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Mayo Clinic study finds overlapping surgeries to be safe for patients

Mayo Clinic study finds overlapping surgeries to be safe for patients

A common way of scheduling surgeries to expand patient access to care and improve hospital efficiency, known as "overlapping surgeries," is as safe and provides the same outcomes for patients as non-overlapping surgeries, a Mayo Clinic study has found. [More]
Researchers assess scientific rigor in animal experimentation

Researchers assess scientific rigor in animal experimentation

The "reproducibility crisis" in biomedical research has led to questions about the scientific rigor in animal research, and thus the ethical justification of animal experiments. [More]
Surveys reveal exceptional progress against HIV in Africa

Surveys reveal exceptional progress against HIV in Africa

National surveys in Zimbabwe, Malawi, and Zambia reveal exceptional progress against HIV, with decreasing rates of new infection, stable numbers of people living with HIV, and more than half of all those living with HIV showing viral suppression through use of antiretroviral medication. For those on antiretroviral medication, viral suppression is close to 90 percent. [More]
Special article outlines recommended strategies to prevent Zika from blood transfusion

Special article outlines recommended strategies to prevent Zika from blood transfusion

As the Zika epidemic spreads to the United States, the potential for contracting the disease via blood transfusion has emerged as a serious concern. [More]
Auditory deficits in people with schizophrenia linked to dysfunctional brain receptors

Auditory deficits in people with schizophrenia linked to dysfunctional brain receptors

The inability to hear subtle changes in pitch, a common and debilitating problem for people with schizophrenia, is due to dysfunctional N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) brain receptors, according to a study by Columbia University Medical Center researchers. [More]
Customized tablet-based tool can help epilepsy patients to manage own unique symptoms

Customized tablet-based tool can help epilepsy patients to manage own unique symptoms

Epilepsy patients who want to learn how to manage their own unique symptoms can now get individualized information via tablet computer through a research project at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
NYU study finds cortisol profile differences among sexual minority men

NYU study finds cortisol profile differences among sexual minority men

Cortisol is a life sustaining adrenal hormone essential to maintaining the natural balance of the body. [More]
Latina women with breast cancer likely to experience many gaps in survivorship care, research suggests

Latina women with breast cancer likely to experience many gaps in survivorship care, research suggests

Breast cancer patients in one of the United States' largest and fastest-growing ethnic minority groups are likely to experience numerous gaps in care following their primary treatment, research from Oregon State University suggests. [More]
Older adults with cataracts more likely to have depressive symptoms, study shows

Older adults with cataracts more likely to have depressive symptoms, study shows

Older adults with cataracts are more likely to have symptoms of depression, reports a study in the December issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. [More]
Antidepressant use in early pregnancy may increase risk of congenital anomalies in babies or stillbirths

Antidepressant use in early pregnancy may increase risk of congenital anomalies in babies or stillbirths

Academics at Swansea University have carried out a dose-response analysis which suggests that pregnant women who take a specific type of antidepressant in early pregnancy have a small but significantly greater risk of having babies with major congenital anomalies (sometimes referred to as birth defects) or stillbirths compared with those who did not take these antidepressants. [More]
Philips pathology services recognised as big contributor to cancer research

Philips pathology services recognised as big contributor to cancer research

Royal Philips (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHIA) today commented on a recent report of Cancer Research UK (CRUK), which indicates that innovations, such as digital pathology, image measurement and digital collaboration are recommended to avert major gaps in UK pathology services in the near future. [More]
First basic sign language and dictionary developed for deaf and hearing impaired people in South Sudan

First basic sign language and dictionary developed for deaf and hearing impaired people in South Sudan

South Sudan's first unified basic sign language and sign language dictionary will be officially launched and presented in the capital city Juba on Thursday. [More]
Short-term sleep loss affects cardiac function

Short-term sleep loss affects cardiac function

Too little sleep takes a toll on your heart, according to a new study to be presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
Delay in giving adrenaline shots after cardiac arrest lowers survival rates of patients

Delay in giving adrenaline shots after cardiac arrest lowers survival rates of patients

Hospitals in which the administration of epinephrine to patients whose hearts have stopped is delayed beyond five minutes have significantly lower survival rates of those patients, a new study led by a cardiologist at UT Southwestern Medical Center finds. [More]
Report reveals hospitalization, mortality rates for kidney disease patients continue to decrease in the U.S.

Report reveals hospitalization, mortality rates for kidney disease patients continue to decrease in the U.S.

According to an annual data report from the United States Renal Data System, hospitalization and mortality rates for patients with chronic kidney disease continue to decline in the U.S. [More]
Menopausal women may experience accelerated decline in lung function, research shows

Menopausal women may experience accelerated decline in lung function, research shows

Menopausal women appear to experience an accelerated decline in lung function, according to new research published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Aer Lingus, Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support collaborate to develop visual guide for air travel

Aer Lingus, Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support collaborate to develop visual guide for air travel

Aer Lingus and the Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support at Saint Joseph's University have partnered to develop a visual guide that helps individuals with autism and related disorders prepare for and experience air travel. [More]
Many women dissatisfied with length of time for diagnosis of PCOS, survey finds

Many women dissatisfied with length of time for diagnosis of PCOS, survey finds

A large international survey of women with a common condition called polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), which is characterized by reproductive and metabolic problems, found nearly two in three were dissatisfied with the length of time they waited and the number of healthcare professionals they had to see before they received a diagnosis, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Scientists discover unique genomic changes integral to testicular cancer development

Scientists discover unique genomic changes integral to testicular cancer development

Researchers led by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute say they have identified unique genomic changes that may be integral to testicular cancer development and explain why the great majority are highly curable with chemotherapy - unlike most solid tumors. [More]
White deaths exceed births in 17 U.S. states, report reveals

White deaths exceed births in 17 U.S. states, report reveals

According to new research by Rogelio Sáenz, dean of The University of Texas at San Antonio College of Public Policy, and Kenneth Johnson, senior demographer at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire, more white deaths than births were reported in 17 U.S. states--more than in any time in the country's history--compared to only four in 2004. [More]
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