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Harvard Medical School scientists reveal structure of vesicular stomatitis virus protein

Harvard Medical School scientists reveal structure of vesicular stomatitis virus protein

Viruses need us. In order to multiply, viruses have to invade a host cell and copy their genetic information. To do so, viruses encode their own replication machinery or components that subvert the host replication machinery to their advantage. [More]
Afamelanotide treatment improves quality of life in people with erythropoietic protoporphyria

Afamelanotide treatment improves quality of life in people with erythropoietic protoporphyria

A novel synthetic hormone that makes certain skin cells produce more melanin significantly increases pain-free sun exposure in people with erythropoietic protoporphyria, a rare, genetic disorder resulting in excruciating pain within minutes of sun exposure. [More]
Dr. Jian-Dong Li receives $1.6 million to develop novel therapeutic targets to treat middle-ear infections

Dr. Jian-Dong Li receives $1.6 million to develop novel therapeutic targets to treat middle-ear infections

Dr. Jian-Dong Li, a professor and director of the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Inflammation and Immunity, has received a five-year, $1.6 million federal grant to develop novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics against middle-ear infections. [More]
Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

For decades, researchers in the genetics field have theorized that the protein spools around which DNA is wound, histones, remain constant in the brain, never changing after development in the womb. [More]
Study reveals positive long-term effects of new facelift technique in comparison to autologous fat transfers

Study reveals positive long-term effects of new facelift technique in comparison to autologous fat transfers

Patients striving to look younger for longer can now benefit from the same great results in fewer surgical procedures and at a lower cost. [More]
Rare genetic variants in A2ML1 gene responsible for chronic middle ear infections, say researchers

Rare genetic variants in A2ML1 gene responsible for chronic middle ear infections, say researchers

Many parents have heard the night-time cry of "my ear hurts." For some children, this might happen frequently beginning in infancy and even persist into adulthood. An international consortium led by those at Baylor College of Medicine may have taken the first step on the road to understanding why only some people get frequent painful or chronic middle ear infections. The culprit may be rare genetic variants in a gene called A2ML1. [More]
Lamont R Jones receives 2015 Research Scholar Award to study pathogenesis of keloids

Lamont R Jones receives 2015 Research Scholar Award to study pathogenesis of keloids

Lamont R Jones, M.D., vice chair of the Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at Henry Ford Hospital, received the 2015 Research Scholar Award from the Educational and Research Foundation for the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery to continue his efforts to study the pathogenesis of keloids and improve understanding of how keloid scars develop. [More]
Cochlear Nucleus 6 Sound Processor approved by FDA for use with Nucleus 22 Cochlear Implant

Cochlear Nucleus 6 Sound Processor approved by FDA for use with Nucleus 22 Cochlear Implant

Cochlear Limited, the global leader in implantable hearing solutions, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the Cochlear™ Nucleus® 6 Sound Processor for use with the Nucleus 22 Cochlear Implant, giving those who have worn cochlear implants from the beginning (over 20 years in some cases) access to the latest breakthroughs in true wireless and automatic hearing. Released in 1985, the Nucleus 22 Implant was the first commercially available multi-channel cochlear implant in the world. [More]
Annual LDCT screening safe, effective for monitoring patients with nonsolid lung nodules

Annual LDCT screening safe, effective for monitoring patients with nonsolid lung nodules

An annual exam using a key imaging technology could spare patients with lung nodules from unnecessary tests and surgery, while identifying the cases where the nodules are likely to become cancerous, according to a new study by researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS) and published online today in journal Radiology. [More]
Cardiac device wearers ought to keep safe distance from smartphones to prevent unwanted painful shocks

Cardiac device wearers ought to keep safe distance from smartphones to prevent unwanted painful shocks

Cardiac device wearers should keep a safe distance from smartphones to avoid unwanted painful shocks or pauses in function, reveals research presented today at EHRA EUROPACE -- CARDIOSTIM 2015 by Dr. Carsten Lennerz, first author and cardiology resident in the Clinic for Heart and Circulatory Diseases, German Heart Centre, Munich, Germany. [More]
Researchers study effect of graphic novella in preventing hearing loss among Spanish-speaking ag workers

