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Smokers who quit early does not qualify for lung cancer screening, say Mayo Clinic researchers

Smokers who quit early does not qualify for lung cancer screening, say Mayo Clinic researchers

A decline in smoking rates may mean that many people who could have benefited from early detection of lung cancer are dying because they don't qualify for low-dose CT scans, according to a group of Mayo Clinic researchers. [More]
Study reveals how household net worth affects breast cancer care

Study reveals how household net worth affects breast cancer care

Household net worth is a major and overlooked factor in adherence to hormonal therapy among breast cancer patients and partially explains racial disparities in quality of care. The findings suggest that physicians, health insurers, and policy makers need to pay more attention to this economic variable to ensure that breast cancer patients receive this potentially life-saving treatment. [More]
Study: Airport screening for disease often misses infected travellers, but can be improved

Study: Airport screening for disease often misses infected travellers, but can be improved

Scientists have shown that airport screening for disease will often miss half or more of infected travellers, but can be improved by customizing to pathogens. [More]
Many women fail to understand risks of unapproved, untested bioidentical hormone therapies

Many women fail to understand risks of unapproved, untested bioidentical hormone therapies

From 28% to 68% of women using hormones at menopause take compounded, so-called "bioidentical" hormones, but women don't understand the risks of these unapproved, untested treatments, shows an analysis of two large surveys, which was published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Palbociclib extends progression-free survival in advanced breast cancer patients

Palbociclib extends progression-free survival in advanced breast cancer patients

Palbociclib, an investigational oral medication that works by blocking molecules responsible for cancer cell growth, is well tolerated and extends progression-free survival (PFS) in newly diagnosed, advanced breast cancer patients, including those whose disease has stopped responding to traditional endocrine treatments. [More]
Research findings lay groundwork for improving treatment assessment for men with prostate cancer

Research findings lay groundwork for improving treatment assessment for men with prostate cancer

UCLA researchers have found that radiation therapy is the most common treatment for men with prostate cancer regardless of the aggressiveness of the tumor, risk to the patient and overall patient prognosis. These findings lay the groundwork for improved treatment assessment by physicians and to better inform men fighting the disease. [More]
New study finds that statins may not reduce risk for Parkinson's disease

New study finds that statins may not reduce risk for Parkinson's disease

The use of statins may not be associated with lowering risk for Parkinson's disease, according to a new study led by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The findings cast doubts on reports suggesting that the cholesterol-lowering medications may protect against this neurodegenerative brain disorder. [More]
Unhealthy foods outpace beneficial dietary changes in middle-income nations

Unhealthy foods outpace beneficial dietary changes in middle-income nations

In a first-of-its-kind analysis of worldwide dietary patterns, a team including researchers from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University and the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge found overall diet quality worsened across the world even as consumption of healthier foods increased in many countries. [More]
Einstein researchers find possible clue to why older mothers have babies born with Down syndrome

Einstein researchers find possible clue to why older mothers have babies born with Down syndrome

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found a possible clue to why older mothers face a higher risk for having babies born with conditions such as Down syndrome that are characterized by abnormal chromosome numbers. [More]
NIAID expands Tuberculosis Research Units program to drive innovation in TB research

NIAID expands Tuberculosis Research Units program to drive innovation in TB research

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, is expanding its Tuberculosis Research Units program in an effort to drive innovation in tuberculosis (TB) research. NIAID is awarding up to $15.2 million in fiscal year 2015 and as much as $105.3 million over seven years to fund four institutions that will act as a collaborative TBRU network. [More]
Scientists identify role of tau-associated MAPT gene in development of Alzheimer's disease

Scientists identify role of tau-associated MAPT gene in development of Alzheimer's disease

An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has identified the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) gene as increasing the risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Training modules for emergency department staff to treat infectious disease patients available on CDC's website

Training modules for emergency department staff to treat infectious disease patients available on CDC's website

Four Web-based training modules developed by Johns Hopkins Medicine for emergency department personnel who treat patients with infectious diseases are now available on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. [More]
Survey finds high levels of abuse, serious harm associated with human trafficking

Survey finds high levels of abuse, serious harm associated with human trafficking

The largest survey to date of the health of trafficking survivors has found high levels of abuse and serious harm associated with human trafficking. For the first time, the findings reveal severe mental and physical health problems experienced by men, women and children trafficked for forced labour and sexual exploitation in Southeast Asia. [More]
Primary care nurse-led intervention improves physical activity among older adults

Primary care nurse-led intervention improves physical activity among older adults

A primary care nurse-delivered intervention can lead to sustained increases in physical activity (PA) among older adults, according to an article published by Tess Harris of St George's University of London, and colleagues in this week's PLOS Medicine. The trial was funded by the National Institute for Health Research. [More]
Researchers say that cancer experience can lead to healthy lifestyle in survivors and family members

Researchers say that cancer experience can lead to healthy lifestyle in survivors and family members

After studying cancer survivors and their family caregivers, researchers at Case Western Reserve University conclude that the period between the final cancer treatment and first post-treatment checkup may be an ideal time for the entire household to jumpstart a healthy lifestyle. [More]
Eight clinical researchers selected as finalists for Outstanding Investigator Award at Cardiology 2015

Eight clinical researchers selected as finalists for Outstanding Investigator Award at Cardiology 2015

Pediatric cardiology researchers and clinicians from numerous centers from around the world are gathering at the Cardiology 2015: the 18th Annual Update on Pediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease conference, sponsored by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Phoenix Children's Hospital on Feb. 11 to Feb. 15 in Scottsdale, Ariz. [More]
Researchers report first evidence of Seoul hantavirus in wild rats in the Netherlands

Researchers report first evidence of Seoul hantavirus in wild rats in the Netherlands

In a paper just published in the peer reviewed journal Infection, Ecology & Epidemiology, researchers report discovering the first evidence of Seoul hantavirus (SEOV) in the wild rat population in the Netherlands. The discovery comes on the heels of similar ones in France, Belgium and the United Kingdom in recent years, and has some researchers concerned about the potential spread of the virus to humans. [More]
Study evaluates recent sleep trends for U.S. adolescents

Study evaluates recent sleep trends for U.S. adolescents

Sufficient sleep is critical for adolescent health, yet the number of hours slept per night has decreased among teenagers in the United States over the last 20 years. A study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found that female students, racial/ethnic minorities, and students of lower socioeconomic status are particularly affected, with teens in these categories less likely to report regularly getting seven or more hours of sleep each night compared with their male counterparts, non-Hispanic white teenagers, and students of higher socioeconomic status, respectively. [More]
Climate change causes emergence of more infectious diseases

Climate change causes emergence of more infectious diseases

The appearance of infectious diseases in new places and new hosts, such as West Nile virus and Ebola, is a predictable result of climate change, says a noted zoologist affiliated with the Harold W. Manter Laboratory of Parasitology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. [More]
New electronic model holds promise of revolutionizing shared decision-making in doctor's office

New electronic model holds promise of revolutionizing shared decision-making in doctor's office

Traditional decision aids to help patient-doctor discussions have drawbacks, but a new electronic model developed by McMaster University researchers holds promise of revolutionizing shared decision-making in the doctor's office with the touch of an electronic tablet. [More]