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Health Ethics Trust's Compliance Program certification awarded to Diversified Service Options

Health Ethics Trust's Compliance Program certification awarded to Diversified Service Options

Diversified Service Options, Inc., (Diversified) today announced that the company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, First Coast Service Options and Novitas Solutions, have achieved the prestigious Health Ethics Trust's Compliance Program certification for their compliance program, Navigator. [More]
Participation in extracurricular activities predicts self-discipline in preteens

Participation in extracurricular activities predicts self-discipline in preteens

Regular, structured extracurricular sports seem to help kids develop the discipline they need in order to engage effectively in the classroom, according to a new study led by Linda Pagani of the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine children's hospital. [More]
UCSF workshop helps improve palliative care communication skills among critical care nurses

UCSF workshop helps improve palliative care communication skills among critical care nurses

A workshop at the University of California San Francisco helped critical care nurses improve their palliative care communication skills, according to an article in the July issue of the American Journal of Critical Care. [More]
Findings highlight benefit of vegan-eating plans for weight loss

Findings highlight benefit of vegan-eating plans for weight loss

People on a vegetarian diet, and especially those following a vegan one that includes no animal products, see better results than dieters on other weight-reducing plans. In fact, they can lose around two kilograms more on the short term, says Ru-Yi Huang of E-Da Hospital in Taiwan after reviewing the results of twelve diet trials. [More]
ASTRO announces launch of Advances in Radiation Oncology journal

ASTRO announces launch of Advances in Radiation Oncology journal

The American Society for Radiation Oncology is pleased to announce the launch of its new open-access journal, Advances in Radiation Oncology, and the selection of its Founding Editor, Robert C. Miller, MD, MBA. Advances will begin accepting manuscripts by the end of the summer with studies to be published by late 2015. [More]
Implantable microfluid system can efficiently stabilize intraocular pressure

Implantable microfluid system can efficiently stabilize intraocular pressure

Elevated or diminished eye pressure impairs our ability to see, and in the worst cases, can even lead to blindness. Until now, there has been no effective long-term treatment. In response, Fraunhofer researchers are developing an implantable microfluid system that can efficiently and durably stabilize intraocular pressure. [More]
Nanoparticles packed with chemotherapy drug and coated with chitosan target cancer stem-like cells

Nanoparticles packed with chemotherapy drug and coated with chitosan target cancer stem-like cells

Nanoparticles packed with a clinically used chemotherapy drug and coated with an oligosaccharide derived from the carapace of crustaceans might effectively target and kill cancer stem-like cells, according to a recent study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
Rice University study reveals that gays, lesbians and heterosexuals have better health than bisexuals

Rice University study reveals that gays, lesbians and heterosexuals have better health than bisexuals

Bisexual males and females report poorer health than gays, lesbians and heterosexuals, according to a new study from sociologists at Rice University. [More]
Study offers potential ways to preserve muscle mass and strength for people in low-resistance environments

Study offers potential ways to preserve muscle mass and strength for people in low-resistance environments

It is well known that muscles need resistance (gravity) to maintain optimal health, and when they do not have this resistance, they deteriorate. A new report published in the July 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal, however, suggests that this might not be true for all muscles, offering hope that there may be ways to preserve muscle mass and strength for individuals in low-resistance environments, whether it be the microgravity of space, extended periods in a hospital bed, or a 9-5 job behind a desk. [More]
Scientists identify new protein that affects growth of secondary breast tumours in the brain

Scientists identify new protein that affects growth of secondary breast tumours in the brain

Scientists from the University of Leeds and The Institute of Cancer Research, London, have discovered a new protein which triggers the growth of blood vessels in breast cancer tumours which have spread to the brain, a common location which breast cancer can spread to. [More]
Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Cardiac arrest strikes almost 600,000 people each year, killing the vast majority of those individuals, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. Every year in the U.S., approximately 395,000 cases of cardiac arrest occur outside of a hospital setting, in which less than 6 percent survive. Approximately 200,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in hospitals, and 24 percent of those patients survive. Estimates suggest that cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind cancer and heart disease. [More]
Kansas State University nutritionist concerned about lack of summer food service programs in Kansas

Kansas State University nutritionist concerned about lack of summer food service programs in Kansas

A federal program that helps feed hungry children in the summer is not being used as well as it should be in Kansas — and that concerns a Kansas State University nutritionist. [More]
ASHG declares 2015 recipients of annual Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education

ASHG declares 2015 recipients of annual Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education

The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) has named Robert L. Nussbaum, M.D., chief medical officer of invitae and clinical professor of medicine (volunteer) at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF); Roderick R. McInnes, CM, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital and Alva chair in human genetics, Canada Research chair in neurogenetics, and professor of human genetics and biochemistry at McGill University; and Huntington F. Willard, Ph.D., president and director of the Marine Biological Laboratory and professor of human genetics at the University of Chicago; as the 2015 recipients of its annual Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education. [More]
Multiple courses of antibiotics may have significant impact on child development

Multiple courses of antibiotics may have significant impact on child development

A new animal study by NYU Langone Medical Center researchers adds to growing evidence that multiple courses of commonly used antibiotics may have a significant impact on children's development. [More]
National trial aims to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in post-acute and long-term care facilities

National trial aims to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in post-acute and long-term care facilities

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine will be leading a $1.5 million national trial to examine methods to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in post-acute and long-term care (PA/LTC) facilities. [More]
Roswell Park, Lakeshore Cancer Center partner to improve access to cancer care for Nigerians

Roswell Park, Lakeshore Cancer Center partner to improve access to cancer care for Nigerians

America's oldest cancer center and one of the world's newest oncology centers are partnering to improve access to cancer prevention, screening and care for the people of Nigeria. Roswell Park Cancer Institute and Lakeshore Cancer Center have announced an affiliation that will see Roswell Park faculty providing clinical consultations to assist LCC oncologists, who will also have access to both training at RPCI and continuing professional education seminars they can participate in remotely. [More]
Increased years of secondary schooling reduce risk of HIV infection, shows study

Increased years of secondary schooling reduce risk of HIV infection, shows study

Longer secondary schooling substantially reduces the risk of contracting HIV, particularly for girls, according to new research from Botswana published in The Lancet Global Health journal. [More]
New IOM report calls for campaign to promote public education on CPR and AED use

New IOM report calls for campaign to promote public education on CPR and AED use

A new report released today from the Institute of Medicine calls for a campaign to promote public education and training opportunities to reduce barriers to the provision of bystander CPR and defibrillation. [More]
Ranit Mishori awarded Macy Foundation grant to educate medical trainees about health needs of refugees

Ranit Mishori awarded Macy Foundation grant to educate medical trainees about health needs of refugees

The Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation has awarded a President's Grant to Georgetown family medicine physician Ranit Mishori, MD, MHS, FAAFP, to create a comprehensive curriculum to educate health professions students, residents and clinicians about the health needs of immigrants, migrants, torture survivors, asylum seekers and refugees. [More]
Health care education researchers call for more research funding to support medical training

Health care education researchers call for more research funding to support medical training

Health care education researchers, led by Dr. Julian Archer from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, have penned a heartfelt editorial in The BMJ calling for more research funding to support the evidence base for medical training. [More]
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