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Moffitt researchers hope to improve pancreatic cancer survival rates by developing blood test to identify IPMNs

Moffitt researchers hope to improve pancreatic cancer survival rates by developing blood test to identify IPMNs

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in the United States and has a 5-year survival rate of only 6 percent, which is the lowest rate of all types of cancer according to the American Cancer Society. [More]
New endoscopic system differentiates between malignant and benign tumors in gastrointestinal tract

New endoscopic system differentiates between malignant and benign tumors in gastrointestinal tract

Cancer or no cancer? This question can usually only be answered after a days-long wait for a histological examination. With the use of a mass spectrometric technique, the answer may soon be available in real time. [More]
Women who conceive babies through IVF at increased risk of experiencing GORD

Women who conceive babies through IVF at increased risk of experiencing GORD

Women who give birth to babies conceived by in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) are at increased risk of experiencing long-term symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), according to the results of a study published in the UEG Journal. [More]
New endoscopic probe could facilitate more effective, less painful imaging of internal tissues

New endoscopic probe could facilitate more effective, less painful imaging of internal tissues

Colonoscopy is a safe and effective medical procedure that's proven to saves lives. Used for routine cancer screening, it can help identify colon tumors in their early stages. In addition, it is a key non-surgical imaging technique that allows doctors to spot ulcers, polyps or bleeding inside the large intestines of their patients safely, avoiding complications that an exploratory surgery might induce. [More]
New review article analyzes pros and cons of different treatment approaches to gallbladder disease

New review article analyzes pros and cons of different treatment approaches to gallbladder disease

More than 25 million Americans have gallstones, and each year about 1 million new cases are diagnosed. Each year about 1.8 million people develop abdominal pain as a result of gallstones and go see a doctor about it. About 40 percent of these, more than 725,000 people a year, ultimately have surgery to resolve the problem. [More]
CU research suggests safe, lower-cost way to treat upper gastrointestinal tract problems in children

CU research suggests safe, lower-cost way to treat upper gastrointestinal tract problems in children

Physicians at the University of Colorado School of Medicine on the Anschutz Medical Campus have published research that suggests a safe and lower-cost way to diagnose and treat problems in the upper gastrointestinal tract of children. [More]
Colorectal cancer patients diagnosed during screening colonoscopy survive longer

Colorectal cancer patients diagnosed during screening colonoscopy survive longer

Patients whose colorectal cancer (CRC) is detected during a screening colonoscopy are likely to survive longer than those who wait until they have symptoms before having the test, according to a study in the July issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. [More]
Scientists detail how stereomicroscopy can help in assessing issues within gastrointestinal tract

Scientists detail how stereomicroscopy can help in assessing issues within gastrointestinal tract

A technology whose roots date to the 1800s has the potential to offer an extraordinary new advantage to modern-day medicine. [More]
New breath test could help diagnose oesophageal and gastric cancer in minutes

New breath test could help diagnose oesophageal and gastric cancer in minutes

Researchers have devised a breath test that can help doctors diagnose the early signs of oesophageal and gastric cancer in minutes. [More]

OmniVision introduces CameraChip sensor for medical and industrial applications

OmniVision Technologies, Inc., a leading developer of advanced digital imaging solutions, today announced a new ultra-compact CameraChip sensor for medical and industrial applications. [More]
Vitamin D supplementation may affect intestinal barrier dysfunction associated with Crohn's disease

Vitamin D supplementation may affect intestinal barrier dysfunction associated with Crohn's disease

New research published in this month's edition of United European Gastroenterology journal suggests that supplementation with vitamin D may impact on the intestinal barrier dysfunction associated with Crohn's disease, and could have a role in the treatment of the condition. [More]

Percentage of female authorship in gastroenterology journals remains lower than expected

The percentage of U.S. female physician authors of original research in major gastroenterology journals has grown over time, yet the percentage of women in the senior author position remains lower than expected based on the proportion of female gastroenterologists in academia. [More]
Physicians Endoscopy and Garden State Endoscopy Center finalize joint venture relationship

Physicians Endoscopy and Garden State Endoscopy Center finalize joint venture relationship

Physicians Endoscopy , and the physician partners of Garden State Endoscopy Center, are pleased to announce on May 6th, 2015, the two organizations finalized a joint venture relationship. [More]
Only 50% of men can remember their last medical check-up, shows new national survey

Only 50% of men can remember their last medical check-up, shows new national survey

A new national survey about men and their cars, commissioned by Orlando Health, found that more than 80 percent of men could remember the make and model of their first car, but only about half could remember the last time they went to the doctor for a check-up. [More]
NGS mutational testing can help detect patients with Barrett's esophagus

NGS mutational testing can help detect patients with Barrett's esophagus

Barrett's esophagus (BE) develops in a subset of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and can increase the risk of developing cancer of the esophagus. Although periodic surveillance for cancer is recommended for BE patients, these examinations may fail to identify pre-cancerous dysplasia and early cancers. [More]
Portable microendoscope could eliminate need for costly biopsies for esophageal cancer patients

Portable microendoscope could eliminate need for costly biopsies for esophageal cancer patients

In a clinical study of patients in the United States and China, researchers found that a low-cost, portable, battery-powered microendoscope developed by Rice University bioengineers could eventually eliminate the need for costly biopsies for many patients undergoing standard endoscopic screening for esophageal cancer. [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers examine how human factors contribute to surgical errors

Mayo Clinic researchers examine how human factors contribute to surgical errors

Why are major surgical errors called "never events?" Because they shouldn't happen — but do. Mayo Clinic researchers identified 69 never events among 1.5 million invasive procedures performed over five years and detailed why each occurred. Using a system created to investigate military plane crashes, they coded the human behaviors involved to identify any environmental, organizational, job and individual characteristics that led to the never events. [More]
LSDF awards $2.9 million in funding to help commercialize major medical breakthroughs

LSDF awards $2.9 million in funding to help commercialize major medical breakthroughs

Celiac disease-safe wheat, premature infant pain detection, and new medicines to fight flu and cancer are among the ideas to receive $2.9 million in funding from Washington's Life Sciences Discovery Fund (LSDF). [More]
Study explores how our intestinal tract changes as we age

Study explores how our intestinal tract changes as we age

Scientists and clinicians on the Norwich Research Park have carried out the first detailed study of how our intestinal tract changes as we age, and how this determines our overall health. [More]
Current menopausal hormone therapy users at increased risk of experiencing GI bleeding

Current menopausal hormone therapy users at increased risk of experiencing GI bleeding

Current users of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) are more than twice as likely than non-users to develop lower gastrointestinal bleeding and ischemic colitis, especially if they use the therapy for longer durations, according to a study at Digestive Disease Week 2015. [More]
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