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Novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation reduces depressive symptoms

Novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation reduces depressive symptoms

Researchers of a new study published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry report successful reduction of depressive symptoms in patients using a novel non-invasive method of vagus nerve stimulation, or VNS. [More]
New drug cocktail may show promise in NSCLC patients

New drug cocktail may show promise in NSCLC patients

A drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration for melanoma in combination with a common cholesterol-lowering drug may show promise in controlling cancer growth in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to new research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Mount Sinai researchers report new method to restore microbiome of newborns delivered via C-section

Mount Sinai researchers report new method to restore microbiome of newborns delivered via C-section

Scientists from the Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, collaborating with NYU Langone Medical Center and a multi-center team of researchers, demonstrated for the first time that the microbiome of newborn babies delivered via cesarean section (C-section) can be partially restored to resemble that of vaginally delivered infants. [More]

New portable device enables transmission of medical data from patients to health professionals

The first University-Industry Cooperative Research Venture, Conecson Co., Ltd. has been officially launched at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Korea, on Tuesday, January 19th, 2016. [More]
Brain's natural plasticity could compensate for inner ear damage

Brain's natural plasticity could compensate for inner ear damage

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School have described, for the first time, the adult brain's ability to compensate for a near-complete loss of auditory nerve fibers that link the ear to the brain. The findings, published in the current issue of Neuron, suggest that the brain's natural plasticity can compensate for inner ear damage to bring sound detection abilities back within normal limits; however, it does not recover speech intelligibility. [More]
Nearly 3.3 million children in U.S. have dizziness or balance problem

Nearly 3.3 million children in U.S. have dizziness or balance problem

More than 1 in 20 (nearly 3.3 million) children between the ages of 3 and 17 have a dizziness or balance problem, according to an analysis of the first large-scale, nationally representative survey of these problems in U.S. children. [More]
Dartmouth investigators show how vestibular system's horizontal canals influence navigation

Dartmouth investigators show how vestibular system's horizontal canals influence navigation

Dartmouth researchers have found the first direct evidence showing how the vestibular system's horizontal canals play a key role in sensing our direction in the environment. [More]
Concussions related to sports and recreation activities affect millions of Americans

Concussions related to sports and recreation activities affect millions of Americans

Every year, between 3 million and 4 million Americans suffer concussions in sports and recreation. Head impacts and concussions caused by contact sports are a quickly growing epidemic among young athletes. [More]
Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

World-renowned cardiologist Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, is undertaking a three-year study, known as the TANSNIP-PESA study, to determine whether a workplace-based lifestyle intervention, accompanied by imaging data, will lead to a reduction in the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease risk factors related to lifestyle. [More]
Salvat, Lee's Pharmaceutical partner to market Duoxal ear drops in Greater China

Salvat, Lee's Pharmaceutical partner to market Duoxal ear drops in Greater China

Laboratorios SALVAT, S.A. and Lee's Pharmaceutical (HK) Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lee's Pharmaceutical Holdings Limited, jointly announced today the signing of an exclusive License and Supply Agreement for the marketing and distribution of Duoxal ear drops (patented combination solution of Ciprofloxacin and Fluocinolone Acetonide) in the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong S.A.R., Macau S.A.R., and Taiwan and an option to add Thailand to the contractual territory. [More]
Three new genetic associations identified for primary open angle glaucoma

Three new genetic associations identified for primary open angle glaucoma

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have led an international effort to identify three genetic associations that influence susceptibility to primary open angle glaucoma -- the most common form of adult onset glaucoma and the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. [More]
NIH-funded analysis identifies three genes that contribute to most common form of glaucoma

NIH-funded analysis identifies three genes that contribute to most common form of glaucoma

An analysis funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, has identified three genes that contribute to the most common type of glaucoma. The study increases the total number of such genes to 15. [More]
Strathspey Crown Holdings announces acquisition of Novus Via assets

Strathspey Crown Holdings announces acquisition of Novus Via assets

Strathspey Crown Holdings LLC announced today the acquisition of the portfolio companies of Novus Via LP, a Nevada-based venture capital investment firm focused on end-stage development and commercialization of advanced electromagnetic and electrochemical technologies spanning healthcare, clean energy and coherent acoustics. The terms of the transaction were not disclosed. [More]
Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy superior to other surveillance methods in detecting dysplasia in IBD patients

Chromoendoscopy is superior to random biopsy or white-light colonoscopy in detecting dysplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), according to a long-term surveillance study led by James F. Marion, MD, Professor of Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Director of Education and Outreach at The Susan and Leonard Feinstein Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical Center at The Mount Sinai Hospital, published online in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. [More]
Head-down yoga positions fatal for glaucoma patients

Head-down yoga positions fatal for glaucoma patients

Glaucoma patients may experience increased eye pressure as the result of performing several different head-down positions while practicing yoga, according to a new study published by researchers at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Palliative care improves care quality, reduces costs for advanced cancer patients with comorbidities

Palliative care improves care quality, reduces costs for advanced cancer patients with comorbidities

Patients with incurable cancer and numerous other serious health conditions who consulted with a palliative care team within two days of hospitalization had significant savings in hospital costs, according to a new study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Naturally occurring changes in brain wiring can help patients avert onset of bipolar disorder

Naturally occurring changes in brain wiring can help patients avert onset of bipolar disorder

Naturally occurring changes in brain wiring can help patients at high genetic risk of developing bipolar disorder avert the onset of the illness, according to a new study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online today in the journal Translational Psychiatry. [More]
Study shows clear role of bacteria in modulating immune function in the lungs

Study shows clear role of bacteria in modulating immune function in the lungs

Microbiota--the trillions of bacteria that co-exist in the body--regulate the ability of lung dendritic cells to generate immune responses, according to a study led by researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, published online in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Good bacteria can help inhibit growth of S. pneumoniae

Good bacteria can help inhibit growth of S. pneumoniae

A new study from the Forsyth Institute is helping to shed more light on the important connections among the diverse bacteria in our microbiome. According to research published in mBio, scientists at Forsyth, led by Dr. Katherine P. Lemon, along with their collaborator at Vanderbilt University, have demonstrated that a harmless bacterium found in the nose and on skin may negatively impact the growth of a pathogen that commonly causes middle ear infections in children and pneumonia in children and older adults. [More]
FDA permits Sound Pharmaceuticals to start SPI-1005 clinical trial for treatment of Meniere's Disease

FDA permits Sound Pharmaceuticals to start SPI-1005 clinical trial for treatment of Meniere's Disease

Sound Pharmaceuticals is pleased to announce that it began enrolling a clinical trial to test SPI-1005 in the treatment of Meniere's Disease (MD). MD or idiopathic endolymphatic hydrops is an inner ear disease that involves episodic vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, and tinnitus. [More]
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