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Surrogate endpoints for cancer drug approval often lack formal empirical verification

Surrogate endpoints for cancer drug approval often lack formal empirical verification

Surrogate endpoints used to support the majority of new cancer drugs approved in the U.S. often lack formal study, according to the authors of a study published in the June issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
Cell phone radiation exposure may lead to increased rates of rare cancers

Cell phone radiation exposure may lead to increased rates of rare cancers

According to new report from Microwave News, the U.S. National Toxicology Program has found increased rates of rare cancers of the heart and brain in animals exposed to cell phone radiation in a long-awaited multi-million dollar two-year study. [More]
Healthy lifestyle may help women reduce chances of developing breast cancer

Healthy lifestyle may help women reduce chances of developing breast cancer

Women with a high risk of developing breast cancer based on family history and genetic risk can still reduce the chance they will develop the disease in their lifetimes by following a healthy lifestyle, new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]
Gene expression patterns of normal tissue may predict survival rates of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients

Gene expression patterns of normal tissue may predict survival rates of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients

Breast tissue surrounding tumors could be used to gauge future survival outcomes for women with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, a study led by University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers has found. [More]
Free screening colonoscopies for uninsured, high-risk CRC patients may help in early detection of cancer

Free screening colonoscopies for uninsured, high-risk CRC patients may help in early detection of cancer

For uninsured patients who are at a high risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), performing free screening colonoscopies can identify cancer at an earlier stage and appears to be cost neutral from a hospital system perspective, according to study results published online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons ahead of print publication. [More]
Majority of young adults with abdominal obesity unaware of CKD risk

Majority of young adults with abdominal obesity unaware of CKD risk

Many young adults with abdominal obesity exhibit a readily detectable risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), yet the vast majority don't know they're at risk, according to a study of nationwide health data led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers that was published online today in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
New data visualization platform identifies shortfalls in vaccine introduction and coverage

New data visualization platform identifies shortfalls in vaccine introduction and coverage

As the 69th World Health Assembly discusses progress on the Global Vaccine Action Plan, a new data visualization platform--from the International Vaccine Access Center at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health--provides stark numbers on where shortfalls exist in vaccine introduction and coverage. [More]
Study provides better understanding of sequence of genetic events in colorectal cancer premalignancy

Study provides better understanding of sequence of genetic events in colorectal cancer premalignancy

Whole-exome sequencing of both colorectal adenomas (precancers often called polyps) and intestinal mucosa at risk for developing into adenomas from patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) has generated a comprehensive picture of the genomic alterations that characterize the evolution of normal mucosa to precancer. [More]
Depressive symptoms may affect fertility of women

Depressive symptoms may affect fertility of women

Women with severe depressive symptoms have a decreased chance of becoming pregnant, while the use of psychotropic medications does not appear to harm fertility, a study by researchers from the Boston University Schools of Public Health and Medicine shows. [More]
Study highlights disparities in care for disadvantaged children with traumatic brain injuries

Study highlights disparities in care for disadvantaged children with traumatic brain injuries

Children who suffer traumatic brain injuries can face a difficult road to recovery, requiring services such as physical therapy and mental health treatment for months or years to get their young lives back on track. [More]
Researchers identify mutations that may stimulate early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue

Researchers identify mutations that may stimulate early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered mutations that may fuel early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue from high-risk patients. [More]
Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Scientists of the German Center for Diabetes Research led by the German Institute of Human Nutrition have shown in a mouse model that the epigenetic modification of the Igfbp2 gene observed in the young animal precedes a fatty liver in the adult animal later in life. [More]
Low-salt diets may increase CVD risk and death compared to average salt consumption

Low-salt diets may increase CVD risk and death compared to average salt consumption

A large worldwide study has found that, contrary to popular thought, low-salt diets may not be beneficial and may actually increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death compared to average salt consumption. [More]
Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Four major phenotypes may help improve prediction, prevention of cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes

Prediabetes is associated with increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dementia and cancer. However, the disease risk considerably varies among subjects. [More]
Higher adolescent intake of saturated fat linked to higher dense breast volume in early adulthood

Higher adolescent intake of saturated fat linked to higher dense breast volume in early adulthood

Consuming high amounts of saturated fat or low amounts of mono- and polyunsaturated fats as an adolescent was associated with higher breast density in young adulthood. Breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer. [More]
UK-wide study reveals AOD prescription rates for women decrease in last 10 years

UK-wide study reveals AOD prescription rates for women decrease in last 10 years

A UK-wide study looking at the prescribing of anti-osteoporotic drugs (AOD) to people aged 50 years or above has found that, since 2006, AOD prescription rates for women have decreased and rates for men have levelled off, despite a growing elderly population and associated fracture risks. [More]
Overreaction to Zika virus threat could affect psychological well-being of U.S. citizens

Overreaction to Zika virus threat could affect psychological well-being of U.S. citizens

Vector biologist Laura Harrington and chair of the Department of Entomology at Cornell University says overreaction to the threat of Zika virus in the continental U.S. could be harmful to citizens' psychological well-being, as well as the environment as it may lead to mass spraying of insecticides that may not be effective in controlling the mosquitos. [More]
Prenatal exposure to SSRIs linked to lower birth weight, gestational length

Prenatal exposure to SSRIs linked to lower birth weight, gestational length

A new study, published today in the International Journal of Epidemiology, has found that prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has a significant association with lower birth weight and gestational length. [More]
New research solves mystery of why cetuximab drug proved futile for many colorectal cancer patients

New research solves mystery of why cetuximab drug proved futile for many colorectal cancer patients

Cancer researchers have identified a marker that shows up in a blood test that determines which patients with colorectal cancer that has spread would benefit from receiving the drug cetuximab. [More]
'Weekend effect’ may contribute to worsening availability of donor kidneys in the U.S

'Weekend effect’ may contribute to worsening availability of donor kidneys in the U.S

Investigators have uncovered a "weekend effect" contributing to the worsening availability of donor kidneys in the United States. They found that kidneys that would normally be made available for transplantation were less likely to be procured from donors over the weekend (89.5% on the weekend vs. 90.2% during the week). [More]
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