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Scientists make breakthrough in developing new treatment for advanced bladder cancer

Scientists make breakthrough in developing new treatment for advanced bladder cancer

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have made a breakthrough in developing a new therapy for advanced bladder cancer - for which there have been no major treatment advances in the past 30 years. [More]
Genom Austria project to explore impact of genome sequencing on science and society

Genom Austria project to explore impact of genome sequencing on science and society

In many countries, genome sequencing technology is now starting to become available in the clinic, where it helps to diagnose rare Mendelian diseases and contributes to personalized cancer therapy. The analysis of personal genomes also creates unprecedented opportunities for predictive health counseling, ancestry research, and many more applications that are just starting to emerge. [More]
Biologist Marnie Halpern selected as AAAS Fellow

Biologist Marnie Halpern selected as AAAS Fellow

Biologist Marnie Halpern of Carnegie's Department of Embryology has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for her "fundamental contributions to developmental biology, particularly using novel genetic approaches to study patterning of the nervous system." [More]

Full-day preschool program associated with greater school readiness, achievement

Children who attended a full-day preschool program had higher scores on measures of school readiness skills (language, math, socio-emotional development, and physical health), increased attendance, and reduced chronic absences compared to children who attended part-day preschool, according to a study in the November 26 issue of JAMA. [More]
Research findings could lead to better tests for predicting breast cancer spread

Research findings could lead to better tests for predicting breast cancer spread

A study combining tumor cells from patients with breast cancer with a laboratory model of blood vessel lining provides the most compelling evidence so far that a specific trio of cells is required for the spread of breast cancer. The findings could lead to better tests for predicting whether a woman's breast cancer will spread and to new anti-cancer therapies. [More]
SNTF protein can predict severity of post-concussion symptoms in professional athletes

SNTF protein can predict severity of post-concussion symptoms in professional athletes

New Penn Medicine research has found that elevated levels in the blood of the brain-enriched protein calpain-cleaved ╬▒II-spectrin N-terminal fragment, known as SNTF, shortly after sports-related concussion can predict the severity of post-concussion symptoms in professional athletes. [More]
Decrease in prevalence of VRSA infections in southeastern Michigan

Decrease in prevalence of VRSA infections in southeastern Michigan

A new study finds a decrease in an emergent strain of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) that is resistant to last line defense antibiotics. Researchers examined the prevalence of vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) infections in southeastern Michigan, where the majority of these infections have occurred in the U.S. [More]
Study: Using wash cloths treated with skin cleanser could reduce skin infections in U.S. jails

Study: Using wash cloths treated with skin cleanser could reduce skin infections in U.S. jails

New research shows providing detainees wash cloths treated with a skin cleanser could reduce the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteria in U.S. jails. Researchers looked at the effect on transmission of S. aureus of using wash cloths treated with chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) compared with wash cloths with only plain water in detainees at Dallas County Jail. [More]
New Drexel study sheds light on the role of socioeconomic environment on diabetes risk

New Drexel study sheds light on the role of socioeconomic environment on diabetes risk

As the linked epidemics of obesity and diabetes continue to escalate, a staggering one in five U.S. adults is projected to have diabetes by 2050. [More]
Lewy body dementia: 10 things people need to know

Lewy body dementia: 10 things people need to know

The recent news that the brain of actor/comedian Robin Williams showed signs of diffuse Lewy body disease has created more interest and coverage in this widely under-diagnosed condition than ever before. [More]

Four Pennsylvania businesses named recipients of 2014 Capital BlueCross Worksite Wellness Award

Capital BlueCross will recognize four Pennsylvania businesses with awards for excellence in worksite wellness during a ceremony on Dec. 9 from 9-11 a.m. at the Country Club of Harrisburg. [More]
Two researchers receive Naomi Berrie Award for Outstanding Research in Diabetes

Two researchers receive Naomi Berrie Award for Outstanding Research in Diabetes

Columbia University Medical Center has presented Andrew Hattersley, DM, and Mark McCarthy, MD, with the 16th Naomi Berrie Award for Outstanding Research in Diabetes, for their work on the genetics of the disease. Their research has contributed to the discovery of new forms of the disease, improvements in diagnostic methodology, and the development of more effective treatments. [More]
University of Chicago obtains GFFS certification from Gluten Intolerance Group

University of Chicago obtains GFFS certification from Gluten Intolerance Group

The University of Chicago has received certification from the Gluten Intolerance Group's Gluten-Free Food Service (GFFS) Accreditation Program for its medical center and campus food service operations. The designation makes UChicago one of three medical centers in the United States to carry the accreditation, and the only academic institution to do so for both its hospital and campus facilities. [More]
Six Albert Einstein College of Medicine faculty members selected as AAAS Fellows

Six Albert Einstein College of Medicine faculty members selected as AAAS Fellows

Six faculty members at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. This year, 401 members have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. [More]
Comprehensive guide to help parents obtain quality medical care for children with ASDs

Comprehensive guide to help parents obtain quality medical care for children with ASDs

Navigating through the maze of health and medical services can be challenging for parents of children who have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). A new resource is now available for caregivers, health professionals and, especially, parents. [More]
Study: Shared medical appointments benefit women undergoing evaluation for macromastia

Study: Shared medical appointments benefit women undergoing evaluation for macromastia

For women considering breast reduction surgery, initial evaluation at a shared medical appointment (SMA) provides excellent patient satisfaction in a more efficient clinic visit, reports a study in the December issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
Marlo Thomas honored with Presidential Medal of Freedom

Marlo Thomas honored with Presidential Medal of Freedom

Today, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital® National Outreach Director, Marlo Thomas, was presented with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, during a special ceremony at the White House. [More]
Plaque buildup in the arteries associated with mild cognitive impairment

Plaque buildup in the arteries associated with mild cognitive impairment

In a study of nearly 2,000 adults, researchers found that a buildup of plaque in the body's major arteries was associated with mild cognitive impairment. Results of the study conducted at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center will be presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
New device may reduce discomfort of breast compression in mammography

New device may reduce discomfort of breast compression in mammography

Researchers have developed a new device that may result in more comfortable mammography for women. According to a study being presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, standardizing the pressure applied in mammography would reduce pain associated with breast compression without sacrificing image quality. [More]
Provider-centered multi-component PI CME intervention improves HPV vaccination rates

Provider-centered multi-component PI CME intervention improves HPV vaccination rates

Changing the way doctors practice medicine is difficult, however a new study has shown that combining traditional education with quality improvement and incentives improves Human Papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination rates in boys and girls. The study, which appears on-line in the journal Vaccine, has the potential to produce sustained improvements in these vaccination rates. [More]