Researchers study effect of graphic novella in preventing hearing loss among Spanish-speaking ag workers

Graphic novels usually conjure up dark images of superheroes cleaning up the mean streets of Gotham or Metropolis. Mark Guiberson may not be a superhero, but he is trying to improve life for a particular population. [More]
Discovery provides clue to long-held mystery about how animals' internal compasses function

Discovery provides clue to long-held mystery about how animals' internal compasses function

A team of scientists and engineers at The University of Texas at Austin has identified the first sensor of the Earth's magnetic field in an animal, finding in the brain of a tiny worm a big clue to a long-held mystery about how animals' internal compasses work. [More]
Study explores 'laser welding' for sealing corneal transplants

Study explores 'laser welding' for sealing corneal transplants

Some 30,000 years ago, prehistoric man wielded animal bones as needles to suture otherwise lethal wounds. This tactic has been used, and improved upon, over time and remains the basis of surgical procedures conducted today. Even with radical new surgical techniques, which rely on metallic and polymeric staples or chemical adhesives to seal incisions, infection and permanent scarring remain major concerns. The success of any wound closure is entirely dependent on the physician's skill set alone. [More]
Oxygen regulatory pathway can act to trigger tissue regeneration in mice

Oxygen regulatory pathway can act to trigger tissue regeneration in mice

A study led by Ellen Heber-Katz, PhD, of the Lankenau Institute for Medical Research, part of Main Line Health, shows that a primordial form of energy production that still exists in mammals can be harnessed to achieve spontaneous tissue regeneration in mice, without the need for added stem cells. [More]
University of Bonn researchers find way to stimulate larynx muscles using light

University of Bonn researchers find way to stimulate larynx muscles using light

Researchers at the University of Bonn have found a way to stimulate the larynx muscles of mice using light. In the long term, this method could be an option for the treatment of laryngeal paralysis, which causes difficulties in phonation and breathing. Their findings will be published in the scientific journal "Nature Communications." [More]
Northeastern University researchers report two approaches to eradicate Lyme disease

Northeastern University researchers report two approaches to eradicate Lyme disease

North­eastern Uni­ver­sity researchers have found that the bac­terium that causes Lyme dis­ease forms dor­mant per­sister cells, which are known to evade antibi­otics. This sig­nif­i­cant finding, they said, could help explain why it's so dif­fi­cult to treat the infec­tion in some patients. [More]
Fennec presents positive interim results from phase III trial of sodium thiosulphate at ASCO 2015

Fennec presents positive interim results from phase III trial of sodium thiosulphate at ASCO 2015

Fennec Pharmaceuticals, Inc., announced the presentation of positive interim results from a poster presented today entitled, "Anti-tumor efficacy in SIOPEL6: A multi-centre open label randomised phase III trial of the efficacy of sodium thiosulphate (STS) in reducing ototoxicity in patients receiving cisplatin (Cis) monotherapy for standard risk hepatoblastoma (SR-HB)." [More]
New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai observes June 1st as World Orthoptics Day

New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai observes June 1st as World Orthoptics Day

New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai joins with the International Orthoptic Association to observe June 1st as World Orthoptics Day. [More]
New investments may enable two Canadian organizations to improve life for people with hearing loss

New investments may enable two Canadian organizations to improve life for people with hearing loss

New investments from public and private sources in Canada and the USA, including Grand Challenges Canada and Google.org, will enable two Canadian organizations to contribute to a better life for people with hearing loss in developing countries. [More]
Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

A technique called auditory brainstem implantation can restore hearing for patients who can't benefit from cochlear implants. A team of US and Japanese experts has mapped out the surgical anatomy and approaches for auditory brainstem implantation in the June issue of Operative Neurosurgery, published on behalf of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
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