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Pancreatic cysts increase overall risk of pancreatic cancer, study shows

Pancreatic cysts increase overall risk of pancreatic cancer, study shows

A look back at more than half a million patient records has established that patients with pancreatic cysts have a significantly higher overall risk of pancreatic cancer compared to those without such cysts, according to a study in the July issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. [More]
Scientists create new eye technology for detecting Alzheimer's before onset of symptoms

Scientists create new eye technology for detecting Alzheimer's before onset of symptoms

Scientists may have overcome a major roadblock in the development of Alzheimer's therapies by creating a new technology to observe - in the back of the eye - progression of the disease before the onset of symptoms. [More]
New method uses computer to scan esophagus images for signs of esophageal cancer

New method uses computer to scan esophagus images for signs of esophageal cancer

Recognizing the early stages of esophageal cancer is difficult because it can easily be missed. TU Eindhoven has therefore been working with the Catharina Hospital in Eindhoven to develop a method to enable a computer to scan esophagus images for signs of esophageal cancer. [More]
Study shows low incidence of cancer in patients with large colorectal polyps

Study shows low incidence of cancer in patients with large colorectal polyps

For the majority of patients with large or difficult to remove colorectal polyps (growths in the colon), the incidence of cancer is actually lower than previously thought, and using more advanced endoscopic techniques that spare the colon may be a better, safer alternative to a traditional operation in certain cases, according to study results published online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons in advance of print publication. [More]
Siemens Healthineers' new CT and MRI technologies to aid research across various common clinical pathways

Siemens Healthineers' new CT and MRI technologies to aid research across various common clinical pathways

The Transforming Outcomes and Health Economics Through Imaging (TOHETI) programme is looking to change the way medical imaging works by undertaking a range of pioneering research. [More]
Simple blood test can help track rising levels of eosinophils linked to regrowth of sinus polyps

Simple blood test can help track rising levels of eosinophils linked to regrowth of sinus polyps

In an effort to identify a simple, reliable way to track the course of nasal polyps in chronic sinus disease, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they've linked rising levels of immune system white blood cells, called eosinophils, with regrowth of polyps removed by surgery. [More]
UEG report reveals alarming trends in paediatric digestive health across Europe

UEG report reveals alarming trends in paediatric digestive health across Europe

A report investigating the current state of digestive health in children has revealed alarming trends in disease incidence and inequalities in the provision of digestive healthcare services for children across Europe. [More]
Could a new test improve bowel cancer screening uptake? An interview with Professor Halloran

Could a new test improve bowel cancer screening uptake? An interview with Professor Halloran

The most recent complete data for England (2014/15) shows an average uptake of the guaiac Faecal Occult Blood Tests (gFOBT) from those invited by the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (BCSP) of 58.22%. [More]
Potential marker of disease activity identified for eosinophilic esophagitis

Potential marker of disease activity identified for eosinophilic esophagitis

Researchers have identified a potential marker of disease activity for a severe and often painful food allergic disease called eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) - possibly sparing children with EoE the discomfort and risk of endoscopic procedures to assess whether their disease is active. [More]
PENTAX Medical releases OPTIVISTA EPK-i7010 Video Processor for more accurate endoscopic in vivo diagnosis

PENTAX Medical releases OPTIVISTA EPK-i7010 Video Processor for more accurate endoscopic in vivo diagnosis

PENTAX Medical launches a world first for endoscopy, the OPTIVISTA EPK-i7010 Video Processor, featuring both digital and optical enhancements, in the European, Middle Eastern & African (EMEA) markets. [More]
New E-Vac therapy may be promising treatment option for GI leaks

New E-Vac therapy may be promising treatment option for GI leaks

Gastroenterologists on the medical staff at Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas are evaluating a new procedure for patients with gastrointestinal (GI) leaks and perforations, a complication that can result from laparoscopic surgery on the esophagus, stomach and small intestines—and outcomes have been promising. [More]
Experimental drug ozanimod moderately effective in treatment of ulcerative colitis

Experimental drug ozanimod moderately effective in treatment of ulcerative colitis

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have shown that ozanimod (RPC1063), a novel drug molecule, is moderately effective in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Results of the Phase II clinical trial will appear in the May 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Non-invasive test to diagnose EoE could replace need for repeated endoscopy

Non-invasive test to diagnose EoE could replace need for repeated endoscopy

A non-invasive test to diagnose and monitor an inflammatory disease that injures the esophagus - called eosinophilic esophagitis or EoE - would replace the need for repeated endoscopy for a growing number of children and adults with this relatively new condition. [More]
Scientists develop innovative technique to deliver cancer drugs deep into tumour cells

Scientists develop innovative technique to deliver cancer drugs deep into tumour cells

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) have invented a new way to deliver cancer drugs deep into tumour cells. [More]
Flat adenomas may warrant keeping closer eye on patients at risk for colorectal cancer

Flat adenomas may warrant keeping closer eye on patients at risk for colorectal cancer

Being on the lookout for certain features of polyps may help physicians keep a closer eye on patients at risk for colorectal cancer. [More]
Home screening for bowel cancer: an interview with Deborah Alsina, Chief Executive of Bowel Cancer UK

Home screening for bowel cancer: an interview with Deborah Alsina, Chief Executive of Bowel Cancer UK

FIT (faecal immunochemical test) is a screening test for bowel cancer which detects hidden traces of blood in stools. It is now used in population screening around the world including Italy, The Netherlands, France, Ireland, New Zealand, Australia, Spain, Slovenia, Malta, Japan, parts of Canada, and Southeast Asia. [More]
3-D replica of teen’s skull helps surgeons remove rare, aggressive tumor

3-D replica of teen’s skull helps surgeons remove rare, aggressive tumor

What started as a stuffy-nose and mild cold symptoms for 15-year-old Parker Turchan led to a far more serious diagnosis: a rare type of tumor in his nose and sinuses that extended through his skull near his brain. [More]
UEG, ESGE outline first phase of recommendations to improve endoscopy quality standards across Europe

UEG, ESGE outline first phase of recommendations to improve endoscopy quality standards across Europe

Every year, tens of millions of individuals across Europe undergo endoscopic procedures to assist with the diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal diseases. [More]
Fecal transplants transfer bacterial viruses that appear to be harmless to humans

Fecal transplants transfer bacterial viruses that appear to be harmless to humans

Communities of viruses can be transferred during fecal transplants, according to a study published this week in mBio, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. Fortunately for patients who use this procedure, the viruses found to be transmitted in this study appear to be harmless to humans. [More]
Simple method to determine prevalence of celiac disease in children aged 2-4

Simple method to determine prevalence of celiac disease in children aged 2-4

Researchers from the University of Granada have developed a new, simple and non invasive method which allows to determine whether a child aged 2-4 suffers from celiac disease or not without the necessity of a blood extraction. [More]
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