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Researchers reconstruct ancient virus to improve gene therapy

Researchers reconstruct ancient virus to improve gene therapy

Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Schepens Eye Research Institute have reconstructed an ancient virus that is highly effective at delivering gene therapies to the liver, muscle, and retina. This discovery, published July 30 in Cell Reports, could potentially be used to design gene therapies that are not only safer and more potent than therapies currently available, but may also help a greater number of patients. [More]
New study reports creation of genetic porcine model of cancer

New study reports creation of genetic porcine model of cancer

With many types of cancers, early detection offers the best hope for survival. However, research into new early-detection screenings, as well as possible interventional radiology and surgical treatments, has been hindered by the lack of a large animal model that would accurately reflect the types of cancers seen in human cells. [More]
Study shows how genetic changes lead to differences in form and function of species

Study shows how genetic changes lead to differences in form and function of species

Ten thousand years ago, a golden grain got naked, brought people together and grew to become one of the top agricultural commodities on the planet. [More]
Researchers uncover groundbreaking evidence for developing vaccine to prevent middle ear infections

Researchers uncover groundbreaking evidence for developing vaccine to prevent middle ear infections

Researchers from Griffith University's Institute for Glycomics, together with the Nationwide Children's Hospital in Ohio, have uncovered groundbreaking evidence to help vaccine developers prevent middle ear infections. [More]
Facial motion capture technology can help identify different speech disorders in children

Facial motion capture technology can help identify different speech disorders in children

Facial motion capture - the same technology used to develop realistic computer graphics in video games and movies - has been used to identify differences between children with childhood apraxia of speech and those with other types of speech disorders, finds a new study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. [More]
People with common form of hearing loss may benefit from hybrid cochlear implant devices

People with common form of hearing loss may benefit from hybrid cochlear implant devices

People with a common form of hearing loss not helped by hearing aids achieved significant and sometimes profound improvements in their hearing and understanding of speech with hybrid cochlear implant devices, according to a new multicenter study led by specialists at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]

Simple procedure with nasal balloon can reduce impact of hearing loss in children

For children with a common middle-ear problem, a simple procedure with a nasal balloon can reduce the impact of hearing loss and avoid unnecessary and ineffective use of antibiotics, according to a new study led by researchers from the University of Southampton. [More]
Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Is it possible that too much iron in infant formula may potentially increase risk for neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's in adulthood -- and are teeth the window into the past that can help us tell? T [More]
Vital molecular mechanism in plants has similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans

Vital molecular mechanism in plants has similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans

Scientists at Van Andel Research Institute have revealed an important molecular mechanism in plants that has significant similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans, which are closely linked to early embryonic development and to diseases such as cancer. [More]
Vanderbilt researchers hope to give new dexterity to needlescopic surgery with tiny mechanical wrist

Vanderbilt researchers hope to give new dexterity to needlescopic surgery with tiny mechanical wrist

With the flick of a tiny mechanical wrist, a team of engineers and doctors at Vanderbilt University's Medical Engineering and Discovery Laboratory hope to give needlescopic surgery a whole new degree of dexterity. [More]
UCLA Health's hospitals named among nation's best in U.S. News and World Report

UCLA Health's hospitals named among nation's best in U.S. News and World Report

UCLA Health's hospitals in Westwood and Santa Monica have been named to U.S. News and World Report's 2015-2016 Best Hospitals Honor Roll. UCLA, which previously ranked No. 5 in the country, tied for No. 3 this year. [More]
UC San Diego Health ranked again among nation's best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report

UC San Diego Health ranked again among nation's best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report

Once again, UC San Diego Health and its hospitals are ranked #1 in San Diego, and recognized among the best in the nation, by U.S. News & World Report for 2015-16. The annual U.S. News "Best Hospitals" rankings distinguish hospitals that excel in treating the most challenging health conditions. [More]
MD Anderson ranked No. 1 hospital in nation for cancer care

MD Anderson ranked No. 1 hospital in nation for cancer care

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has been ranked the No. 1 hospital for cancer care in the nation by U.S. News & World Report's "Best Hospitals" survey. [More]

New study contributes to understanding of inner ear development

Unlike birds and amphibians, mammals can't recover lost hearing. In people, the cells of the inner ear responsible for detecting sound and transmitting those signals to the brain form during early stages of development and can't be replaced if lost due to illness, injury or aging. [More]
Neuroscientists interpret code the brain uses to make noisy neuronal circuits

Neuroscientists interpret code the brain uses to make noisy neuronal circuits

By analyzing the signals of individual neurons in animals undergoing behavioral tests, neuroscientists at Rice University, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of Geneva and the University of Rochester have deciphered the code the brain uses to make the most of its inherently "noisy" neuronal circuits. [More]
Transcranial magnetic stimulation holds promise for tinnitus patients

Transcranial magnetic stimulation holds promise for tinnitus patients

In the largest U.S. clinical trial of its kind funded by the Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, researchers at the VA Portland Medical Center and Oregon Health & Science University found that transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly improved tinnitus symptoms for more than half of study participants. [More]

New incoming nerve cell connections could be contributing to age-related hearing loss, say Johns Hopkins scientists

Conventional wisdom has long blamed age-related hearing loss almost entirely on the death of sensory hair cells in the inner ear, but research from neuroscientists at Johns Hopkins has provided new information about the workings of nerve cells that suggests otherwise. [More]
Turtle Beach, Audiology Management Group partner for HyperSound Clear hearing solutions product

Turtle Beach, Audiology Management Group partner for HyperSound Clear hearing solutions product

Turtle Beach Corporation, the leading-edge audio technology company, today announced a new partnership with Audiology Management Group, Inc. for HyperSound Clear, the Company's groundbreaking hearing healthcare product planned to launch later this year. [More]

Scientists develop communication system for people with cerebral palsy

Scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation, the research company Starlab and the group BR::AC (Barcelona Research Art & Creation) of the University of Barcelona developed a device that produces sounds from brain signals. [More]
High-frequency tympanometry testing can help identify middle-ear problems in newborn babies

High-frequency tympanometry testing can help identify middle-ear problems in newborn babies

Screening newborn babies who are in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) using a testing process called high-frequency tympanometry can help identify middle-ear problems earlier, according to newly published research from a local team of researchers. [More]
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