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Researchers uncover key factor for promoting wound healing after corneal injuries

Researchers uncover key factor for promoting wound healing after corneal injuries

In cases of severe ocular trauma involving the cornea, wound healing occurs following intervention, but at the cost of opaque scar tissue formation and damaged vision. Recent research has shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) — which can differentiate into a variety of cells, including bone, cartilage, muscle and fat cells — are capable of returning clarity to scarred corneas; however, the mechanisms by which this happens remained a mystery — until now. [More]
Study reveals many female high school athletes do not report concussion injuries to trainers

Study reveals many female high school athletes do not report concussion injuries to trainers

Nearly half of female athletes participating in high school sports have had a diagnosed or suspected concussion—but most don't report these sports-related injuries to coaches or trainers, reports a study in the Journal of Trauma Nursing, official publication of the Society of Trauma Nurses, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Study suggests ovary removal to prevent ovarian cancer should be discontinued in premenopausal women

Study suggests ovary removal to prevent ovarian cancer should be discontinued in premenopausal women

A Mayo Clinic research team has found evidence suggesting that the controversial practice of ovary removal in premenopausal women to prevent ovarian cancer should be discontinued in women who are not at high risk of cancer. [More]
Wayne State receives NIH funding to address health issues of HIV-positive and at-risk youth

Wayne State receives NIH funding to address health issues of HIV-positive and at-risk youth

A team of researchers led by Wayne State University has been awarded funding as a part of the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions, a research network devoted to the health and well-being of adolescents and young adults with HIV or at risk for HIV infection. [More]
Additional antibiotic reduces infection rates by 50% for women who have cesarean delivery

Additional antibiotic reduces infection rates by 50% for women who have cesarean delivery

Physicians at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and colleagues have discovered that administering the antibiotic azithromycin alongside the standard recommended antibiotic regimen, cefazolin, reduces infection rates by 50 percent for women who have a non-elective cesarean delivery. [More]
Imran Noorani receives Brainlab Community Neurosurgery Abstract Award at 2016 CNS annual meeting

Imran Noorani receives Brainlab Community Neurosurgery Abstract Award at 2016 CNS annual meeting

Imran Noorani MD, MRCS, of Cambridge, England, received the Brainlab Community Neurosurgery Abstract Award at the Congress of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting in San Diego. [More]
Gene therapy for LPLD patients linked to lower frequency and severity of pancreatitis

Gene therapy for LPLD patients linked to lower frequency and severity of pancreatitis

Up to 6 years after receiving a single treatment with the gene therapy product lipoprotein lipase (LPL), patients with the debilitating genetic disease LPL deficiency (LPLD) had about 50% fewer episodes of pancreatitis than before receiving the treatment. [More]
Penn researchers search twitter for tweets about cardiovascular disease

Penn researchers search twitter for tweets about cardiovascular disease

For years, marketers and other commercial data-miners have been using Twitter's vast database of "tweets" to gauge consumer attitudes and track events. Now medical researchers are getting in on the trend. [More]
Trifocal lenses: the best chance of true spectacle independence?

Trifocal lenses: the best chance of true spectacle independence?

Trifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) represent the latest in premium lens technology. They are tiny, artificial lenses that are implanted into the eye during a cataract or lens replacement procedure. [More]
Researchers aim to discover new treatments for triple-negative breast cancer

Researchers aim to discover new treatments for triple-negative breast cancer

The precision medicine approach involving DNA sequencing to pinpoint specific alterations that can be targeted with anti-cancer therapies is becoming an alternate treatment avenue for those with poor-responding cancers. [More]
Setting and achieving income, career goals may improve overall health of Native Americans

Setting and achieving income, career goals may improve overall health of Native Americans

Setting and achieving goals related to income and education may improve the overall health of Native Americans. [More]
BREXIT vote threatens to disrupt advances in gene and cell therapies in the UK

BREXIT vote threatens to disrupt advances in gene and cell therapies in the UK

The recent BREXIT vote in the UK threatens to disrupt scientific progress and clinical advances in the development of innovative gene and cell therapies. [More]
Experimental PET tracer can diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration in living person

Experimental PET tracer can diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration in living person

An experimental positron emission tomography (PET) tracer can effectively diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration while a person is still alive, according to a proof-of-concept study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published September 27 in the journal Translational Psychiatry. [More]
Dental fillings contribute to prolonged mercury levels in the body, research shows

Dental fillings contribute to prolonged mercury levels in the body, research shows

Dental surface restorations composed of dental amalgam, a mixture of mercury, silver, tin and other metals, significantly contribute to prolonged mercury levels in the body, according to new research from the University of Georgia's department of environmental health science in the College of Public Health. [More]
New study looks at better ways to treat obesity in rural areas

New study looks at better ways to treat obesity in rural areas

Currently, excess body weight contributes to as many as 1 in 5 cancer-related deaths. Obesity is associated with increased risk of at least eight types of cancer. [More]
Cryoablation appears to be viable option for early stage breast cancer treatment

Cryoablation appears to be viable option for early stage breast cancer treatment

A deep-freezing technique known as cryoablation is a viable alternative to traditional surgery in many early-stage breast cancers, NewYork-Presbyterian and Weill Cornell Medicine researchers find in a new clinical study. The results are published in the Annals of Surgical Oncology. [More]
Psychological support may be crucial for physical recovery of breast cancer patients

Psychological support may be crucial for physical recovery of breast cancer patients

The words no one wants to hear: "You have breast cancer." Unfortunately, close to 300,000 American women are expected to receive that diagnosis each year. [More]
Reasons why many older people do not consume enough protein explored by researchers

Reasons why many older people do not consume enough protein explored by researchers

Researchers from Bournemouth University have been exploring the reasons why many older people aren't eating as much protein as they should be. Findings from the study could go on to inform strategies to improve protein consumption. [More]
Researchers identify process in the brains of mice that may explain repetitive actions in Rett patients

Researchers identify process in the brains of mice that may explain repetitive actions in Rett patients

Three-year-old Naomi slaps her forehead a few times, bites her fingers and toddles across the doctor's office in her white and pink pajamas before turning her head into a door with a dull thud. [More]
Intermediate risk prostate cancer patients can achieve survival benefit with brachytherapy alone

Intermediate risk prostate cancer patients can achieve survival benefit with brachytherapy alone

For men with intermediate risk prostate cancer, radiation treatment with brachytherapy alone can result in similar cancer control with fewer long-term side effects, when compared to more aggressive treatment that combines brachytherapy with external beam therapy (EBT), according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
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