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NCCN commemorates 20 years of advancing high-quality, high-value cancer care

NCCN commemorates 20 years of advancing high-quality, high-value cancer care

On January 31, 2015, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network celebrates its 20th anniversary. Originally announced as an alliance of 13 leading cancer centers in 1995, NCCN has grown to a network of 25 academic cancer centers; the NCCN mission as an alliance of leading academic cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is to improve the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. [More]
Temple University Hospital participating in trial to test vibrating capsule for chronic constipation treatment

Temple University Hospital participating in trial to test vibrating capsule for chronic constipation treatment

Chronic constipation is a common problem that affects approximately 15 percent of the U.S. population, according to the American Gastroenterological Association. It can be painful and lead to a reduction in a patient's quality of life. Temple University Hospital is the only hospital in the Philadelphia region participating in a nationwide clinical trial to test an innovative, vibrating capsule for patients with chronic constipation. [More]
TAU researchers identify novel proteins capable of stymieing growth in antibiotic-resistant bacteria

TAU researchers identify novel proteins capable of stymieing growth in antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Antibiotic-resistant infections are on the rise, foiling efforts to reduce death rates in developing countries where uncontrolled use of antibiotics and poor sanitation run amok. The epidemic of "superbugs," bacteria resistant to antibiotics, knows no borders -- presenting a clear and present danger around the globe. [More]
Scientists identify strong link between beclin 1 gene and triple-negative breast cancer

Scientists identify strong link between beclin 1 gene and triple-negative breast cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have identified a strong link between the most aggressive type of breast cancer and a gene that regulates the body's natural cellular recycling process, called autophagy. [More]
Atypical features common in bipolar disorder subtypes, associated with therapy

Atypical features common in bipolar disorder subtypes, associated with therapy

Atypical features are prevalent in all subtypes of bipolar disorder, a Chinese survey published in Neuroscience Bulletin, shows, and are associated with the use of antidepressant medication in patients with mixed stage and remission subtypes. [More]
Researchers identify molecular pathways that could lead to new therapeutic targets for cerebral malaria

Researchers identify molecular pathways that could lead to new therapeutic targets for cerebral malaria

A drug already approved for treating other diseases may be useful as a treatment for cerebral malaria, according to researchers at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. They discovered a novel link between food intake during the early stages of infection and the outcome of the disease, identifying two molecular pathways that could serve as new targets for treatment. [More]
K. Hovnanian Children's Hospital introduces Meridian Dentistry for Children

K. Hovnanian Children's Hospital introduces Meridian Dentistry for Children

K. Hovnanian Children's Hospital at Jersey Shore University Medical Center introduces Meridian Dentistry for Children, a specialized, full-service, dental practice for infants, children and adolescents in a child-friendly, caring environment. [More]
UAB doctor says measles can be halted with safe, effective measles vaccine

UAB doctor says measles can be halted with safe, effective measles vaccine

An ongoing, multistate measles outbreak linked to a California amusement park has already caused 68 confirmed cases between Jan. 1 and 23, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Menopause does not exacerbate or cause sleep problems, shows study

Menopause does not exacerbate or cause sleep problems, shows study

Women in their late thirties and forties who have trouble sleeping are more than three times more likely to suffer sleep problems during menopause than women who have an easier time getting shut-eye, according to a new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Immunotherapy expert discusses the concept of precision immunology and personalized medicine

Immunotherapy expert discusses the concept of precision immunology and personalized medicine

With President Obama's recent State of the Union speech addressing the launch of a national precision medicine initiative to further tackle cancer and other diseases, a leading immunotherapy expert from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey weighs in on where we stand with precision immunology and personalized medicine and what needs to be accomplished. [More]
Support employees in Ontario vote to ratify agreement between OPSEU and Canadian Blood Services

Support employees in Ontario vote to ratify agreement between OPSEU and Canadian Blood Services

Canadian Blood Services is pleased to announce that support employees in Ontario, represented by the Ontario Public Service Employees Union (OPSEU), have voted to ratify the agreement recently reached between the two parties. [More]
Cardiologist promotes the importance of controlling high blood pressure

Cardiologist promotes the importance of controlling high blood pressure

During Heart Month, the Cardiovascular Institute of New Jersey at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School is promoting the importance of controlling high blood pressure, also called hypertension, in order to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and other related chronic disorders in adults. [More]
Certain hygiene habits linked to contamination of contact lens cases

Certain hygiene habits linked to contamination of contact lens cases

Contact lens wearers who don't follow certain hygiene habits have increased bacterial contamination of their contact lens cases, reports a study in the February issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. [More]

IOMC receives initial funding to help eliminate health disparities in Chicago's underserved communities

The Institute of Medicine of Chicago (IOMC) has announced the receipt of initial funding to pursue its new initiative designed to help eliminate health disparities in Chicago's underserved communities. [More]
Gluten-free diet important for people with celiac disease

Gluten-free diet important for people with celiac disease

You'd never suspect it from the proliferation of gluten-free items on supermarket shelves. Yet only one in approximately 133 people - that's 0.75 percent of the population - has celiac disease, a genetic autoimmune disorder that causes the body to react negatively to the intake of gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, barley and their derivatives. [More]
Most home chefs engage in risky food practices

Most home chefs engage in risky food practices

If you're gearing up for a big Super Bowl bash, you might want to consult the best food-handling practices before preparing that feast. New research from Kansas State University finds that most home chefs drop the ball on food safety. [More]
Researchers receive $2.2M grant to study links between depression and cardiovascular disease in HIV patients

Researchers receive $2.2M grant to study links between depression and cardiovascular disease in HIV patients

Jesse Stewart, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, and two colleagues have received a $2.2 million National Institutes of Health grant to investigate the links between depression, depression treatment and cardiovascular disease in adults with HIV. [More]
DePuy Synthes Spine receives 510(k) clearance to market SYNAPSE OCT System with posterior cervical screws

DePuy Synthes Spine receives 510(k) clearance to market SYNAPSE OCT System with posterior cervical screws

DePuy Synthes Spine today announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market its SYNAPSETM Occipital-Cervical-Thoracic (OCT) System with posterior cervical screws, the first time cervical screws have been indicated for use with a screw-rod posterior fixation system. [More]
Marie Csete appointed president and chief scientist of HMRI

Marie Csete appointed president and chief scientist of HMRI

Huntington Medical Research Institutes, a leading biomedical research organization, has announced the appointment of Marie Csete, MD, PhD, its chief scientific officer, to her new role as president and chief scientist of HMRI. [More]
People who carry longevity gene variant have larger brain region

People who carry longevity gene variant have larger brain region

People who carry a variant of a gene that is associated with longevity also have larger volumes in a front part of the brain involved in planning and decision-making, according to researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]