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Cardiologist Emelia Benjamin receives AHA 2016 Gold Heart Award

Cardiologist Emelia Benjamin receives AHA 2016 Gold Heart Award

Emelia J. Benjamin, MD, ScM, FACC, FAHA, professor of medicine in the section of cardiovascular medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, is the recipient of the American Heart Association's 2016 Gold Heart Award. [More]
Study compares efficacy of SDF in arresting root caries in elders from different fluoridated areas

Study compares efficacy of SDF in arresting root caries in elders from different fluoridated areas

On June 24, 2016, at the 94th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research, researcher Edward Lo, University of Hong Kong, SAR, China, will present a study titled "Effectiveness of SDF in Arresting Root Caries in Different Fluoridated Areas." [More]
Investigators evaluate history of gingival inflammation during first, second trimester of pregnancy

Investigators evaluate history of gingival inflammation during first, second trimester of pregnancy

Today at the 94th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research, researcher Michael Reddy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA, will present a study titled "Gingivitis During the First/Second Trimesters of Pregnancy." [More]
Overweight and obesity increase risk for periodontitis

Overweight and obesity increase risk for periodontitis

Today at the 94th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research, researcher Marco Peres, The University of Adelaide, South Australia, will present a study titled "Overweight and Obesity Impact on Periodontitis: A Brazilian Birth Cohort." [More]
University of Miami researchers awarded new contracts to detect genetic factors linked to Alzheimer's disease risk

University of Miami researchers awarded new contracts to detect genetic factors linked to Alzheimer's disease risk

Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly and occurs in all ethnic and racial groups. It affects more than 5 million people age 65 and older in the United States alone and there is currently no effective treatment or cure. [More]
KARMA study confirms resistance to anti-malarial drugs confined to Southeast Asia

KARMA study confirms resistance to anti-malarial drugs confined to Southeast Asia

The first global mapping of artemisinin resistance has definitively confirmed that resistance to the main drug currently used in the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria is for the moment confined to Southeast Asia and has not spread to sub-Saharan Africa. [More]
Latest online version of German Diabetes Risk Score optimized for mobile devices

Latest online version of German Diabetes Risk Score optimized for mobile devices

The German Institute of Human Nutrition has updated the online version of its German Diabetes Risk Score and has optimized it for mobile devices. [More]
Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Nonmedical use of prescription opioids more than doubled among adults in the United States from 2001-2002 to 2012-2013, based on a study from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health. Nearly 10 million Americans, or 4.1 percent of the adult population, used opioid medications in 2012-2013 a class of drugs that includes OxyContin and Vicodin, without a prescription or not as prescribed (in greater amounts, more often, or longer than prescribed) in the past year. [More]
Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines on diet and physical activity may reduce disease incidence

Adherence to cancer prevention guidelines on diet and physical activity may reduce disease incidence

"Behaviors such as poor diet choices, physical inactivity, excess alcohol consumption and unhealthy body weight could account for more than 20 percent of cancer cases, and could, therefore, be prevented with lifestyle modifications," Kohler said, adding that when tobacco exposure is considered, these modifiable issues are believed to be factors in two-thirds of U.S. cancer deaths. [More]
Diabetes increases risk of dying from heart attack by 50%

Diabetes increases risk of dying from heart attack by 50%

Having diabetes increases the risk of dying from the effects of a heart attack by around 50 per cent, according to a widespread study. [More]
New study reveals increasing trend in Parkinson's disease over 30 years

New study reveals increasing trend in Parkinson's disease over 30 years

The incidence of Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism increased significantly in 30 years from 1976 to 2005, Mayo Clinic researchers reported today in a study in JAMA Neurology. [More]
Telephone counseling can help make cancer genetic services more accessible to rural women

Telephone counseling can help make cancer genetic services more accessible to rural women

Ever since Angelina Jolie used cancer genetic counseling and testing to learn about her risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, many other women have chosen to do the same. [More]
University education linked to higher risk of brain tumor

University education linked to higher risk of brain tumor

Men and women with a university degree are more prone to developing a brain tumor than people who do not take up higher education, according to an observational study published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. [More]
Maternal hypothyroxinemia may contribute to increased risk of schizophrenia in infants

Maternal hypothyroxinemia may contribute to increased risk of schizophrenia in infants

A study published in Biological Psychiatry reveals a new link between low levels of the thyroid hormone thyroxine during pregnancy and risk of schizophrenia in the offspring. [More]
Benign brain tumors less likely to emerge in people with high blood sugar

Benign brain tumors less likely to emerge in people with high blood sugar

In a surprising twist, benign brain tumors that have previously been tied to obesity and diabetes are less likely to emerge in those with high blood sugar, new research has found. [More]
Study shows for-profit hospices have persistently high rates of hospitalization

Study shows for-profit hospices have persistently high rates of hospitalization

Patients who were asked where they wanted to die upon entering hospice had lower rates of hospitalization at the end of life, as did those in hospices that monitored symptoms more frequently, according to a new study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
WHO convenes Emergency Committee's 3rd meeting to discuss on Zika virus and associated complications

WHO convenes Emergency Committee's 3rd meeting to discuss on Zika virus and associated complications

On 14 June 2016, the World Health Organization will convene the 3rd meeting of the Emergency Committee under the International Health Regulations (2005) (IHR) on Zika and observed increase in neurological disorders and neonatal malformations. [More]
Very hot drinks probably cause cancer, warns WHO

Very hot drinks probably cause cancer, warns WHO

The cancer agency of the World Health Organization says drinking very hot beverages is probably associated with esophageal cancer. [More]
Neck device can protect sportsmen from devastating effects of head  injuries

Neck device can protect sportsmen from devastating effects of head  injuries

Two new studies involving high school football and hockey players indicate wearing a specifically designed compression collar around the neck may prevent or reduce the devastating effects of head collisions in sports. [More]
Cranberries can reduce symptomatic UTIs and avoid chronic suppressive antibiotics

Cranberries can reduce symptomatic UTIs and avoid chronic suppressive antibiotics

Today leading experts on infectious disease and urinary tract infections (UTIs) will gather in London to discuss the alarming state of antibiotic resistance, and present findings from a landmark study that conclusively shows that cranberries can be a nutritional approach to reducing symptomatic UTIs, and as a result, may be a useful strategy to decrease worldwide use of antibiotics. [More]
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