Endocrinologist News and Research RSS Feed - Endocrinologist News and Research

Mayo Clinic, Gentag partner to develop wearable biosensors for treating obesity, diabetes

Mayo Clinic, Gentag partner to develop wearable biosensors for treating obesity, diabetes

Mayo Clinic and Gentag, Inc. have reached an agreement to develop the next generation of wearable biosensors designed to fight obesity and diabetes. [More]
Hormone therapy safe for transgender individuals, say BUSM researchers

Hormone therapy safe for transgender individuals, say BUSM researchers

In the most comprehensive review to date addressing the relative safety of hormone therapy for transgender persons, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine have found that hormone therapy in transgender adults is safe. The findings, which appear in the Journal of Clinical and Translational Endocrinology, may help reduce the barriers for transgender individuals to receive medical care. [More]
Researchers identify molecule that plays key role in aggressive thyroid cancer, other cancers

Researchers identify molecule that plays key role in aggressive thyroid cancer, other cancers

Cancer researchers at Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida, have identified a molecule they say is important to survival of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) — a lethal tumor with no effective therapies. [More]
Harmless plant extract can help treat Cushing Disease

Harmless plant extract can help treat Cushing Disease

Cushing Disease, not to be confused with Cushing's Syndrome, is caused by a tumour in the pituitary gland in the brain. The tumour secrets increased amounts of the stress hormone adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) followed by cortisol release from the adrenal glands leading to rapid weight gain, elevated blood pressure and muscular weakness. [More]
UVA's new program uses EpicCare electronic medical record to improve patients' access to specialists

UVA's new program uses EpicCare electronic medical record to improve patients' access to specialists

The University of Virginia Health System is piloting a new program that uses its EpicCare electronic medical record to speed patients' access to specialists. [More]
Research findings may lead to new treatment for hypothyroidism

Research findings may lead to new treatment for hypothyroidism

An international research team led by physician-scientists at Rush University Medical Center have gained new insights into hypothyroidism - a condition affecting about 10 million people in the U.S. - that may lead to new treatment protocols for the disease, particularly among the approximately 15 percent of patients for whom standard treatments are less effective. [More]
Novo Nordisk gets positive CHMP opinion for expanded use of Tresiba in children with diabetes

Novo Nordisk gets positive CHMP opinion for expanded use of Tresiba in children with diabetes

Novo Nordisk today announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has issued a positive opinion for expanded use of Tresiba® (insulin degludec) in children and adolescents aged one to 17 years with diabetes. [More]
Continued exposure to high blood sugars may impact brain function in young diabetic children

Continued exposure to high blood sugars may impact brain function in young diabetic children

Investigators have found that young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have slower brain growth compared to children without diabetes. A new study, published in the December issue of Diabetes, now available ahead of print, suggests that continued exposure to hyperglycemia, or high blood sugars, may be detrimental to the developing brain. [More]
Inadequate weight gain during pregnancy puts male fetuses at risk

Inadequate weight gain during pregnancy puts male fetuses at risk

The amount of weight a woman gains during pregnancy can be vitally important--especially if she's carrying a boy--according to a study by researchers at the University of Georgia released today in PLOS ONE, an open access peer-reviewed journal published by the Public Library of Science. [More]
Endocrinologist examines benefits and harms of testosterone therapy

Endocrinologist examines benefits and harms of testosterone therapy

An article in the latest edition of Australian Prescriber looks at the prescribing of testosterone, often used for ‘male menopause’ symptoms such as reduced energy, poor concentration and increased body fat. Over the past decade there has been a steep rise in the amount of testosterone dispensed in Australia and globally. [More]
Alport syndrome: an interview with Dr Paul Grint, CMO, Regulus

Alport syndrome: an interview with Dr Paul Grint, CMO, Regulus

Alport Syndrome was first described by a physician called Cecil Alport, back in the late 1920s. It's a genetic disease that affects a certain type of collagen involved in the functioning of the kidney, the ear, and the eye. [More]
Canada's current vitamin D intake recommendations need to be re-evaluated: Study

Canada's current vitamin D intake recommendations need to be re-evaluated: Study

New research finds that current national vitamin D intake recommendations are too low and that body weight must be taken into account to determine the appropriate vitamin D dose in any given individual. This is currently not the case, posing a serious Canadian public health issue with significant cost and health impacts. [More]
External artificial pancreas improves glucose control, reduces hypoglycemia risk

External artificial pancreas improves glucose control, reduces hypoglycemia risk

The world's first clinical trial comparing three alternative treatments for type 1 diabetes was conducted in Montréal by researchers at the IRCM and the University of Montreal, led by endocrinologist Dr. Rémi Rabasa-Lhoret. [More]
Hypocalcaemic seizure surveillance highlights UK public health policy failings

Hypocalcaemic seizure surveillance highlights UK public health policy failings

The occurrence of 91 confirmed or probable hypocalcaemic seizures in children with vitamin D deficiency over a 2-year period in the UK highlights a failure to promote appropriate supplementation. [More]
Study provides better glimpse at the biology of height

Study provides better glimpse at the biology of height

The largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) to date, involving more than 300 institutions and more than 250,000 subjects, roughly doubles the number of known gene regions influencing height to more than 400. [More]
ADA Maryland Chapter, WellDoc collaborate to empower patients with type 2 diabetes

ADA Maryland Chapter, WellDoc collaborate to empower patients with type 2 diabetes

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) Maryland Chapter and WellDoc®, a health care behavioral science and technology company, have announced the launch of a collaboration to empower people in Maryland with type 2 diabetes to take control of their diabetes by improving their day-to-day self-management. [More]
Viewpoints: Ebola takes us to 'uncharted waters'; the failure of workplace 'wellness' programs

Viewpoints: Ebola takes us to 'uncharted waters'; the failure of workplace 'wellness' programs

There have been more than 4,300 cases and 2,300 deaths over the past six months. Last week, the World Health Organization warned that, by early October, there may be thousands of new cases per week in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Nigeria. What is not getting said publicly, despite briefings and discussions in the inner circles of the world's public health agencies, is that we are in totally uncharted waters and that Mother Nature is the only force in charge of the crisis at this time (Michael T. Osterholm, 9/11). [More]
Gut hormone-drug combination therapy more effective at improving type 2 diabetes

Gut hormone-drug combination therapy more effective at improving type 2 diabetes

Combined treatment with a drug that mimics the action of a gut hormone and basal insulin is more effective at improving blood sugar control than other anti-diabetic treatments, with similar rates of hypoglycaemia (dangerously low blood sugar levels) and greater weight loss, a systematic review and meta-analysis published in The Lancet shows. [More]
Using a nanotech microchip to diagnose type 1 diabetes: an interview with Dr. Brian Feldman, Stanford School of Medicine

Using a nanotech microchip to diagnose type 1 diabetes: an interview with Dr. Brian Feldman, Stanford School of Medicine

The most common form of diabetes is sometimes referred to as metabolic diabetes, which is the diabetes most people are very familiar with, type 2 diabetes. This form of diabetes is most prevalent in people that are overweight or obese. Historically, it has been confined to adults or older patients but it has been on the rise as the global obesity problem has continued to worsen. [More]
Eating pistachios may reduce body's response to stresses among adults with diabetes

Eating pistachios may reduce body's response to stresses among adults with diabetes

Among people with type 2 diabetes, eating pistachios may reduce the body's response to the stresses of everyday life, according to Penn State researchers. [More]