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Study sheds light on the physical causes of sudden death

Study sheds light on the physical causes of sudden death

Sudden cardiac death accounts for approximately 10% of natural deaths, most of which are due to ventricular fibrillation. Each year it causes 300,000 deaths in the United States and 20,000 in Spain. [More]
Researchers explore benefits and risks of biosimilar antibodies

Researchers explore benefits and risks of biosimilar antibodies

In the emerging biosimilar market, biosimilar antibodies are being developed to treat conditions currently addressed by their original, targeted biological therapy. Only a few biosimilars are approved by the EMA, and just one has been approved by the FDA. In a review article, researchers used the clinical development data from one drug to explore the broader benefits and risks of these cost-effective, but as yet unfamiliar treatment options. [More]
Inflammation plays causal role in neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease

Inflammation plays causal role in neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease

About 15% of patients with Lyme disease develop peripheral and central nervous system involvement, often accompanied by debilitating and painful symptoms. New research indicates that inflammation plays a causal role in the array of neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease, according to a study published in The American Journal of Pathology. [More]
James Allison to be honored with 2015 Pezcoller Foundation-AACR International Award for Cancer Research

James Allison to be honored with 2015 Pezcoller Foundation-AACR International Award for Cancer Research

The 2015 Pezcoller Foundation-American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) International Award for Cancer Research will be presented to James P. Allison, PhD, at the AACR Annual Meeting 2015, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22. [More]
New method for measuring genetic variability may help identify patients with aggressive cancers

New method for measuring genetic variability may help identify patients with aggressive cancers

A new method for measuring genetic variability within a tumor might one day help doctors identify patients with aggressive cancers that are more likely to resist therapy, according to a study led by researchers now at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
Electronic micropump combined with anticonvulsant drug may treat brain diseases

Electronic micropump combined with anticonvulsant drug may treat brain diseases

Many potentially efficient drugs have been created to treat neurological disorders, but they cannot be used in practice. Typically, for a condition such as epilepsy, it is essential to act at exactly the right time and place in the brain. [More]
ChemRar, Lancet partner to develop and commercialize new medicines in Russia

ChemRar, Lancet partner to develop and commercialize new medicines in Russia

ChemRar High Tech Center, the Russian pharmaceutical investment and R&D group, and Lancet, Russian Distribution Company, have announced collaboration for research, development and commercialization of new medicines in Russia with the intention to stimulate the innovative development of the Russian pharmaceutical industry. [More]
Study paves way for greater understanding of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Study paves way for greater understanding of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Researchers at the Angiocardioneurology Department of the Neuromed Scientific Institute for Research, Hospitalisation and Health Care of Pozzilli (Italy), have found, in animal models, that the absence of a certain enzyme causes a syndrome resembling the Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). [More]
Patterns of DNA anomalies can predict outcomes in women with ovarian cancer

Patterns of DNA anomalies can predict outcomes in women with ovarian cancer

Nearly anyone touched by ovarian cancer will tell you: it's devastating. It's bad enough that cancer in almost 80 percent of patients reaches advanced stages before diagnosis, and that most patients are expected to die within five years. But just as painfully, roughly one quarter of women diagnosed have no warning that they are resistant to platinum-based chemotherapy, the main line of defense, nor that they will likely have 18 months to live. [More]
UAB research findings may lead to better treatment for women with HER2+ breast cancer

UAB research findings may lead to better treatment for women with HER2+ breast cancer

There are five subtypes of breast cancer, and they are distinct diseases with vastly different biologies that drastically alter their progression and responses to treatment. Understanding those differences is the starting point to a more effective, personalized treatment of breast cancer, which strikes more than 230,000 women in the U.S. each year. [More]
Yale University launches clinical study to evaluate personalized medicine for metastatic melanoma

Yale University launches clinical study to evaluate personalized medicine for metastatic melanoma

Yale University has launched a multicenter clinical trial, sponsored by Stand Up to Cancer and Melanoma Research Alliance, that will apply the latest in personalized medicine technology to treat metastatic melanoma. The trial, for which Yale is a lead site, will enroll patients lacking a particular genetic mutation for whom immune therapy did not work or was not an option. [More]
Research findings could bolster efforts to develop next gen of anti-viral treatments

Research findings could bolster efforts to develop next gen of anti-viral treatments

A newly developed spectroscopy method is helping to clarify the poorly understood molecular process by which an anti-HIV drug induces lethal mutations in the virus's genetic material. [More]
Itraconazole drug shows potential in cancer treatment

Itraconazole drug shows potential in cancer treatment

A common anti-fungal treatment has joined the ranks of drugs that may be suitable for use in treating cancer, according to research from the Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO) project published in ecancermedicalscience. [More]
New research links megalin protein with malignant melanomas

New research links megalin protein with malignant melanomas

Today it is not possible to predict spreading from malignant melanomas. Melanoma metastases are furthermore extremely difficult to eliminate as traditional treatment such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy is mostly ineffective. Only ten per cent of the patients survive once they reach an advanced stage with distant metastases. [More]
Novel findings may hold promise for children, adults with mitochondrial disorders

Novel findings may hold promise for children, adults with mitochondrial disorders

Rooted in malfunctions in the tiny power plants that energize our cells, mitochondrial disorders are notoriously complex and variable, with few effective treatments. Now, novel findings in microscopic worms may hold great promise for children and adults with mitochondrial disorders [More]

New set of molecules could carry medicines into cells

Just as a scientist dressed in a lab coat and goggles might get stuck behind the velvet rope at a trendy bar, many otherwise good drugs can't get inside cells if they don't look the part. In a report published this week in ACS Central Science, researchers report a new set of molecules that could ferry medicines into cells by taking on the right charge and shape, easily sliding past lipid membranes. [More]
Oxycodone-related deaths drop 25% after implementation of Prescription Drug Monitoring Program

Oxycodone-related deaths drop 25% after implementation of Prescription Drug Monitoring Program

Oxycodone-related deaths dropped 25 percent after Florida implemented its Prescription Drug Monitoring Program in late 2011 as part of its response to the state's prescription drug abuse epidemic, according to a team of UF Health researchers. The drop in fatalities could stem from the number of health care providers who used the program's database to monitor controlled substance prescriptions. [More]
NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

NIH-supported clinical trial to test statin use in patients with HIV-related cardiovascular disease

Researchers have begun enrolling participants in a multicenter international clinical trial to test whether statin administration can reduce the risk for major adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks, strokes, and heart disease, in people with HIV infection. The trial is supported by the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]
Changes in JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway drive ALK-negative ALCL

Changes in JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway drive ALK-negative ALCL

The first-ever systematic study of the genomes of patients with ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), a particularly aggressive form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, shows that many cases of the disease are driven by alterations in the JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway. [More]
SELLAS inks exclusive global collaboration, license agreement with TrojanTec

SELLAS inks exclusive global collaboration, license agreement with TrojanTec

SELLAS Life Sciences Group, a Swiss based, development-stage biopharmaceutical company with its main focus in developing innovative products for the treatment of various indications in Oncology and the Central Nervous System, today announced that it has signed an exclusive global collaboration and license agreement with TrojanTec Ltd, a UK-based Discovery Research and Development Company affiliated with Imperial College London, UK, for the development, marketing and commercialization of the innovative and proprietary TR-1 cancer therapeutic technology and drug. [More]
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