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ADDF awards grant to support initiation of AGB101 Phase 3 trial for aMCI treatment

ADDF awards grant to support initiation of AGB101 Phase 3 trial for aMCI treatment

The Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation announced today a $900,000 grant to AgeneBio, a pharmaceutical company developing innovative therapies for neurologic and psychiatric diseases. The grant will support the initiation of an FDA-registered Phase 3 clinical trial of AGB101, a new therapeutic treatment for amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). [More]
Manchester researcher discover novel way to eradicate cancer stem cells

Manchester researcher discover novel way to eradicate cancer stem cells

A way to eradicate cancer stem cells, using the side-effects of commonly used antibiotics, has been discovered by a University of Manchester researcher following a conversation with his young daughter. [More]
TGH develops unique new method to help high-risk patients receive a lung transplant

TGH develops unique new method to help high-risk patients receive a lung transplant

A unique new method to treat a specific group of patients who are at greater risk of rejecting a donor lung, allowing them to live longer after transplant without rejection, has been developed by the Toronto Lung Transplant Program at Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network. [More]
Reducing A2A adenosine receptor levels prevents memory impairments in Alzheimer's mouse model

Reducing A2A adenosine receptor levels prevents memory impairments in Alzheimer's mouse model

A study by scientists from the Gladstone Institutes shows that decreasing the number of A2A adenosine receptors in a particular type of brain cells called astrocytes improved memory in healthy mice. What's more, reducing receptor levels also prevented memory impairments in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Researchers probe possibility of reversing medications' adverse cognitive effects

Researchers probe possibility of reversing medications' adverse cognitive effects

Whether the adverse cognitive effects of medications can be reversed is of significant importance to an aging population, their caregivers and their families, as well as to an overburdened health care system. [More]
Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome can be compared to normal aging, say scientists

Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome can be compared to normal aging, say scientists

In a new research study, scientists from Vision Genomics, LLC, Insilico Medicine, Inc., and Howard University showed that Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS or Progeria) is comparable to normal aging with respect to cellular signaling pathways, and that HGPS truly recapitulates the normal aging process. [More]
Silencing neurons in the arcopallium

Silencing neurons in the arcopallium

New research published by the Neuronal Mechanism for Critical Period Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University has shown the effectiveness of chemogenetic inhibition used to suppress neuronal activity as well as interesting results on how vocalization is controlled through this techniques application in zebra finches. [More]
Antibiotic use by travellers may promote spread of drug-resistant 'super-bacteria'

Antibiotic use by travellers may promote spread of drug-resistant 'super-bacteria'

Treating travellers' diarrhoea with antibiotics can promote the spread of drug-resistant "super-bacteria". [More]
Ghrelin hormone supplement increases sexual activity in mice

Ghrelin hormone supplement increases sexual activity in mice

Swedish studies show that mice that receive a supplement of the "appetite hormone" ghrelin increase their sexual activity. Whether the hormone has the same impact on humans is unknown - but if it does, the researchers may have found the key to future treatments for sex abuse. [More]
Investigators make medical breakthrough in repairing tracheal damage

Investigators make medical breakthrough in repairing tracheal damage

Investigators at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have made a medical breakthrough using 3D printing on a MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer to create cartilage designed for tracheal repair or replacement. [More]
Plymouth researchers awarded grant to evaluate pulmonary rehabilitation programme in East Africa

Plymouth researchers awarded grant to evaluate pulmonary rehabilitation programme in East Africa

Chronic lung disease is a growing and debilitating health issue for countries in East Africa. Resulting from respiratory infections such as TB and HIV, and lifestyle problems such as tobacco smoking and poor nutrition, chronic lung disease affects one in five adults in Africa and is a major threat to health. [More]
Androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells can activate different gene set when bound to antiandrogens

Androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells can activate different gene set when bound to antiandrogens

The androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells can activate different sets of genes depending on whether it binds with an androgen hormone or an antiandrogen drug, according to a new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
New survey finds long-term benefits of brain surgery in patients with epilepsy

New survey finds long-term benefits of brain surgery in patients with epilepsy

Brain surgery for otherwise hard-to-treat epilepsy is effective for up to 15 years, according to a new survey by Henry Ford Hospital physicians. [More]
Purdue University researchers find promising way to treat late-stage prostate cancer

Purdue University researchers find promising way to treat late-stage prostate cancer

Low doses of metformin, a widely used diabetes medication, and a gene inhibitor known as BI2536 can successfully halt the growth of late-stage prostate cancer tumors, a Purdue University study finds. [More]
Yale researcher receives 2015 Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Biomedicine

Yale researcher receives 2015 Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Biomedicine

A Spanish foundation has awarded a major scientific prize to Yale researcher Joseph Schlessinger and two colleagues in recognition of their work leading to the first personalized treatments for cancer. The 2015 Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Biomedicine from the Madrid-based BBVA Foundation includes a €400,000 cash prize. [More]
Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company, today announced a national strategic partnership with the Clinton Health Matters Initiative, an initiative of the Clinton Foundation, that will help support its goal of cutting prescription drug-related deaths in half, saving approximately 10,000 lives over five years. [More]
CHLA researchers develop new protein-based therapy against drug-resistant leukemia cells

CHLA researchers develop new protein-based therapy against drug-resistant leukemia cells

Resistance of leukemia cells to contemporary chemotherapy is one of the most formidable obstacles to treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of childhood cancer. Now researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have designed and developed a new protein-based therapy they believe will prove highly effective against drug-resistant leukemia cells. [More]
Attaching Epirubicin drug to nanodiamonds eliminates chemoresistant cancer stem cells

Attaching Epirubicin drug to nanodiamonds eliminates chemoresistant cancer stem cells

A study led by the National University of Singapore found that attaching chemotherapy drug Epirubicin to nanodiamonds effectively eliminates chemoresistant cancer stem cells. The findings were first published online in ACS Nano, the official journal of the American Chemical Society, in December 2014. [More]
Research findings may accelerate work to safely control diabetes

Research findings may accelerate work to safely control diabetes

For those with diabetes, managing blood sugar is a balancing act -- if blood sugar is too high it raises the risk for nerve damage, blindness, kidney failure, and heart trouble, and if too low it can lead to a seizure or unconsciousness. [More]
International scientists take new path in epilepsy research

International scientists take new path in epilepsy research

An international team of scientists together with the University of Bonn Hospital have taken a new path in the research into causes of epilepsy: The researchers determined the networks of the active genes and, like a dragnet, looked for the "main perpetrators" using a computer model. [More]