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Study reveals benefit of early screening for vascular disorder patent ductus arteriosus among preterm infants

Study reveals benefit of early screening for vascular disorder patent ductus arteriosus among preterm infants

Among extremely preterm infants, early screening for the vascular disorder patent ductus arteriosus before day 3 of life was associated with a lower risk of in-hospital death and pulmonary hemorrhage, but not with differences in other severe complications, according to a study in the June 23/30 issue of JAMA. [More]
JAMA: Extremely preterm infants enrolled in randomized clinical trials experience neither better nor worse outcomes

JAMA: Extremely preterm infants enrolled in randomized clinical trials experience neither better nor worse outcomes

In a group of more than 5,000 extremely preterm infants, important in-hospital outcomes were neither better nor worse in infants enrolled in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) compared with eligible but nonenrolled infants, findings that may provide reassurance regarding concerns about performing RCTs in this vulnerable population, according to a study in the June 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
Nutrinia's NTRA-9620 granted FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of short bowel syndrome

Nutrinia's NTRA-9620 granted FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of short bowel syndrome

Nutrinia, developing therapies to treat rare gastrointestinal disorders, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted orphan drug designation for the company's orally-administered drug for treating short bowel syndrome (SBS) in patients of all ages. Nutrinia plans to begin a pivotal clinical trial in this indication. [More]

Lactobacillus reuteri may reduce risk of necrotizing enterocolitis in premature infants

A new study finds that supplementing enteral nutrition with Lactobacillus reuteri (L. reuteri) DSM 17938 as a probiotic may reduce the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in premature infants. [More]
Scientists reveal how breast milk prevents necrotizing enterocolitis in premature babies

Scientists reveal how breast milk prevents necrotizing enterocolitis in premature babies

The immune-boosting properties of breast milk have long been known. Now a team of scientists led by Johns Hopkins pediatric surgeon-in-chief David Hackam, M.D., Ph.D., says experiments in mice reveal how breast milk works to ward off the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a devastating intestinal disorder that affects 12 percent of premature babies and claims the lives of one in four of those who have it. [More]
New standardized approach for feeding infants in NICU improves growth of babies

New standardized approach for feeding infants in NICU improves growth of babies

A new standardized approach for feeding infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) helps babies attain full oral feeds sooner, improves their growth and sends them home sooner. [More]
Eight clinical researchers selected as finalists for Outstanding Investigator Award at Cardiology 2015

Eight clinical researchers selected as finalists for Outstanding Investigator Award at Cardiology 2015

Pediatric cardiology researchers and clinicians from numerous centers from around the world are gathering at the Cardiology 2015: the 18th Annual Update on Pediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease conference, sponsored by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Phoenix Children's Hospital on Feb. 11 to Feb. 15 in Scottsdale, Ariz. [More]
Researchers to present report on impact of fetal gender on preterm birth risk at The Pregnancy Meeting

Researchers to present report on impact of fetal gender on preterm birth risk at The Pregnancy Meeting

In a study to be presented on Feb. 7 in an oral concurrent session at 8 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, in San Diego, researchers will report on the impact of fetal gender on the risk of preterm birth and neonatal outcome. [More]
CHLA scientists grow tissue-engineered small intestine from human cells

CHLA scientists grow tissue-engineered small intestine from human cells

A new study by researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles has shown that tissue-engineered small intestine grown from human cells replicates key aspects of a functioning human intestine. The tissue-engineered small intestine they developed contains important elements of the mucosal lining and support structures, including the ability to absorb sugars, and even tiny or ultra-structural components like cellular connections. [More]
Increasing length of breastfeeding could save over £40 million annually for NHS

Increasing length of breastfeeding could save over £40 million annually for NHS

The NHS could save more than £40 million a year by increasing the length of time that mothers breastfeed, according to research carried out at Brunel University London. [More]
Children who require long-term parenteral nutrition are at risk of IAFLD

Children who require long-term parenteral nutrition are at risk of IAFLD

Children who require long-term parenteral nutrition are at risk of a potentially devastating complication called intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IAFLD). The diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of IAFLD are discussed in a new position paper in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]
Growth factors present in human breast milk may protect against intestinal damage

Growth factors present in human breast milk may protect against intestinal damage

Studies Suggest that ErbB4 Receptor Activation May Be a Novel Therapeutic Avenue for Intestinal Diseases Involving Epithelial Cell Death, According to Research Published in The American Journal of Pathology [More]
Breast milk may protect premature infants from intestinal destruction

Breast milk may protect premature infants from intestinal destruction

Premature infants are at increased risk for a potentially lethal gastrointestinal disease called necrotizing enterocolitis, or NEC. [More]
Human milk diet protects intestines and supports growth of premature infants

Human milk diet protects intestines and supports growth of premature infants

For premature infants, adequate growth while in the neonatal intensive care unit is an indicator of better long-term health and developmental outcomes. [More]
Bacteria may depend more on gastrointestinal age than on environmental factors in babies

Bacteria may depend more on gastrointestinal age than on environmental factors in babies

Scientists believe babies are born with digestive systems containing few or no bacteria. Their guts then quickly become colonized by microbes — good and bad — as they nurse or take bottles, receive medication and even as they are passed from one adoring relative to another. [More]
Heart rate may identify premature infants at risk of developing necrotizing enterocolitis

Heart rate may identify premature infants at risk of developing necrotizing enterocolitis

Measuring variability of heart rate may identify premature infants at risk of developing necrotizing enterocolitis, a serious inflammatory condition that can lead to death, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Medela signs agreement to acquire enteral feeding assets of Acacia

Medela signs agreement to acquire enteral feeding assets of Acacia

Medela today announced the signing of an agreement to acquire the enteral feeding assets of Acacia, Inc., a Brea, Calif.-based company that designs and produces a line of high-quality neonatal feeding devices. [More]
Bristol-Myers Squibb to present new immunotherapy study data at ASCO Annual Meeting

Bristol-Myers Squibb to present new immunotherapy study data at ASCO Annual Meeting

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company today announced that new data from studies investigating its immunotherapies in adjuvant and advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) will be presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago from May 30-June 3. [More]
AGA Research Foundation announces 2014 AGA Research Scholars

AGA Research Foundation announces 2014 AGA Research Scholars

The American Gastroenterological Association Research Foundation is pleased to announce the 2014 AGA Research Scholars. The AGA Research Scholar Awards program, launched in 1984, enables young investigators to develop independent and productive research careers in digestive diseases. This year, the AGA Research Scholar Awards fund an additional year allowing for three consecutive years of funding. [More]
Concordia Healthcare enters into definitive agreement to acquire Donnatal

Concordia Healthcare enters into definitive agreement to acquire Donnatal

Concordia Healthcare Corp., announced today that it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Donnatal®, an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome ("IBS") and acute enterocolitis, from a privately held specialty pharmaceutical company carrying on business as Revive Pharmaceuticals ("Revive Pharmaceuticals"). [More]
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