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CSL Behring awarded NHF's 2015 Corporate Leadership Award

CSL Behring awarded NHF's 2015 Corporate Leadership Award

The National Hemophilia Foundation has awarded CSL Behring its 2015 Corporate Leadership Award as recognition for the company's longstanding and unwavering commitment to advancing science and improving the care of the bleeding disorders community. The award was accepted by Paul Perreault, CEO and Managing Director, CSL Limited, during the NHF Annual Spring Soiree in New York City on May 21. [More]
New nationwide survey shows steady increase in pediatric patients treated with proton radiation therapy

New nationwide survey shows steady increase in pediatric patients treated with proton radiation therapy

Results from a new nationwide survey announced today indicate a steady increase in the number of pediatric patients who are being treated with proton radiation therapy for cancerous and non-cancerous tumors. [More]
Esophageal cancer patients treated with proton therapy experience less toxic side effects

Esophageal cancer patients treated with proton therapy experience less toxic side effects

New research by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found that esophageal cancer patients treated with proton therapy experienced significantly less toxic side effects than patients treated with older radiation therapies. [More]
Depression increases risk of mortality in patients with heart failure

Depression increases risk of mortality in patients with heart failure

Moderate to severe depression is associated with a 5-fold increased risk of all cause mortality in patients with heart failure, according to research presented today at Heart Failure 2015. The results from OPERA-HF show that risk was independent of comorbidities and severity of heart failure. Patients who were not depressed had an 80% lower mortality risk. [More]
UH pharmacy students receive awards for excellence in clinical skills, disease management

UH pharmacy students receive awards for excellence in clinical skills, disease management

University of Houston pharmacy students wrapped up the spring semester with awards for excellence in professional service, clinical skills and disease management, earning kudos at the state level from the Texas Society of Health-System Pharmacists. [More]
Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Exposure to fine particulate air pollution during pregnancy through the first two years of a child's life may be associated with an increased risk of the child developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a condition that affects one in 68 children, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health investigation of children in southwestern Pennsylvania. [More]
Goethe University researchers find endocrine disrupting chemicals in plastic baby teethers

Goethe University researchers find endocrine disrupting chemicals in plastic baby teethers

In laboratory tests, two out of ten teethers, plastic toys used to sooth babies' teething ache, release endocrine disrupting chemicals. One product contains parabens, which are normally used as preservatives in cosmetics, while the second contains six so-far unidentified endocrine disruptors. [More]
Studies refine amyloid imaging role in dementia

Studies refine amyloid imaging role in dementia

Two meta-analyses published in JAMA help to define the role of amyloid imaging in dementia. [More]
Certain proteins may slow cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer's disease

Certain proteins may slow cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer's disease

Certain proteins may slow the devastating memory loss caused by Alzheimer's disease, according to a groundbreaking Iowa State University study. [More]
Mayo Clinic hospitals earn top-tier High Performing distinction in U.S. News & World Report ratings

Mayo Clinic hospitals earn top-tier High Performing distinction in U.S. News & World Report ratings

Mayo Clinic Hospitals in Rochester, Minn, and Phoenix earned the top-tier High Performing distinction in all five common care categories in the latest ratings by U.S. News & World Report. [More]
Personalized music playlists increase adherence to cardiac rehab by 70%

Personalized music playlists increase adherence to cardiac rehab by 70%

The use of personalized music playlists with tempo-pace synchronization increases adherence to cardiac rehab by almost 70 per cent--according to a study published in Sports Medicine -Open. [More]
Clinicians play key role in making consumers aware of the threats of foodborne diseases

Clinicians play key role in making consumers aware of the threats of foodborne diseases

Food safety awareness is key to understanding the food safety issues on the horizon, and clinicians at hospitals and doctors' offices play a key role in ensuring consumers are aware of the threats of foodborne illness, said the University of Georgia's Michael Doyle. [More]
CSGI joins with two California hospitals to eradicate deadly Clostridium difficile infections

CSGI joins with two California hospitals to eradicate deadly Clostridium difficile infections

Clean Sweep Group Inc., a Beverly Hills, CA, based microbial disinfection service company, joins with two California hospitals to significantly reduce deadly Clostridium difficile infections caught in their hospitals using ultraviolet (UV-C) germ-killing advanced disinfection devices. [More]
New research project aims to improve music listening experiences in people with hearing impairments

New research project aims to improve music listening experiences in people with hearing impairments

Beethoven composed some of his most famous works after he became profoundly deaf. More recently, musicians such as Ozzy Osbourne, Brian Wilson and Phil Collins have encountered problems with their hearing. Tinnitus affects many more, from Eric Clapton and Neil Young to will.i.am. [More]
Scripps Proton Therapy Center reports exceptional results in treating patients with pencil-beam scanning

Scripps Proton Therapy Center reports exceptional results in treating patients with pencil-beam scanning

The nation's first and only proton therapy center to treat patients exclusively with pencil-beam scanning is reporting exceptional results in delivering cancer treatment since opening for patient care just more than a year ago. [More]
Twitter 'big data' could provide important details about health, social needs of transgender people

Twitter 'big data' could provide important details about health, social needs of transgender people

Transgender and gender nonconforming people are at high risk for diseases such as AIDS and are vulnerable to depression and other mental health issues, but may be reluctant to disclose their identities to researchers due to stigma. As a result, very little is known about their health and social needs. [More]
Research may offer new targets for diagnosing, treating advanced prostate cancer

Research may offer new targets for diagnosing, treating advanced prostate cancer

Researchers with the Indiana University School of Medicine have identified a molecule that promotes metastasis of advanced prostate cancer to the bone, an incurable condition that significantly decreases quality of life. [More]
Researchers use American College of Cardiology registry to improve cardiovascular care delivery in India

Researchers use American College of Cardiology registry to improve cardiovascular care delivery in India

Despite challenges, it is feasible to collect and study the quality of outpatient cardiovascular care in a resource-limited environment like India, according to a pilot study published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association. [More]

In-house training solutions from PTI: save time and cost in upskilling staff

With course topics that include, but aren’t limited to, business strategy, clinical trials, manufacturing, R&D and regulatory affairs, PTI covers all aspects of the drug and device development lifecycle... [More]
Large urban health systems do worse on government patient satisfaction scores

Large urban health systems do worse on government patient satisfaction scores

The largest urban health systems, which serve as safety nets for large patient populations with lower socioeconomic status and greater likelihood to speak English as a second language, do worse on government patient satisfaction scores than smaller, non-urban hospitals likely to serve white customers with higher education levels, according to a new study by Mount Sinai researchers published this month in the Journal of Hospital Medicine. [More]
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