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Simple, non-invasive test may help screen young children for hearing deficits linked to autism

Simple, non-invasive test may help screen young children for hearing deficits linked to autism

Researchers have identified an inner ear deficiency in children with Autism that may impact their ability to recognize speech. [More]
Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

A multicenter team of researchers led by Barbara Murphy, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has identified a panel of genes which can help predict whether a transplanted kidney will later develop fibrosis, an injury which can cause the organ to fail. Their results were published in the July 21 edition of Lancet. [More]
Buprenorphine implants could be effective option to treat adults with opioid dependence

Buprenorphine implants could be effective option to treat adults with opioid dependence

While buprenorphine has long been used to treat adults with opioid dependence, its efficacy can be hindered by lack of adherence to daily, sublingual (beneath the tongue) doses of the medication. [More]
New method helps characterize immune cells in tumor tissues

New method helps characterize immune cells in tumor tissues

Despite recent achievements in the development of cancer immunotherapies, only a small group of patients typically respond to them. Predictive markers of disease course and response to immunotherapy are urgently needed. [More]
Tecnis Symfony Extended Range of Vision IOL approved for cataract patients

Tecnis Symfony Extended Range of Vision IOL approved for cataract patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first intraocular lens (IOL) that provides cataract patients with an extended depth-of-focus, which helps improve their sharpness of vision (visual acuity) at near, intermediate and far distances. [More]
Study shows parvalbumin-interneurons in the amygdala influence fear memory encoding

Study shows parvalbumin-interneurons in the amygdala influence fear memory encoding

Fear memory encoding, the process responsible for persistent reactions to trauma-associated cues, is influenced by a sparse but potent population of inhibitory cells called parvalbumin-interneurons (PV-INs) in the amygdala, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online July 14 in the journal Neuron. [More]
Study finds high prevalence of tinnitus among adolescents

Study finds high prevalence of tinnitus among adolescents

Teenagers are increasingly experiencing tinnitus, often a symptom of hearing loss, as a result of using ear buds to listen to music for long periods every day, as well as frequenting very noisy places like nightclubs, discos and rock concerts, according to a study performed in Brazil. [More]
New, minimally invasive procedure may be effective for patients with FED

New, minimally invasive procedure may be effective for patients with FED

A new, minimally invasive procedure appears to be effective for many patients with Fuchs endothelial dystrophy (FED), a common eye disease, without the potential side effects and cost of the current standard of care, a cornea transplant. [More]
Scientists discover new biological defense system against pathogenic microorganisms

Scientists discover new biological defense system against pathogenic microorganisms

For the first time in the world, a group of researchers discovered a human immune receptor, which detects the invasion of pathogenic microorganisms. [More]
TBI with LOC linked to late-life neurodegeneration but not Alzheimer's disease

TBI with LOC linked to late-life neurodegeneration but not Alzheimer's disease

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) with a loss of consciousness (LOC) may be associated with later development of Parkinson's disease but not Alzheimer's disease or incident dementia, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the University of Washington School of Medicine. [More]
Study reveals higher health care costs for obese preschoolers than healthy weight children

Study reveals higher health care costs for obese preschoolers than healthy weight children

Obese children aged two to five years old are 2-3 times more likely to be admitted to hospital and have 60 per cent higher healthcare costs than healthy weight children, a study by the University of Sydney's School of Public Health has found. [More]
New software may help doctors access multiple patient files for cancer treatment

New software may help doctors access multiple patient files for cancer treatment

Doctors increasingly work with large quantities of digitized patient data - and yet the insights it contains often remain unexploited. Fraunhofer researchers have developed a software program that allows doctors to extract information from multiple patient files to quickly obtain new pointers for the treatment of prostate cancer. [More]
Safety tips to prevent injuries from fireworks during summer

Safety tips to prevent injuries from fireworks during summer

Fireworks can result in severe burns, scars and disfigurement that can last a lifetime. [More]
Researchers design E. coli-based transport capsule to help fight pneumococcal disease

Researchers design E. coli-based transport capsule to help fight pneumococcal disease

Most people recoil at the thought of ingesting E. coli. But what if the headline-grabbing bacteria could be used to fight disease? [More]
Undiagnosed hearing issues may lead to social isolation, cognitive impairment in seniors

Undiagnosed hearing issues may lead to social isolation, cognitive impairment in seniors

Senior citizens with undiagnosed or untreated hearing problems are more likely to suffer from social isolation and cognitive impairment, a UBC study has found. [More]
Scientists explore why some kids respond better to cochlear implants than others

Scientists explore why some kids respond better to cochlear implants than others

Four-year-old William Wootton was born profoundly deaf, but thanks to cochlear implants fitted when he was about 18 months old, the Granite Bay preschooler plays with a keyboard synthesizer and reacts to the sounds of airplanes and trains, while still learning American Sign Language. [More]
Novel therapeutic approach may be effective for disrupting bacterial biofilms

Novel therapeutic approach may be effective for disrupting bacterial biofilms

Biofilms are communities of bacteria that adhere to a surface and are nearly impossible to eradicate when they are pathogenic, or disease-causing. [More]
Surgeons outline complete face transplant procedure in facial burn patients

Surgeons outline complete face transplant procedure in facial burn patients

Last year, the most extensive clinical face transplant to date was successfully carried out at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Researchers identify exact origin of 2009 swine H1N1 flu pandemic

Researchers identify exact origin of 2009 swine H1N1 flu pandemic

The 2009 swine H1N1 flu pandemic — responsible for more than 17,000 deaths worldwide — originated in pigs from a very small region in central Mexico, a research team headed by investigators at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is reporting. [More]
Cisplatin-based chemotherapy may lead to hearing loss in many testicular cancer survivors

Cisplatin-based chemotherapy may lead to hearing loss in many testicular cancer survivors

Many testicular cancer survivors experience hearing loss after cisplatin-based chemotherapy, according to researchers at Indiana University. [More]
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