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Diet rich in soy may help feminine hearts, but timing matters

Diet rich in soy may help feminine hearts, but timing matters

A diet rich in soy may help feminine hearts, but timing matters, finds a new study published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

The University of Maryland Schools of Dentistry (UM SOD) and Medicine (UM SOM) jointly announced today that they have received a five-year $10.7 million grant award from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health to study the causes, prevention and treatment of sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs). [More]
Tuberculosis in children: an interview with Dr Peter Dodd, University of Sheffield

Tuberculosis in children: an interview with Dr Peter Dodd, University of Sheffield

It was recently announced that new estimates indicated over 650,000 children develop tuberculosis (TB) every year in the 22 countries with a high burden of the disease (HBCs). Which countries are these and why are so many children developing TB in these areas? [More]
New stem-cell discovery may lead to more streamlined process for tissue regeneration

New stem-cell discovery may lead to more streamlined process for tissue regeneration

A new stem-cell discovery might one day lead to a more streamlined process for obtaining stem cells, which in turn could be used in the development of replacement tissue for failing body parts, according to UC San Francisco scientists who reported the findings in the current edition of Cell. [More]
Mothers who live near green spaces deliver babies with higher birth weights

Mothers who live near green spaces deliver babies with higher birth weights

Mothers who live near green spaces deliver babies with significantly higher birth weights, according to a new study, "Green Spaces and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes" published in the journal, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. [More]
Researchers examine impact of extreme temperatures on number of deaths

Researchers examine impact of extreme temperatures on number of deaths

When temperatures are extremely high or low, there is a significant increase in the number of deaths caused by heart failure or stroke. [More]
"Fist bumping" transmits significantly fewer bacteria than handshaking

"Fist bumping" transmits significantly fewer bacteria than handshaking

"Fist bumping" transmits significantly fewer bacteria than either handshaking or high-fiving, while still addressing the cultural expectation of hand-to-hand contact between patients and clinicians, according to a study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). [More]
Norovirus vaccines: an interview with Dr Benjamin Lopman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA

Norovirus vaccines: an interview with Dr Benjamin Lopman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA

Noroviruses are a group of viruses. They're the leading cause of gastroenteritis, which causes diarrhea and vomiting. They affect the whole age range from young children to the elderly, and, in the US, they cause about 20 million cases annually. [More]
PLXNA4 gene may increase risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

PLXNA4 gene may increase risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine report variants in a new gene, PLXNA4, which may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). The discovery of this novel genetic association may lead to new drug treatment options that target PLXNA4 specifically. [More]
Lifestyle impacts likelihood of developing metabolic syndrome in childhood cancer survivors

Lifestyle impacts likelihood of developing metabolic syndrome in childhood cancer survivors

A St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study found that 73 percent of adult survivors of childhood cancer more than doubled their risk of developing metabolic syndrome and related health problems by failing to follow a heart-healthy lifestyle. The results appear in the current issue of the journal Cancer. [More]
Montefiore-Einstein investigators to present new findings from eight abstracts at IFHNOS 2014

Montefiore-Einstein investigators to present new findings from eight abstracts at IFHNOS 2014

Clinicians and researchers from Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University will present new findings from eight abstracts at the International Federation of Head and Neck Oncologic Societies World Congress being held July 26 - July 30 in New York. [More]
New book describes worldwide initiatives to prevent the crisis of obesity and diabetes

New book describes worldwide initiatives to prevent the crisis of obesity and diabetes

Prediabetes and Diabetes increasingly consume the healthcare community and remain priority areas that require immediate attention. [More]
RI Defeats Hepatitis C project aims to eliminate HCV in Rhode Island

RI Defeats Hepatitis C project aims to eliminate HCV in Rhode Island

Lynn E. Taylor, M.D., director of The Miriam Hospital's HIV/Viral Hepatitis Coinfection program, states in the July, 2014 Rhode Island Medical Journal special edition, "RI Defeats Hep C" that eliminating hepatitis c virus infection (hep c or HCV) is feasible, can provide economic benefits, enhance capacity to address other health challenges, and improve health care disparities. [More]

Key market data on Australia’s capsule endoscopy systems market

"Australia Capsule Endoscopy Systems Market Outlook to 2020″, provides key market data on the Australia Capsule Endoscopy Systems market. [More]
Researchers examine association between ritual circumcision procedure and HSV-1 in infants

Researchers examine association between ritual circumcision procedure and HSV-1 in infants

A rare procedure occasionally performed during Jewish circumcisions that involves direct oral suction is a likely source of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) transmissions documented in infants between 1988 and 2012, a literature review conducted by Penn Medicine researchers and published online in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society found. [More]
Unemployment increases risk of death, but recessions decrease it

Unemployment increases risk of death, but recessions decrease it

Being unemployed increases your risk of death, but recessions decrease it. Sound paradoxical? Researchers thought so too. [More]
New research aims to estimate benefits of different ways to combat TB in people with diabetes

New research aims to estimate benefits of different ways to combat TB in people with diabetes

New research aims to estimate the benefits of different ways to carry out screening both patients with tuberculosis (TB) for diabetes and the other way around in parts of the world where both diseases are common. [More]
Tackling hepatitis C: an interview with Gaston Picchio, Global Hepatitis Disease Area Leader at Janssen

Tackling hepatitis C: an interview with Gaston Picchio, Global Hepatitis Disease Area Leader at Janssen

Gaston Picchio outlines the major findings of the recent report published by The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU): ‘Tackling hepatitis C: Moving towards an integrated policy approach’ [More]
Researchers propose ‘microbiome cloud model’ to understand variation in individual's microbiome composition

Researchers propose ‘microbiome cloud model’ to understand variation in individual's microbiome composition

The Human Microbiome Project (HMP) is a global initiative to identify and characterize the microorganisms present at multiple sites in the human body. [More]
Students playing high school lacrosse are exposed to more injuries during practice

Students playing high school lacrosse are exposed to more injuries during practice

With over 170,000 students now playing high school lacrosse, more and more are being exposed to injuries during practice and competition, according to a new study from the Colorado School of Public Health and the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. [More]