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Vice President Biden to host Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C.

Vice President Biden to host Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C.

Vice President Biden and Dr. Jill Biden will host a Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C. at the White House. Cheryl Willman, MD, Director and CEO of The University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center, will attend. [More]
Oncogene signatures could help design new drug treatments for breast cancer

Oncogene signatures could help design new drug treatments for breast cancer

Drug treatments for breast cancer patients might soon be designed based on the unique genetic autograph of their tumor. [More]
KIT researchers develop 3D prostate model based on cryogels

KIT researchers develop 3D prostate model based on cryogels

A team of researchers led by Dr. Friederike J. Gruhl and Professor Andrew C. B. Cato at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology are developing a three-dimensional model for prostate cancer research based on cryogels. [More]
Primary care visits lead to more screenings and follow-up colonoscopies

Primary care visits lead to more screenings and follow-up colonoscopies

People who visit their primary care physicians are more likely to get potentially life-saving colon cancer screenings and follow up on abnormal stool blood test results - even in health systems that heavily promote mail-in home stool blood tests that don't require a doctor visit, a study involving UT Southwestern population health researchers shows. [More]
Researchers tune into previously unknown cross talk between estrogen and progesterone receptors

Researchers tune into previously unknown cross talk between estrogen and progesterone receptors

One of the first clues pathologists look for in tissue from a newly diagnosed breast cancer patient is the estrogen receptor, a nuclear protein that converts hormonal messages in the bloodstream into instructions for the cell about how to behave [More]
WHO violated sound standards of TB medical care, researchers say

WHO violated sound standards of TB medical care, researchers say

The World Health Organization (WHO) violated sound standards of medical care and human rights by nudging poorer countries to follow less expensive, untested and largely ineffective treatment protocols for tuberculosis patients, a new paper by researchers at Duke, Brandeis and Harvard universities argues. [More]
Mutant fruit flies provide insight into origins of Parkinson's disease

Mutant fruit flies provide insight into origins of Parkinson's disease

The neurodegeneration that occurs in Parkinson’s disease is a result of stress on the endoplasmic reticulum in the cell rather than failure of the mitochondria as previously thought, according to a study in fruit flies. [More]
New ultra-fast molecular method can help detect mycobacterial pathogens in the lungs

New ultra-fast molecular method can help detect mycobacterial pathogens in the lungs

What used to take several weeks is now possible in two days: Thanks to new molecular-based methods, mycobacterial pathogens that cause pulmonary infections or tuberculosis can now be detected much more quickly. [More]
Researchers identify new potential target for pancreatic cancer treatment

Researchers identify new potential target for pancreatic cancer treatment

Using an innovative approach to identify a cancer's genetic vulnerabilities by more swiftly analyzing human tumors transplanted into mice, researchers have identified a new potential target for pancreatic cancer treatment, published online in Cell Reports. [More]
New insights into cancer cell signaling could help prevent metastases

New insights into cancer cell signaling could help prevent metastases

Research published yesterday in Nature Communications has revealed a previously unknown mechanism by which metastasising cancer cells survive when they break away from the primary tumour. It is hoped that the discovery could help with the development of novel cancer treatments that prevent metastasis. [More]
Researchers reveal integrins could be key to survival mechanism in cancer cells

Researchers reveal integrins could be key to survival mechanism in cancer cells

Cancer cells appear to depend on an unusual survival mechanism to spread around the body, according to an early study led by Queen Mary University of London. The discovery could help with future development of novel treatments to prevent metastasis and secondary tumours. [More]
Positive environment can reverse trauma-related behavioral alterations in mice

Positive environment can reverse trauma-related behavioral alterations in mice

Traumatic experiences in childhood increase the risk of developing behavioral and psychiatric disorders later in life. It is also known that the consequences of a trauma can likewise be observed in the children of people affected even if those children have themselves not experienced any trauma. [More]
Yale-led study shows how EGFR silences tumor suppressor genes

Yale-led study shows how EGFR silences tumor suppressor genes

A Yale-led study describes how a known cancer gene, EGFR, silences genes that typically suppress tumors. The finding, published in Cell Reports, may lead to the development of more effective, individualized treatment for patients with lung cancer and other cancer types. [More]
Researchers develop new formulations for topical treatments of oral mucosal conditions

Researchers develop new formulations for topical treatments of oral mucosal conditions

On June 24, 2016, at the 94th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research, researcher W. Peter Holbrook, University of Iceland, will present a study titled "Development of Drugs for Local Treatment of Oral Conditions." The IADR General Session is being held in conjunction with the 3rd Meeting of the IADR Asia Pacific Region and the 35th Annual Meeting of the IADR Korean Division. [More]
Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Case reports on 13 cancer patients suggest that a small number of cancer patients taking the immunotherapy drugs ipilimumab and nivolumab may be at some higher-than-normal risk of developing autoimmune joint and tissue diseases, including inflammatory arthritis, according to a preliminary study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers. [More]
KARMA study confirms resistance to anti-malarial drugs confined to Southeast Asia

KARMA study confirms resistance to anti-malarial drugs confined to Southeast Asia

The first global mapping of artemisinin resistance has definitively confirmed that resistance to the main drug currently used in the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria is for the moment confined to Southeast Asia and has not spread to sub-Saharan Africa. [More]
Researchers engineer revolutionary new approach to combat cancer treatment resistance

Researchers engineer revolutionary new approach to combat cancer treatment resistance

Math, biology and nanotechnology are becoming strange, yet effective bed-fellows in the fight against cancer treatment resistance. Researchers at the University of Waterloo and Harvard Medical School have engineered a revolutionary new approach to cancer treatment that pits a lethal combination of drugs together into a single nanoparticle. [More]
JBMR article highlights controversies in treating high-risk osteoporosis patients

JBMR article highlights controversies in treating high-risk osteoporosis patients

The remarkable progress made over the past 30 years to reduce fractures and dramatically improve the quality of life for millions of osteoporosis patients is rapidly being reversed, say two bone health experts in a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research article published online today. [More]
New virtual reality simulator may help researchers learn more about ATV-related crashes

New virtual reality simulator may help researchers learn more about ATV-related crashes

A new virtual reality simulator will help University of Iowa researchers study how and why people lose control while driving all-terrain vehicles. [More]
Researchers use wristband sensors to detect how opioid users in emergency room reacted to dosages

Researchers use wristband sensors to detect how opioid users in emergency room reacted to dosages

There is merit in looking at the use of wearable biosensors to detect whether opioid users stay focused on their rehabilitation programs. [More]
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