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Study of twins shows that genetic variant provides greater resistance to effects of sleep deprivation

Study of twins shows that genetic variant provides greater resistance to effects of sleep deprivation

Researchers who studied 100 twin pairs have identified a gene mutation that may allow the carrier to function normally on less than six hours of sleep per night. The genetic variant also appears to provide greater resistance to the effects of sleep deprivation. [More]
Study reveals new information about body clock's sway over metabolism

Study reveals new information about body clock's sway over metabolism

Much of the liver's metabolic function is governed by circadian rhythms - our own body clock - and UC Irvine researchers have now found two independent mechanisms by which this occurs. [More]
New supplement covers current knowledge and methods for management of AAICH

New supplement covers current knowledge and methods for management of AAICH

The Journal of Neurosurgery is pleased to announce today's publication of a supplement to the August issue entitled "Race Against the Clock: Overcoming Challenges in the Management of Anticoagulant-Associated Intracerebral Hemorrhage. [More]
New algorithm eliminates exposure to radiation when diagnosing children with acute appendicitis

New algorithm eliminates exposure to radiation when diagnosing children with acute appendicitis

Implementation of an algorithm aimed to diagnose pediatric patients with suspected appendicitis reduces the utilization of computed tomography (CT) scans, without affecting diagnostic accuracy, Mayo Clinic Children's Center researchers have found. The study was recently published in the journal Surgery. [More]
Adoption of hourly rounds schedules for nurses may improve patient safety and satisfaction

Adoption of hourly rounds schedules for nurses may improve patient safety and satisfaction

Adoption of hourly rounds schedules for nurses working in acute care hospitals may improve patient safety and overall satisfaction with care provided, according to research reported in the Journal for Healthcare Quality, the peer reviewed publication of the National Association for Healthcare Quality. [More]
Southern-style diet results in higher risk of death in patients with chronic kidney disease

Southern-style diet results in higher risk of death in patients with chronic kidney disease

New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases shows consuming a "Southern-style" diet — consisting of processed meats, fried foods and sugar-sweetened beverages — results in higher risk of death in those with chronic kidney disease. [More]
Medical education in sub-Saharan Africa is being revitalized through U.S. funded effort

Medical education in sub-Saharan Africa is being revitalized through U.S. funded effort

Medical education in sub-Saharan Africa is being revitalized and expanded through a U.S.-funded effort that is dramatically increasing enrollment, broadening curricula, upgrading Internet access and providing cutting-edge skills labs and other technologies. [More]
Viewpoints: GOP lawsuit against Obama on health law is not a 'stunt'; 'wisdom' lacking in the House; the danger of cyberattacks on hospitals

Viewpoints: GOP lawsuit against Obama on health law is not a 'stunt'; 'wisdom' lacking in the House; the danger of cyberattacks on hospitals

"So sue me" is President Obama's message to Congress. And on Wednesday the House of Representatives took up his taunt, authorizing a lawsuit to challenge the president's failure to faithfully execute provisions of the Affordable Care Act as passed by Congress. The House lawsuit is no "stunt," as Mr. Obama has characterized it. [More]
Researchers one step closer to finding treatment for dengue fever

Researchers one step closer to finding treatment for dengue fever

There have been several news reports that the world's first dengue vaccine will be available next year. However, the latest clinical trials show that the vaccine only provides a protection of around 50 per cent for DENV-2 and DENV-1, which are commonly found in Singapore. [More]
Researchers suggest few immediate and long-term methods for soothing frayed nerves

Researchers suggest few immediate and long-term methods for soothing frayed nerves

There's sad news in the study of happiness. Rest assured, there is a happy ending, though. University of Cincinnati research on perceived happiness shows that many college students are stressed out and aren't coping. [More]
New guidelines help allergist steer patient out of yellow zone and back into green

New guidelines help allergist steer patient out of yellow zone and back into green

If you have asthma, you may have an asthma action plan with a "stoplight system" to help you recognize and respond to changes and understand when symptoms are getting worse and need more attention. [More]
Researchers identify possible new drug target for treating childhood blood cancer

Researchers identify possible new drug target for treating childhood blood cancer

In what is believed to be the largest genetic analysis of what triggers and propels progression of tumor growth in a common childhood blood cancer, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center report that they have identified a possible new drug target for treating the disease. [More]
Returning National Guardsmen more likely to turn to alcohol when faced with issues at home

Returning National Guardsmen more likely to turn to alcohol when faced with issues at home

Regardless of traumatic events experienced during deployment, returning National Guard soldiers were more likely to develop a drinking problem if faced with civilian life setbacks, including job loss, legal problems, divorce, and serious financial and legal problems-all commonplace in military families. [More]
Tips from ACAAI to help kids enjoy healthy, symptom-free days in classroom

Tips from ACAAI to help kids enjoy healthy, symptom-free days in classroom

Your kids may be enjoying the lazy days of summer, but if they have asthma, allergies, or both, they need to be prepared for back-to-school. And so do their classrooms. More than 10 million kids under age 18 have asthma, and 11 percent suffer from respiratory allergies. About 6 percent have also been diagnosed with food allergies. [More]
Tree nuts have positive impact on glycemic control in diabetes and on metabolic syndrome criteria

Tree nuts have positive impact on glycemic control in diabetes and on metabolic syndrome criteria

Two new meta-analyses involving tree nuts (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts) were recently published in the online publications, British Medical Journal Open (BMJ Open) and PLOS ONE. [More]

IOM report calling medical education reform could set up major battle over funding

The report, which says the $15 billion spent annually to train doctors is failing, could lead to congressional battles and rivalries among doctors' groups. [More]
OAC, YMCA of Central Florida partner to educate public about obesity, health and wellness

OAC, YMCA of Central Florida partner to educate public about obesity, health and wellness

Today, the Obesity Action Coalition and the YMCA of Central Florida are proud to announce an exciting new partnership aimed at educating the public about obesity, health and wellness and much more. With synergistic missions focused on overall health, the partnership is a proactive step forward to help the more than 93 million Americans impacted by the disease of obesity. [More]

Genae establishes offices in London to provide high quality research services on global scale

genae, a global Contract Research Organization (CRO) and services provider for the medical industries, announced today the incorporation of genae UK in London. [More]
Johns Hopkins School of Nursing to launch new HIV curriculum for non-physician providers

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing to launch new HIV curriculum for non-physician providers

The 31-year-old Moore Clinic operated by the Johns Hopkins AIDS Service at the School of Medicine is a historic operation — the second-oldest AIDS clinic in the country. But when Jason Farley, PhD, MPH, CRNP, looks nowadays at the makeup of Moore's caregiving staff, he worries that he's seeing too much history. [More]
Consumer education campaign can help explain eventual changes to food labels

Consumer education campaign can help explain eventual changes to food labels

To help Americans make better decisions about what they eat, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) earlier this year proposed significant changes to the Nutrition Facts label found on nearly every food product in the U.S. [More]