Education News and Research RSS Feed - Education News and Research

Possible therapies to address cognitive symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia

Possible therapies to address cognitive symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia

By studying specially bred mice with specific developmental and cognitive traits resembling those seen in schizophrenia, UC San Francisco researchers have provided new evidence that abnormal rhythmic activity in particular brain cells contributes to problems with learning, attention, and decision-making in individuals with that disorder. [More]
Better interventions possible for children experiencing acute psychosis with antibodies

Better interventions possible for children experiencing acute psychosis with antibodies

Antibodies defend the body against bacterial, viral, and other invaders. But sometimes the body makes antibodies that attack healthy cells. In these cases, autoimmune disorders develop. [More]
Bob Foster named recipient of HCP's 2015 Hospital IT Executive of the Year Award

Bob Foster named recipient of HCP's 2015 Hospital IT Executive of the Year Award

Health Connect Partners, Inc., a healthcare education firm, announced today that Bob Foster is the recipient of the company's 2015 Hospital IT Executive of the Year Award. [More]
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, UMHS announce new initiative to enhance genetic testing practices

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, UMHS announce new initiative to enhance genetic testing practices

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and the University of Michigan Health System are collaborating with physicians and laboratories across the state as part of a new initiative to improve genetic testing practices. [More]
LUNGevity applauds FDA's approval of Opdivo drug

LUNGevity applauds FDA's approval of Opdivo drug

LUNGevity Foundation, the nation's leading lung cancer nonprofit, applauds the Food and Drug Administration's approval of Bristol Myers Squibb's new immunotherapy drug Opdivo (nivolumab). Opdivo and other immunotherapy treatments add another critical new treatment option to fight lung cancer by harnessing the power of a patient's own immune system to fight cancerous cells. [More]
New CDC statistics show promise in fight against dental caries

New CDC statistics show promise in fight against dental caries

Statistics released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show promise in the fight against dental caries (cavities). When compared with published data from previous surveys, the new data show an increase in the percentage of children who receive treatment when that disease does occur. [More]
Babies treated for CMV infection for six months have better developmental outcomes

Babies treated for CMV infection for six months have better developmental outcomes

Babies treated for symptomatic cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection for six months, instead of the standard six weeks, have better hearing and developmental outcomes, according to a new study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. [More]

Elsevier announces commercial launch of new medical ExamPrep tool for UK students

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, has announced the commercial launch in the UK of its new medical exam preparation and simulation tool, ExamPrep. [More]
New cell powerhouse sequencing technique may provide clearer picture of inherited disease risk

New cell powerhouse sequencing technique may provide clearer picture of inherited disease risk

A new sequencing technique may provide a clearer picture of how genes in mitochondria, the "powerhouses" that turn sugar into energy in human cells, shape each person's inherited risk for diabetes, heart disease and cancer, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online this week in the journal Nucleic Acids Research. [More]
Common flame retardants linked to obesity, say UH researchers

Common flame retardants linked to obesity, say UH researchers

Could your electronics be making you fat? According to University of Houston researchers, a common flame retardant used to keep electronics from overheating may be to blame. [More]
Study: Omega-3 fatty acids appear to protect heart function among heart attack survivors

Study: Omega-3 fatty acids appear to protect heart function among heart attack survivors

Taking omega-3 fatty acids appeared to lower inflammation and guard against further declines in heart function among recent heart attack survivors already receiving optimal standard care, according to results from a randomized, controlled trial to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session in San Diego. [More]
ILROG guideline outlines treatment options for pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma patients

ILROG guideline outlines treatment options for pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma patients

The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has issued a guideline that outlines the use of 3-D computed tomography (CT)-based radiation therapy planning and volumetric image guidance to more effectively treat pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma and to reduce the radiation dose to normal tissue, thus decreasing the risk of late side effects. [More]
Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation, Cerner partner to elevate care of individuals with addiction disorders

Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation, Cerner partner to elevate care of individuals with addiction disorders

The Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation, the nation's largest nonprofit addiction treatment solutions provider, announced today it has selected leading health IT supplier Cerner Corp. to implement a new electronic health record (EHR) system throughout its organization. [More]
Mayo Clinic, Gentag partner to develop wearable biosensors for treating obesity, diabetes

Mayo Clinic, Gentag partner to develop wearable biosensors for treating obesity, diabetes

Mayo Clinic and Gentag, Inc. have reached an agreement to develop the next generation of wearable biosensors designed to fight obesity and diabetes. [More]
New CPPP report shows that one in four Texas children lives in poverty

New CPPP report shows that one in four Texas children lives in poverty

One in four Texas children lives in poverty, threatening their potential and the state's continued prosperity. According to State of Texas Children 2015, a new Center for Public Policy Priorities (CPPP) report released today, slight improvements in health care and school nutrition don't compensate for inadequate investments in education and child protection. [More]
New guidance to prevent bisphosphonate-related atypical femoral fractures

New guidance to prevent bisphosphonate-related atypical femoral fractures

Physicians worldwide frequently prescribe bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and ibandronate (Boniva) to treat osteoporosis and prevent fragility fractures. Unfortunately, long-term bisphosphonate use has been linked to an increased risk of atypical femoral fractures. [More]
Changing breast cancer cells' shape could make the disease more sensitive to treatments

Changing breast cancer cells' shape could make the disease more sensitive to treatments

Changing the shape of breast cancer cells could make the disease more sensitive to treatments - even driving the body's own inflammatory response against a tumour - a new study shows. [More]
Environmental conditions play significant role in determining growth, height

Environmental conditions play significant role in determining growth, height

If you've ever wondered why you aren't a little taller, it turns out it's not all about genetics. In findings published in the Journal of Pediatrics (January 2015), an Israeli research team shows that the environment in which one lives from the womb to about age one largely determines an adult's height. [More]
New healthcare law may threaten federally subsidized coverage for over 2.5 million Americans

New healthcare law may threaten federally subsidized coverage for over 2.5 million Americans

A new study shows that over 2.5 million Americans who have a serious mental health condition in 34 states will become uninsured in 2016, if the Supreme Court rolls back tax credit subsidies that currently make it affordable for those individuals to purchase coverage on federally-run health insurance marketplaces under the Affordable Care Act. [More]
Sports-related concussion laws need to be extended to prevent head injuries in teenage athletes

Sports-related concussion laws need to be extended to prevent head injuries in teenage athletes

Recent concussion laws that set out to prevent head injuries in American teenage athletes should be extended to include the activities of summer camps, travel teams and all-star teams. This will ensure that all children and youths who suffer head injuries receive appropriate care and education. [More]