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Researchers explore evolution of eardrums

Researchers explore evolution of eardrums

Researchers at the RIKEN Evolutionary Morphology Laboratory and the University of Tokyo in Japan have determined that the eardrum evolved independently in mammals and diapsids--the taxonomic group that includes reptiles and birds. Published in Nature Communications, the work shows that the mammalian eardrum depends on lower jaw formation, while that of diapsids develops from the upper jaw. [More]
World Veterans Federation supports approved technology for tinnitus relief among veterans

World Veterans Federation supports approved technology for tinnitus relief among veterans

TINNITUS, a debilitating "ringing in the ears", has become the No. 1 service- connected disability among veterans, surpassing post-traumatic stress disorder. [More]

Spirox closes $18.5 million Series B round of financing

Spirox Inc., a privately held medical device company, announced today the closing of an $18.5 million Series B round of financing led by Venrock and Aisling Capital. Existing investors Aperture Venture Partners, Correlation Ventures and Western Technology Investment also participated in the round. [More]
New method for measuring genetic variability may help identify patients with aggressive cancers

New method for measuring genetic variability may help identify patients with aggressive cancers

A new method for measuring genetic variability within a tumor might one day help doctors identify patients with aggressive cancers that are more likely to resist therapy, according to a study led by researchers now at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
Loyola otolaryngologist offers tips to identify, treat ear infection in children

Loyola otolaryngologist offers tips to identify, treat ear infection in children

Earaches in babies are not uncommon. But a baby's inability to communicate symptoms can leave most parents feeling helpless. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, three-fourths of babies will get at least one ear infection before the age of one. [More]
Orofacial pain specialists at Case Western Reserve University treat complex health issues

Orofacial pain specialists at Case Western Reserve University treat complex health issues

Andres Pinto, an orofacial pain and oral medicine specialist at Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine, often feels like the doctor in the television series House, who solves medical mysteries each week. [More]
Researchers report that echoes, fluctuations in volume help in judging sound distance

Researchers report that echoes, fluctuations in volume help in judging sound distance

Mammals are good at figuring out which direction a sound is coming from, whether it's a rabbit with a predator breathing down its neck or a baby crying for its mother. But how we judge how far away that sound is was a mystery until now. Researchers from UConn Health report in the 1 April issue of the Journal of Neuroscience that echoes and fluctuations in volume (amplitude modulation) are the cues we use to figure the distance between us and the source of a noise. [More]
UT Arlington electrical engineer developing low-power integrated circuit for directional hearing aids

UT Arlington electrical engineer developing low-power integrated circuit for directional hearing aids

A University of Texas at Arlington electrical engineering researcher is developing a more efficient, low-power integrated circuit for directional hearing aids that will lead to a better quality of life for hearing impaired people. [More]
Study reveals link between dietary magnesium intake and diabetes-related health outcomes

Study reveals link between dietary magnesium intake and diabetes-related health outcomes

A recent analysis published in the Journal of Human Nutrition & Food Science reveals a beneficial relationship between dietary magnesium intake and diabetes-related outcomes including decreased risk for metabolic syndrome, obesity or overweight, elevated blood pressure, and reduced HDL (good) cholesterol. [More]
Allen Institute for Brain Science leads international effort to advance analysis of single neurons

Allen Institute for Brain Science leads international effort to advance analysis of single neurons

The Allen Institute for Brain Science is spearheading a landmark international effort to define and advance the state-of-the-art digital reconstruction and analysis of single neurons. The project launching today, called BigNeuron, aims to create reliable high-throughput and quantitative 3D reconstructions of the thousands of branches that make up individual neurons: a crucial step to ultimately understanding how the brain encodes information. [More]
Two different fat grafting approaches have similar effects in reversing signs of aging skin

Two different fat grafting approaches have similar effects in reversing signs of aging skin

Two approaches to fat grafting--injection of fat cells versus fat-derived stem cells--have similar effects in reversing the cellular-level signs of aging skin, reports a study in the April issue of , the official medical journal of the [More]
Wearable collision warning device may help patients with peripheral vision loss

Wearable collision warning device may help patients with peripheral vision loss

People who have lost some of their peripheral vision, such as those with retinitis pigmentosa, glaucoma, or brain injury that causes half visual field loss, often face mobility challenges and increased likelihood of falls and collisions. [More]
Study explores outcomes of thyroid surgery in professional singers

Study explores outcomes of thyroid surgery in professional singers

A diagnosis of thyroid cancer can be devastating to professional singers, because surgical removal of the thyroid commonly causes voice changes. Massachusetts Eye and Ear surgeons developed a neural monitoring system to be used intraoperatively to improve outcomes. [More]

New semi-transparent patch delivers effective treatment for tinnitus

Sufferers of tinnitus - an uncontrollable ringing in the ears - are getting some golden silence as Swedish scientists reveal a new treatment for the condition. [More]
UL GEMS students host third annual Teddy Bear Hospital event for primary school children

UL GEMS students host third annual Teddy Bear Hospital event for primary school children

Medical School students at the University of Limerick today hosted the University’s annual Teddy Bear Hospital (TBH) with over 400 Limerick’s primary school children from 6 different schools and their teddy bears. The aim of the event, which has been organised by six current Graduate Entry Medical School (GEMS) students with a particular interest in childhood medicine, is to alleviate childhood anxiety about the medical environment, its procedures and the professionals that work within it. [More]
New study show how baking soda can also improve vision

New study show how baking soda can also improve vision

Bicarbonate (baking soda) makes sparkling water sparkle, causes bread to rise, absorbs odors and can be used for cleaning all sorts of stuff, including your teeth. In the body, it plays essential roles in buffering pH, aiding in digestion and neutralizing lactic acid produced during physical exertion. Much of the bicarbonate in our bodies comes from carbon dioxide, which is produced as a waste product in all cells, although some is ingested with carbonated beverages and certain types of foods. [More]
GW, Children's National researchers awarded $6.2 million grant to solve pediatric dysphagia

GW, Children's National researchers awarded $6.2 million grant to solve pediatric dysphagia

An interdisciplinary group of researchers from the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences and Children's National Health System has been awarded a program project grant (PPG) for $6.2 million from The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to solve pediatric dysphagia -- a chronic difficulty with feeding and swallowing in children. [More]
Finding could lead to more effective, less invasive treatment for 'bubble boy' disease

Finding could lead to more effective, less invasive treatment for 'bubble boy' disease

For infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), something as simple as a common cold or ear infection can be fatal. Born with an incomplete immune system, kids who have SCID--also known as "bubble boy" or "bubble baby" disease--can't fight off even the mildest of germs. [More]
Multimodal approach to distinguish people with autism spectrum disorder

Multimodal approach to distinguish people with autism spectrum disorder

In an ancient Indian parable, a group of blind men touches different parts of a large animal to find what it is. Only when they share the descriptions of an ear, tail, trunk and leg do they know it is an elephant. [More]
Researchers discover retina protein crucial for vision

Researchers discover retina protein crucial for vision

Research led by Nicolas Bazan, MD, PhD, Boyd Professor and Director of the LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence, discovered a protein in the retina that is crucial for vision. The paper reports, for the first time, the key molecular mechanisms leading to visual degeneration and blindness. [More]
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