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Getting a flu vaccination helps moms help their babies

Getting a flu vaccination helps moms help their babies

Only about half of all pregnant women in the U.S. get a flu shot each season, leaving thousands of moms-to-be and their babies at increased risk of serious illness. [More]
New finding could accelerate research to regenerate damaged tissue

New finding could accelerate research to regenerate damaged tissue

Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center have found a way to boost dramatically the efficiency of the process for turning adult cells into so-called pluripotent stem cells by combining three well-known compounds, including vitamin C. [More]
Socially disadvantaged women experience poor maternal care in the UK

Socially disadvantaged women experience poor maternal care in the UK

Women from lower socioeconomic groups in the UK report a poorer experience of care during pregnancy and there needs to be a greater focus on their care, suggests a new study published today (17 September) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. [More]
Research findings provide more details about earliest stages of neurodegenerative disease

Research findings provide more details about earliest stages of neurodegenerative disease

The link between a protein typically associated with Alzheimer's disease and its impact on memory and cognition may not be as clear as once thought, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Waisman Center. [More]
Stress coping strategies may protect against bipolar disorder recurrence

Stress coping strategies may protect against bipolar disorder recurrence

Researchers have found a link between low levels of resilience to stress in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder and impulsive behaviour, which may make them vulnerable to depressive episodes. [More]
Reducing insomnia can decrease inflammation, lower risk for chronic disease in older adults

Reducing insomnia can decrease inflammation, lower risk for chronic disease in older adults

Lack of sleep can make you sick. And while everybody has the occasional restless night, for those who suffer from chronic insomnia — some 15 percent of older adults in the United States — that sleep loss can increase the risk for cardiovascular disease, hypertension, weight gain, type 2 diabetes, and even lead to an earlier death. [More]
Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine and The Wistar Institute have been awarded a prestigious $12.1 million SPORE grant from the National Cancer Institute. The five-year Specialized Programs of Research Excellence, or SPORE, grant will fund four new melanoma research projects that aim to translate fundamental laboratory discoveries into new therapeutics to treat melanoma and other skin cancers. [More]

3D Systems unveils new robotic surgery training system at ERUS exhibition

3D Systems announced today the addition of the Simbionix RobotiX Mentor™, a new robotic surgery skills and procedural training simulator, which is being shown for the first time at the ERUS exhibition in Amsterdam, The Netherlands from September 17 to 19 (booth #7). [More]

WealthEngine hosts inaugural WE Partner Summit 2014

WealthEngine, the leading provider of wealth intelligence, prospecting solutions, and marketing services for higher education, healthcare, luxury, and financial services, hosts its inaugural WE Partner Summit 2014. [More]
Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Researchers at UT-Southwestern Medical Center have found that the most common variant of the circulating protein apolipoprotein E, called apoE3, helps repair the lining of blood vessels. Individuals with another variant, called apoE4, do not get the benefit of this repair, putting them at higher risk for cardiovascular disease. [More]
UAB researchers discover novel mechanism involved in formation of memory, learning

UAB researchers discover novel mechanism involved in formation of memory, learning

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham report the discovery of a novel mechanism in the brain involved in the formation of memory and learning. In findings reported online this week in Nature, the research team describes the role of a histone subunit known as H2A.Z. [More]
Researchers show link between childhood asthma and prenatal exposure to phthalates

Researchers show link between childhood asthma and prenatal exposure to phthalates

Researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health at the Mailman School of Public Health are the first to demonstrate an association between childhood asthma and prenatal exposure to two phthalates used in a diverse array of household products. Results appear online in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. [More]
Study uncovers new genetic risk factor for deadly skin cancer

Study uncovers new genetic risk factor for deadly skin cancer

Buffers that guard against damage to the ends of chromosomes could hold the key to a better understanding of malignant melanoma - the deadliest form of skin cancer - according to new research from the University of Leeds. [More]
Reading deficits in schizophrenia contribute to underachievement

Reading deficits in schizophrenia contribute to underachievement

People with schizophrenia display severe deficits in reading ability that are not captured in current routine clinical assessments, a study by US researchers indicates. [More]
Dominica Anderson named recipient of 2014 Julie and Ben Rogers Award for Excellence in Patient Care

Dominica Anderson named recipient of 2014 Julie and Ben Rogers Award for Excellence in Patient Care

Dominica Anderson, a nursing assistant at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, is the 2014 recipient of the Julie and Ben Rogers Award for Excellence in Patient Care. [More]
UTMB researchers analyze whether monitors reflect practices used by health care providers

UTMB researchers analyze whether monitors reflect practices used by health care providers

Wearable electronic activity monitors hold great promise in helping people to reach their fitness and health goals. These increasingly sophisticated devices help the wearers improve their wellness by constantly monitoring their activities and bodily responses. This information is organized into companion computer programs and mobile apps. [More]
Current smokers at increased risk of developing SPLC

Current smokers at increased risk of developing SPLC

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) survivors who never smoked or who are former smokers at the time of diagnosis have a lower risk of developing secondary primary lung cancers (SPLC) compared to those who are current smokers, suggesting that increased tobacco exposure is associated with a higher risk of SPLC, according to research presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology's 56th Annual Meeting. [More]
High impact health interventions reduce maternal and child mortality in poor countries

High impact health interventions reduce maternal and child mortality in poor countries

New studies have uncovered the specific interventions and advances that have led to the success with these at-risk populations in the poorest countries. [More]
New UNICEF report points out that 2.8 million babies die each year during first 28 days of life

New UNICEF report points out that 2.8 million babies die each year during first 28 days of life

Child survival rates have increased dramatically since 1990, during which time the absolute number of under-five deaths has been slashed in half from 12.7 million to 6.3 million, according to a report released today by UNICEF. [More]
New study sheds light on relationship between schizophrenia and smoking stems

New study sheds light on relationship between schizophrenia and smoking stems

Schizophrenia is associated with increased rates and intensity of tobacco smoking. A growing body of research suggests that the relationship between schizophrenia and smoking stems, in part, from an effort by patients to use nicotine to self-medicate symptoms and cognitive impairment associated with the disease. [More]