Embryology News and Research RSS Feed - Embryology News and Research

Embryology is the study of the development of an embryo. An embryo is defined as any organism in an early stage well before birth or hatching, or in plants, before germination occurs.
High mobility group (HMG) genes and cancer: an interview with Dr. Linda Resar, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

High mobility group (HMG) genes and cancer: an interview with Dr. Linda Resar, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

High mobility group A genes are highly expressed in all aggressive cancers studied to date. These genes encode the high mobility group A (HMGA) proteins. In other words, these genes provide the genetic “code” necessary to produce HMGA proteins. [More]
BGI, CITIC-XIANGYA successfully apply NGS to detect IVF embryos with genetic abnormalities

BGI, CITIC-XIANGYA successfully apply NGS to detect IVF embryos with genetic abnormalities

The largest genomic institute of the world, BGI Shenzhen, China, together with Reproductive & Genetic Hospital CITIC-XIANGYA announced today that they have successfully applied Next Generation Sequencing to detect in vitro fertilized embryos with genetic abnormalities. [More]
Women feel positive about egg freezing

Women feel positive about egg freezing

Egg freezing as insurance against age-related infertility is a growing trend in many countries. Women who bank oocytes for use at some time in the future hope to buy a little time in their search for a suitable partner. [More]
Children born after assisted reproduction at no greater risk for cancer, study finds

Children born after assisted reproduction at no greater risk for cancer, study finds

Children born as a result of assisted reproduction are at no greater risk of cancer than children born spontaneously in the general population, according to results of one of the largest ever cohort studies of ART children. [More]
Study shows female obesity may reduce receptivity of uterus to embryo implantation

Study shows female obesity may reduce receptivity of uterus to embryo implantation

An analysis of almost 10,000 first cycles of egg donation treatment at one of Europe's largest IVF centres shows that female obesity reduces the receptivity of the uterus to embryo implantation and thereby compromises reproductive outcome. [More]
Working shift patterns associated with increased risk of subfertility and menstrual disruption

Working shift patterns associated with increased risk of subfertility and menstrual disruption

Shift work, which encourages sleep deprivation and patterns of activity outside the circadian rhythm, has been associated with a greater risk of ill health and loss of well-being in some (but not all) studies.(1) However, little is known about the effects of shift work on reproductive health and fertility. [More]
Multiple pregnancies conceived after IVF associated with increased breast cancer risk

Multiple pregnancies conceived after IVF associated with increased breast cancer risk

Women who give birth to multiple babies following IVF treatment are at a higher risk of breast cancer than those giving birth to singletons or who remain childless. Dutch investigators from the Omega study group said the explanation may not be the multiple pregnancy per se but a maternal trait related to a higher implantation potential and to breast cancer itself. [More]
Altruism is important, but financial compensation a convincing reason for egg donation in some countries

Altruism is important, but financial compensation a convincing reason for egg donation in some countries

Egg donation is now one of the major reasons why couples travel abroad for fertility treatment. Because this growing trend may circumvent regulations at home or raise concerns about financial inducement, it has also become one of the most controversial. [More]
New low-cost method of in-vitro fertilization may help infertile couples in developing countries

New low-cost method of in-vitro fertilization may help infertile couples in developing countries

A new low-cost method of in-vitro fertilization developed at the University of Colorado Boulder that performed successfully in recent human clinical trials in Belgium may help thousands of infertile couples in developing countries. [More]
Adverse fetal growth, exposure to maternal smoking correlated with lower measures of sperm quality

Adverse fetal growth, exposure to maternal smoking correlated with lower measures of sperm quality

Studies over the past 20 years have suggested (though not unequivocally confirmed) that semen quality is in decline, reflected most evidently in falling sperm counts and reduced sperm motility. [More]
Risk of implantation failure, lower yield of oocytes linked to higher levels of urinary phthalates

Risk of implantation failure, lower yield of oocytes linked to higher levels of urinary phthalates

Phthalates are among a group of industrial chemicals shown in some studies to have adverse effects on reproductive health and development, particularly in the male. As such, they have been collectively defined as "endocrine disruptors", and proposed as one of several possible environmental exposures responsible for a decline in fertility. [More]

BCSI, ORIGIO partner to advance pH monitoring solutions for IVF

Blood Cell Storage, Inc., a leading medical device provider based in Seattle, WA and ORIGIO a/s, a leader in delivering innovative Assisted Reproductive Technology solutions headquartered in Malov Denmark, announced a partnership today during the annual meeting of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. [More]
Study on assisted reproduction published in Reproductive BioMedicine Online

Study on assisted reproduction published in Reproductive BioMedicine Online

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, today announced the publication of a recent retrospective study in Reproductive BioMedicine Online to better understand treatment considerations and outcomes for same-sex male couples and single men when using assisted reproduction treatment. [More]
Individual hydroxymethylcytosine molecules in DNA detected by new method involving chemical modification and nanopore analysis

Individual hydroxymethylcytosine molecules in DNA detected by new method involving chemical modification and nanopore analysis

Changes in the bases that make up DNA act as markers, telling a cell which genes it should read and which it shouldn’t. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a British team has now introduced a new method that makes it possible to enrich the rare gene segments that contain the modified base hydroxymethylcytosine and to identify individual hydroxymethylcytosine molecules in DNA. Such modifications are associated with autoimmune diseases and cancer. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientist awarded Ho-Am prize for discovery of myostatin

Johns Hopkins scientist awarded Ho-Am prize for discovery of myostatin

South Korea's Ho-Am Foundation announced that Johns Hopkins researcher Se-Jin Lee, M.D., Ph.D., has won this year's Ho-Am Prize in Medicine. [More]
Researchers diagnose genetic disease in embryonic DNA without biopsy

Researchers diagnose genetic disease in embryonic DNA without biopsy

Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) technologies allow identification of genetic disorders in human preimplantation embryos after in vitro fertilization (IVF) and before the embryo is transferred back to the patient. [More]
Congenital sight impairment cure grows closer

Congenital sight impairment cure grows closer

A cure for congenital sight impairment caused by lens damage is closer following research by scientists at Monash University. [More]
Miscarriage and molecular signals: an interview with Prof Brosens and Prof Quenby

Miscarriage and molecular signals: an interview with Prof Brosens and Prof Quenby

Miscarriage is defined as the spontaneous loss of pregnancy before the baby reaches viability. Besides the physical trauma, miscarriage causes considerable anxiety, stress, and depression. [More]
Many male cancer patients missing out on appropriate fertility advice

Many male cancer patients missing out on appropriate fertility advice

Pioneering research presented at the Fertility 2013 conference today shows that a large proportion of male cancer patients are missing out on appropriate fertility advice. [More]
Molecular signals make some women prone to miscarriage

Molecular signals make some women prone to miscarriage

Scientists have identified molecular signals that control whether embryos are accepted by the womb, and that appear to function abnormally in women who have suffered repeated miscarriages. [More]