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Common drug used for treating fungal infections in lung transplant recipients increases risk for skin cancer, death

Common drug used for treating fungal infections in lung transplant recipients increases risk for skin cancer, death

Voriconazole, a prescription drug commonly used to treat fungal infections in lung transplant recipients, significantly increases the risk for skin cancer and even death, according to a new study by UC San Francisco researchers. [More]
Reducing SSB intake among children and adolescents associated with greater increase in HDL-C

Reducing SSB intake among children and adolescents associated with greater increase in HDL-C

In the first study to investigate blood lipid levels in association with consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) in a racially and ethnically diverse sample of Boston area schoolchildren, researchers found there was an inverse association between SSB intake changes and HDL-cholesterol increases (HDL-C is the "good cholesterol"). [More]
Bedwetting symptom may help identify OSA in post-menopausal women

Bedwetting symptom may help identify OSA in post-menopausal women

The results of a new study suggest that nocturnal enuresis, or bedwetting, may be an additional symptom that doctors can look for when assessing post-menopausal women for obstructive sleep apnea. That condition left untreated can lead to serious medical problems, such as cardiovascular disease, as organs are undersupplied with oxygen. [More]
FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil)

FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil)

Allergan plc today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the company's supplemental new drug application (sNDA) to update the label for TEFLARO (ceftaroline fosamil) for the treatment of adult patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). [More]
Simplified handwashing routine helps lower sickness-related absenteeism for students with MID

Simplified handwashing routine helps lower sickness-related absenteeism for students with MID

A simplified handwashing routine, with five steps instead of seven, helps to reduce sickness-related absenteeism for students with mild intellectual disability (MID), according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
GARFIELD-AF Registry: All-cause death is most frequent major event in newly diagnosed AF patients

GARFIELD-AF Registry: All-cause death is most frequent major event in newly diagnosed AF patients

The first-ever two-year outcomes from the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field - Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) showcased at ESC Congress 2015 expose that all-cause death was the most frequent major event in more than 17,000 newly diagnosed AF patients, far exceeding the rate of stroke or major bleeding. [More]
Reduction in television viewing may cut injury risk in individuals with hostile personality traits

Reduction in television viewing may cut injury risk in individuals with hostile personality traits

People with hostile personality traits who watch more television than their peers may be at a greater risk for injury, potentially because they are more susceptible to the influence of television on violence and risk-taking behaviors, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health analysis discovered. [More]
New UC Davis Environmental Health Sciences Center launched to protect communities from unhealthy exposures

New UC Davis Environmental Health Sciences Center launched to protect communities from unhealthy exposures

A cross-disciplinary center focused on identifying connections between environmental toxins and disease has been established at UC Davis Health System with the ultimate goal of developing preventions and policies that protect communities from unhealthy exposures. [More]
UC Davis Health System research shows that increasing minimum wage may reduce smoking rates

UC Davis Health System research shows that increasing minimum wage may reduce smoking rates

In addition to restricting when and where tobacco is used at work, UC Davis Health System research shows that employers can do something else to reduce smoking: raise wages. [More]
Researchers discover that vitamin D may play significant role in preventing AMD among women

Researchers discover that vitamin D may play significant role in preventing AMD among women

Vitamin D has been studied extensively in relation to bone health as well as cancer. Now, a team led by a researcher at the University at Buffalo has discovered that vitamin D may play a significant role in eye health, specifically in the possible prevention of age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, among women who are more genetically prone to developing the sight-damaging disease. [More]
Watching TV linked to subsequent obesity for young adults

Watching TV linked to subsequent obesity for young adults

The more hours young adults spend watching television each day, the greater the likelihood that they'll have a higher body mass index and bigger waist circumference, a 15-year analysis by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health revealed. [More]
Study: Knee or hip replacement surgery may increase heart attack risk

Study: Knee or hip replacement surgery may increase heart attack risk

Contrary to recent reports, Boston-based researchers found that osteoarthritis patients who had total knee or hip joint replacement surgery, known as arthroplasty, were at increased risk of heart attack (myocardial infarction) in the early post-operative period. [More]
Probiotics do not help prevent gastrointestinal colonization with MDROs in critically ill patients

Probiotics do not help prevent gastrointestinal colonization with MDROs in critically ill patients

Probiotics show no benefit for preventing or eliminating gastrointestinal colonization with drug-resistant organisms in patients in the intensive care unit compared to standard care, according to new research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
OU and Mercy receive $2.5 million grant to develop new short-term breast cancer risk prediction models

OU and Mercy receive $2.5 million grant to develop new short-term breast cancer risk prediction models

The University of Oklahoma and Mercy Hospital Oklahoma City are developing new short-term breast cancer risk prediction models that aim to help increase cancer detection of breast magnetic resonance imaging screening. [More]
Moffitt researchers hope to improve pancreatic cancer survival rates by developing blood test to identify IPMNs

Moffitt researchers hope to improve pancreatic cancer survival rates by developing blood test to identify IPMNs

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in the United States and has a 5-year survival rate of only 6 percent, which is the lowest rate of all types of cancer according to the American Cancer Society. [More]
Study: 10% of mothers reported chronic depressive symptoms 2 years after Hurricane Katrina

Study: 10% of mothers reported chronic depressive symptoms 2 years after Hurricane Katrina

About 10 percent of mothers experienced chronic, persistent depressive symptoms two years after Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast, killing more than 1,800 people, displacing hundreds of thousands and causing widespread damage estimated at more than $100 billion, according to a Georgia State University study. [More]
Probiotics show no benefit in preventing gastrointestinal colonization with drug-resistant microbes in ICU patients

Probiotics show no benefit in preventing gastrointestinal colonization with drug-resistant microbes in ICU patients

Compared with routine medical care, probiotics administered to critically ill patients in intensive care units showed no benefit in preventing the colonization of drug-resistant microbes in the intestinal tract, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Single dose of oral cholera vaccine could save more lives in crisis situations

Single dose of oral cholera vaccine could save more lives in crisis situations

An oral cholera vaccine that is in short supply could treat more people and save more lives in crisis situations, if one dose were dispensed instead of the recommended two, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
New Pitt analysis reveals causes of stillbirth among obese women

New Pitt analysis reveals causes of stillbirth among obese women

Obese women are nearly twice as likely as their lean counterparts to have stillborn babies for several specific, potentially preventable medical reasons, a new University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health analysis reveals. [More]
Commonly used heart attack blood test may identify people at risk for hypertension

Commonly used heart attack blood test may identify people at risk for hypertension

Analysis of blood samples from more than 5,000 people suggests that a more sensitive version of a blood test long used to verify heart muscle damage from heart attacks could also identify people on their way to developing hypertension well before the so-called silent killer shows up on a blood pressure machine. [More]
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