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Rice-led research shows how migratory cancer cells acquire 'stem-like' properties

Rice-led research shows how migratory cancer cells acquire 'stem-like' properties

In the first study of its kind, Rice University researchers have mapped how information flows through the genetic circuits that cause cancer cells to become metastatic. The research reveals a common pattern in the decision-making that allows cancer cells to both migrate and form new tumors. Researchers say the commonality may open the door to new drugs that interfere with the genetic switches that cancer must flip to form both cancer stem cells and circulating tumor cells -- two of the main players in cancer metastasis. [More]
Johns Hopkins engineers invent lab device that yields microscopic look at metastasis

Johns Hopkins engineers invent lab device that yields microscopic look at metastasis

Johns Hopkins engineers have invented a lab device to give cancer researchers an unprecedented microscopic look at metastasis, the complex way that tumor cells spread through the body, causing more than 90 percent of cancer-related deaths. By shedding light on precisely how tumor cells travel, the device could uncover new ways to keep cancer in check. [More]
Scientists develop new system to treat a host of genetic conditions

Scientists develop new system to treat a host of genetic conditions

As potential next-generation therapeutics and research tools, few life sciences technologies hold more promise than genome-editing proteins – molecules that can be programmed to alter specific genes in order to treat or even cure genetic diseases. [More]
LAMA/LABA combination better than monotherapy for severe COPD

LAMA/LABA combination better than monotherapy for severe COPD

Combination treatment with umeclidinium bromide and vilanterol offers clinically meaningful improvements over tiotropium monotherapy for patients with moderate-to-very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, study data show. [More]
Study opens door to new treatments for brain diseases

Study opens door to new treatments for brain diseases

Delivering life-saving drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) might become a little easier thanks to a new report published in the November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal. [More]

Veloxis receives tentative FDA approval for Envarsus XR

Veloxis Pharmaceuticals A/S announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has informed Veloxis of the tentative approval of Envarsus XR. FDA stated that the final approval of Envarsus XR will be delayed until expiration of the exclusivity period for Astellas' Astagraf XL. [More]
Dosing of antiretroviral medication to prevent HIV infection differs by sex

Dosing of antiretroviral medication to prevent HIV infection differs by sex

A mathematical model developed by NIH grantees predicts that women must take the antiretroviral medication Truvada daily to prevent HIV infection via vaginal sex, whereas just two doses per week can protect men from HIV infection via anal sex. [More]
Insilico Medicine, CCARL and Plantbiosis partner to advance research on aging

Insilico Medicine, CCARL and Plantbiosis partner to advance research on aging

Through this unique partnership, the Baltimore-based Insilico Medicine and Lethbridge-based CCARL will provide expertise in aging research and build on the personalized medicine and drug discovery platforms OncoFinder and GeroScope to develop new systems for age-related diseases. [More]
Moffitt researcher uncovers new approach to treat cancer

Moffitt researcher uncovers new approach to treat cancer

The scientific community has made significant strides in recent years in identifying important genetic contributors to malignancy and developing therapeutic agents that target altered genes and proteins. A recent approach to treat cancer called synthetic lethality takes advantage of genetic alterations in cancer cells that make them more susceptible to certain drugs. [More]
Drug combination can trigger self-destruct process in lung cancer cells

Drug combination can trigger self-destruct process in lung cancer cells

Cancer Research UK scientists have found a drug combination that can trigger the self-destruct process in lung cancer cells - paving the way for new treatments, according to research that will be presented at the National Cancer Research Institute Cancer Conference in Liverpool next week. [More]
FDA recommens approval of Daiichi Sankyo's once-daily SAVAYSA for patients with NVAF

FDA recommens approval of Daiichi Sankyo's once-daily SAVAYSA for patients with NVAF

Daiichi Sankyo Company, Limited (hereafter, Daiichi Sankyo) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee voted 9 to 1 to recommend approval of once-daily SAVAYSA (edoxaban) 60 mg dosing regimen for the reduction in risk of stroke and systemic embolic events (SEE) in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). [More]
Neurocrine Biosciences' NBI-98854 drug gets breakthrough designation for tardive dyskinesia

Neurocrine Biosciences' NBI-98854 drug gets breakthrough designation for tardive dyskinesia

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation for its Vesicular Monoamine Transporter 2 inhibitor, NBI-98854, in tardive dyskinesia. [More]
Novel therapeutic approaches to improve thyroid cancer outcomes

Novel therapeutic approaches to improve thyroid cancer outcomes

Novel therapeutic approaches to improve outcomes in thyroid cancer, for example using targeted delivery of cytotoxic drugs to tumor cells, will be among the topics featured in oral and poster presentations delivered at the 84th Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association, October 29-November 2, 2014, in Coronado, California. [More]
Illicit drug use, tourism contribute to elevated HIV/AIDS risk in the Dominican Republic

Illicit drug use, tourism contribute to elevated HIV/AIDS risk in the Dominican Republic

The Caribbean has the second highest global human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence in the world outside of Sub-Saharan Africa, with HIV/AIDS as leading cause of death among people aged 20–59 years within the region. Particularly hard-hit are the Dominican Republic (DR) and Haiti, on the island of Hispaniola, accounting for approximately 70% of all people living with HIV in the Caribbean region. [More]
New blood test could predict early onset Alzheimer’s disease with high accuracy

New blood test could predict early onset Alzheimer’s disease with high accuracy

The research team previously identified that changes in the brain occur two decades before patients show signs of dementia. These changes can be detected through expensive brain imaging procedures. [More]

Researchers examine accuracy of GenoType MTBDRslassay for detection of drug-resistant TB

Researchers from the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group, hosted at LSTM, have conducted an independent review to examine the diagnostic accuracy of the GenoType MTBDRslassay for the detection of resistance to second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. [More]
Researchers describe new progress in treatment of brain cancer, other neurological diseases

Researchers describe new progress in treatment of brain cancer, other neurological diseases

A new technology that may assist in the treatment of brain cancer and other neurological diseases is the subject of an article in a recent issue of the journal Technology, published by World Scientific Publishing Company. [More]
'Mentor Mothers' program improves perinatal health outcomes in South Africa

'Mentor Mothers' program improves perinatal health outcomes in South Africa

The incidence of HIV infection in South Africa tops that of any nation in the world, with some 6 million of the country's nearly 50 million residents infected. Sadly, young women — and particularly young pregnant women — suffer some of the highest rates of HIV infection. More than one-fourth of pregnant South African women are infected with the virus; in some communities, the infection rates are even higher. [More]
Drug-loaded plaster delivers active agent to premature babies via membrane

Drug-loaded plaster delivers active agent to premature babies via membrane

The development of minimally and even non-invasive technologies is increasing in the medical field. It is now possible, for instance, to carry out a range of operative procedures using keyhole surgery with minimal use of the scalpel, leaving only tiny scars as a result. Similar opportunities are now becoming available when providing doses of active agents to patients – instead of using injections or probes to deliver drugs, it will in future be possible to supply them via a plaster which continuously, gently and painlessly delivers the required dosage through the skin. [More]
Mediterranean-style diets, physical activity can lower risk of first-time stroke

Mediterranean-style diets, physical activity can lower risk of first-time stroke

Eating Mediterranean or DASH-style diets, regularly engaging in physical activity and keeping your blood pressure under control can lower your risk of a first-time stroke, according to updated AHA/ASA guideline published in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke. [More]