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Breast milk may thwart diarrhea and reduce risk of ear infections in infants

Breast milk may thwart diarrhea and reduce risk of ear infections in infants

Feeding at the breast may be healthier than feeding pumped milk from a bottle for reducing the risk of ear infection, and feeding breast milk compared with formula may reduce the risk of diarrhea, according to a recent study by researchers at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital. [More]
Research provides pathway toward creation of first broad-spectrum antiviral drug

Research provides pathway toward creation of first broad-spectrum antiviral drug

By studying the rare person -- about one in a million -- who can fight off viral infections more effectively than everyone else, investigators at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed a strategy to help the rest of us achieve this enhanced anti-viral state. [More]
Action on Hearing Loss funds new study to discover ways of preventing deafness caused by cancer drug

Action on Hearing Loss funds new study to discover ways of preventing deafness caused by cancer drug

A widely used anti-cancer drug, cisplatin, can cause permanent and severe hearing loss, having a devastating impact on the quality of life for cancer survivors. [More]
Effective chemotherapeutic drug may induce permanent hearing loss in Cockayne syndrome individuals

Effective chemotherapeutic drug may induce permanent hearing loss in Cockayne syndrome individuals

The chemotherapy drug cisplatin can kill cancer, but it can also cause permanent hearing loss. [More]
Researchers use high-power prisms to design new eyeglasses to expand visual fields of hemianopia patients

Researchers use high-power prisms to design new eyeglasses to expand visual fields of hemianopia patients

Researchers from the Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School have designed three new eyeglasses using high-power prisms to optimally expand the visual fields of patients with hemianopia, a condition in which the visual fields of both eyes are cut by half. [More]
Serum biomarkers can help predict risk of IBD development and complications

Serum biomarkers can help predict risk of IBD development and complications

Years before inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is diagnosed and symptoms exist, biomarkers are already circulating that can help predict risk not only of disease development but also of complications, according to research published online last week, which will also appear in the June 15th print issue of Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. [More]
Common misconception about penicillin allergies

Common misconception about penicillin allergies

It's time for your primary care check-up, and the doctor asks you to list any known drug allergies. "Penicillin," you say immediately, although you can't remember actually taking the drug or having a reaction to it—it was your parents who said so. According to a Texas A&M Health Science Center allergist, many people who believe they're allergic to this antibiotic may not actually be allergic at all. [More]
Study estimates 30% of outpatient oral antibiotic prescription in the U.S as inappropriate

Study estimates 30% of outpatient oral antibiotic prescription in the U.S as inappropriate

An estimated 30 percent of outpatient oral antibiotic prescriptions in the U.S. in 2010-2011 may have been inappropriate, findings that support the need for establishing a goal for outpatient antibiotic stewardship, according to a study appearing in the May 3 issue of JAMA. [More]
Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Scientists have used a novel gene therapy to halt the progression of pulmonary hypertension, a form of high blood pressure in the lung blood vessels that is linked to heart failure, according to a study led by Roger J. Hajjar, MD, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Cardiovascular Research Center at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Acid suppression drugs frequently prescribed for high-risk newborns, study shows

Acid suppression drugs frequently prescribed for high-risk newborns, study shows

Since 2006, several published studies have associated the use of some acid suppression medications in hospitalized high-risk babies with infections, necrotizing enterocolitis and increased risk of death. Those medications - histamine-2 receptor antagonists, such as ranitidine (Zantac and others), and proton pump inhibitors, such as esomeprazole (Nexium and others) - were originally approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in adults and older children. [More]

Sense announces official launch of new deafblind awareness e-learning course for audiologists

Sense, the national deafblind charity, has today announced the official launch of its new deafblind awareness e-learning course, specifically designed for audiologists. [More]
Hearing socially meaningful sounds can modify ear’s ability to pick up those signals

Hearing socially meaningful sounds can modify ear’s ability to pick up those signals

Hearing socially meaningful sounds can change the ear and enable it to better detect those sounds, according to researchers at Georgia State University who studied the phenomenon in green treefrogs. [More]
UK charity Action on Hearing Loss funds new project to develop medicines for hearing loss

UK charity Action on Hearing Loss funds new project to develop medicines for hearing loss

Today, UK charity Action on Hearing Loss announces a major investment to fund a new project to develop medicines to treat age-related hearing loss and noise-induced hearing loss at BioTrinity 2016 – Europe’s Leading Investment and Biopartnering Conference. [More]
RA patients more likely to experience hearing loss

RA patients more likely to experience hearing loss

RA is the commonest autoimmune arthritis affecting 1% of the general population. Despite its main articular manifestations, RA caninvolveextra-articular organs including the auditory system. [More]
Newly developed smartphone application may potentially benefit low-vision users

Newly developed smartphone application may potentially benefit low-vision users

Researchers from the Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School have developed a smartphone application that projects a magnified smartphone screen to Google Glass, which users can navigate using head movements to view a corresponding portion of the magnified screen. They have shown that the technology can potentially benefit low-vision users, many of whom find the smartphone's built-in zoom feature to be difficult to use due to the loss of context. Their results are published online in the journal IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering. [More]
Under-expressed miR-9 gene may contribute to schizophrenia risk

Under-expressed miR-9 gene may contribute to schizophrenia risk

By turning skin cells into brain neurons, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have identified that certain tiny molecules aiding in gene expression, known as microRNAs (miRNAs), are under-expressed in the brains of the 14 schizophrenia patients they studied. Their findings, published online today in the journal Cell Reports, show that one of these molecules, a miRNA known as miR-9, is a risk factor that controls the activity of hundreds of genes. [More]
Bacteria-derived gut metabolites can affect brain’s myelin content and induce depression-like symptoms

Bacteria-derived gut metabolites can affect brain’s myelin content and induce depression-like symptoms

Specific combinations of gut bacteria produce substances that affect myelin content and cause social avoidance behaviors in mice, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in the medical journal eLife. This research suggests that targeting intestinal bacteria, or their metabolites, could be one way to treat debilitating psychiatric disorders and demyelinating diseases, like multiple sclerosis. [More]
Scientists identify pSTS region in the brain responsible for recognizing human facial expressions

Scientists identify pSTS region in the brain responsible for recognizing human facial expressions

Researchers at The Ohio State University have pinpointed the area of the brain responsible for recognizing human facial expressions. [More]
OASIS study to investigate link between SIDS and alteration on newborn hearing screen test

OASIS study to investigate link between SIDS and alteration on newborn hearing screen test

Seattle Children's is partnering on the launch of a study called the 'Oto-Acoustic Signals in SIDS'study that will investigate a possible association between Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and hearing alteration on the newborn hearing screen test. [More]
New Lullaby Trust-funded study could prevent sudden, unexpected deaths of babies and children

New Lullaby Trust-funded study could prevent sudden, unexpected deaths of babies and children

An innovative new study funded by The Lullaby Trust is being launched, which could have profound implications for preventing the sudden and unexpected deaths of babies and children. [More]
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