting-state connectivity changes underpinning ICDs identified

Resting-state connectivity changes underpinning ICDs identified

The presence of impulse control disorders is associated with reduced resting-state connectivity between part of the associative striatum and both associative and limbic cortical regions in patients with Parkinson’s disease, a study suggests. [More]
New UF study shows that multi-tasking may improve cognitive performance

New UF study shows that multi-tasking may improve cognitive performance

A new University of Florida study challenges the notion that multi-tasking causes one or both activities to suffer. In a study of older adults who completed cognitive tasks while cycling on a stationary bike, UF researchers found that participants' cycling speed improved while multi-tasking with no cost to their cognitive performance. [More]
Study finds link between pyrethroid pesticide exposure and ADHD in children, teens

Study finds link between pyrethroid pesticide exposure and ADHD in children, teens

A new study links a commonly used household pesticide with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and young teens. [More]
MIT researchers find neural circuit that appears to cause decision-making in approach-avoidance conflict

MIT researchers find neural circuit that appears to cause decision-making in approach-avoidance conflict

Some decisions arouse far more anxiety than others. Among the most anxiety-provoking are those that involve options with both positive and negative elements, such choosing to take a higher-paying job in a city far from family and friends, versus choosing to stay put with less pay. [More]
Scorpion venom could kill cancer cells

Scorpion venom could kill cancer cells

When the toxin invades channels in the cells with this disease produces cellular damage until killing them. [More]
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