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Immature blood vessels linked to poor sunitinib response

Immature blood vessels linked to poor sunitinib response

Patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma with relatively mature blood vessels respond better to sunitinib and have fewer metastatic sites than those with immature vessels, a study has found. [More]
Amgen seeks FDA approval for leukemia drug blinatumomab

Amgen seeks FDA approval for leukemia drug blinatumomab

Amgen today announced submission of a Biologics License Application (BLA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration seeking approval for its investigational bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) antibody construct, blinatumomab. [More]
C-Path renews grant to advance more effective drug treatments for TB

C-Path renews grant to advance more effective drug treatments for TB

The Critical Path Institute, an independent, non-profit organization that works to accelerate the speed of drug and medical product development, today announced it has received a three-year grant renewal from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. [More]
MIT engineers find new strategy to combat superbugs

MIT engineers find new strategy to combat superbugs

In recent years, new strains of bacteria have emerged that resist even the most powerful antibiotics. Each year, these superbugs, including drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis and staphylococcus, infect more than 2 million people nationwide, and kill at least 23,000. Despite the urgent need for new treatments, scientists have discovered very few new classes of antibiotics in the past decade. [More]
New study sheds light on longstanding question about role of mitochondria in motor neuron diseases

New study sheds light on longstanding question about role of mitochondria in motor neuron diseases

A new study by researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine sheds light on a longstanding question about the role of mitochondria in debilitating and fatal motor neuron diseases and resulted in a new mouse model to study such illnesses. [More]
EYLEA Injection gets approval in Japan for treatment of myopic CNV

EYLEA Injection gets approval in Japan for treatment of myopic CNV

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that Bayer HealthCare's Japanese subsidiary, Bayer Yakuhin, Ltd. has received approval from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection for myopic choroidal neovascularization (myopic CNV). [More]
Viewpoints: Ezekiel Emanuel's choice of an age to die; new enrollment numbers still confusing

Viewpoints: Ezekiel Emanuel's choice of an age to die; new enrollment numbers still confusing

Seventy-five. That's how long I want to live: 75 years. This preference drives my daughters crazy. It drives my brothers crazy. My loving friends think I am crazy. They think that I can't mean what I say; that I haven't thought clearly about this, because there is so much in the world to see and do. To convince me of my errors, they enumerate the myriad people I know who are over 75 and doing quite well. They are certain that as I get closer to 75, I will push the desired age back to 80, then 85, maybe even 90. I am sure of my position. [More]
State highlights: Calif. readies new checks on foster kid psych meds; Kan. employment support for those with mental illness

State highlights: Calif. readies new checks on foster kid psych meds; Kan. employment support for those with mental illness

In a significant step toward curbing the overuse of psychiatric drugs in California's foster care system, doctors will soon be required to get extra authorization to prescribe antipsychotics, a new safeguard to protect some of the state's most overmedicated children. Beginning Oct. 1, a state pharmacist must verify the "medical necessity" of each antipsychotic prescription before the medications can be given to children who are 17 and younger and covered by Medi-Cal, the state's health program for the poor that also includes foster children (De Sa, 9/18). [More]
New research identifies novel cellular factors vital for CCHFV infection

New research identifies novel cellular factors vital for CCHFV infection

New research into the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV), a tick-borne virus which causes a severe hemorrhagic disease in humans similar to that caused by Ebolavirus, has identified new cellular factors essential for CCHFV infection. [More]
Researchers discover key cell-signaling pathway that contributes to development of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers discover key cell-signaling pathway that contributes to development of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at Jacksonville's campus of Mayo Clinic have discovered a defect in a key cell-signaling pathway they say contributes to both overproduction of toxic protein in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients as well as loss of communication between neurons - both significant contributors to this type of dementia. [More]
SLU pediatric researcher to study efficacy of new hepatitis C drug treatment in children

SLU pediatric researcher to study efficacy of new hepatitis C drug treatment in children

After the success of a new drug treatment in adults with hepatitis C infection, a Saint Louis University pediatric researcher is testing the safety and efficacy of the medications in children. [More]
Demand for $84,000 hepatitis C drug slows

Demand for $84,000 hepatitis C drug slows

Health care providers may be waiting for other, soon-to-be-released drugs to treat hepatitis C. Also, an Indian pharmaceutical company faces Justice Department questions on pricing data for Medicaid. [More]
Obama orders plan to reduce peril of antibiotic resistance

Obama orders plan to reduce peril of antibiotic resistance

The measures include incentives to develop new drugs, tighter control of existing ones and better tracking of resistant microbes. [More]
Viewpoints: Many beneficiaries of health law don't vote; reboot for healthcare.gov

Viewpoints: Many beneficiaries of health law don't vote; reboot for healthcare.gov

For starters, my strong hunch from my own reporting in the region over the past couple years-;including several trips to Kentucky for a new book on McConnell-;is that the Democrats' biggest problem in Appalachia and the Upland South is not that the people who are benefitting from Obamacare or would stand to benefit from it if their states fully implemented the law are voting against their own interests, for Republicans. [More]
Longer looks: Lithium in the water; controlling cancer; recovering from brain injury

Longer looks: Lithium in the water; controlling cancer; recovering from brain injury

There are many kinds of cancer, but treatments have typically combatted them in one way only: by attempting to destroy the cancerous cells. Surgery aims to remove the entire growth from the body; chemotherapy drugs are toxic to the cancer cells; radiation generates toxic molecules that break up the cancer cells' DNA and proteins, causing their demise. [More]
Exercise may have added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: Study

Exercise may have added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: Study

Study after study has proven it true: exercise is good for you. But new research from University of Pennsylvania scientists suggests that exercise may have an added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. [More]
Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine and The Wistar Institute have been awarded a prestigious $12.1 million SPORE grant from the National Cancer Institute. The five-year Specialized Programs of Research Excellence, or SPORE, grant will fund four new melanoma research projects that aim to translate fundamental laboratory discoveries into new therapeutics to treat melanoma and other skin cancers. [More]
New market research report on global and Chinese stem cell industry

New market research report on global and Chinese stem cell industry

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global and Chinese Stem Cell Industry Report, 2014-2017" report to their offering. [More]
Rosuvastatin promotes bone growth in mice with achondroplasia symptoms

Rosuvastatin promotes bone growth in mice with achondroplasia symptoms

Skeletal dysplasia is a group of rare diseases that afflict skeletal growth through abnormalities in bone and cartilage. Its onset hits at the fetal stage and is caused by genetic mutations. [More]
TSRI scientists devise new vancomycin-based antibiotic to rout resistant bacteria

TSRI scientists devise new vancomycin-based antibiotic to rout resistant bacteria

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have devised a new antibiotic based on vancomycin that is powerfully effective against vancomycin-resistant strains of MRSA and other disease-causing bacteria. [More]