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Researchers recommend early colorectal cancer screening guidelines for cervical cancer survivors

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston are the first to recommend that young women treated with radiation for cervical cancer should begin colorectal cancer screening earlier than traditionally recommended. [More]
Research sheds new light on the development of HPV-associated cancer

Research sheds new light on the development of HPV-associated cancer

It's long been known that certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause cancer. Now, researchers at The Ohio State University have determined a new way that HPV might spark cancer development - by disrupting the human DNA sequence with repeating loops when the virus is inserted into host-cell DNA as it replicates. [More]

Majority of women experience increased amount and duration of bleeding episodes, say researchers

Women going through menopause most likely think of it as the time for an end to predictable monthly periods. Researchers at the University of Michigan say it's normal, however, for the majority of them to experience an increase in the amount and duration of bleeding episodes, which may occur at various times throughout the menopausal transition. [More]
Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Community efforts boost people for HIV testing and reduce new infections

Communities in Africa and Thailand that worked together on HIV-prevention efforts saw not only a rise in HIV screening but a drop in new infections, according to a new study in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet Global Health. [More]
WHI study shows no significant link between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms

WHI study shows no significant link between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms

A new study from the Women's Health Initiative shows no significant connection between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms. The study was published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Feminine girls, masculine boys more likely to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks

Feminine girls, masculine boys more likely to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks

Young people who conform most strongly to norms of masculinity and femininity-the most "feminine" girls and the most "masculine" boys-are significantly more likely than their peers to engage in behaviors that pose cancer risks, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. [More]
Prenatal exposure to SSRIs linked with ASD and developmental delays in boys

Prenatal exposure to SSRIs linked with ASD and developmental delays in boys

In a study of nearly 1,000 mother-child pairs, researchers from the Bloomberg School of Public health found that prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a frequently prescribed treatment for depression, anxiety and other disorders, was associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and developmental delays (DD) in boys. [More]
Pitt CVR and Sanofi Pasteur join forces to help assess effectiveness of dengue vaccine

Pitt CVR and Sanofi Pasteur join forces to help assess effectiveness of dengue vaccine

The University of Pittsburgh Center for Vaccine Research (CVR) and Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, have entered a scientific collaboration to help assess the effectiveness of a dengue vaccine once introduced for immunization programs. [More]
Antibiotics improve growth in kids at risk of undernourishment in low income countries

Antibiotics improve growth in kids at risk of undernourishment in low income countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children at risk of undernourishment in low and middle income countries, according to researchers at McGill University who have just conducted a research literature review on the subject. [More]
New initiative aims to develop Global Psoriasis Atlas

New initiative aims to develop Global Psoriasis Atlas

While studies over the recent years have contributed to an improved understanding of psoriasis, there are still significant gaps in knowledge related to the epidemiology of this serious, chronic disease and trends in incidence over time. The World Health Organization, reported in 2013 that the worldwide prevalence of psoriasis is around 2%, but that studies in developed countries have declared prevalence rates of more than twice the global estimate at an average of 4.6% . [More]

Wake Forest Baptist professor offers tips to get back on exercise track

Committing to a workout regimen at the beginning of the year may have seemed like a good idea at the time, but four months in, most of us have already lost steam. According to Jamy Ard, M.D., associate professor of epidemiology and prevention, and co-director of the Weight Management Center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, that's because many of us set the bar too high. [More]

UK study finds link between low vitamin D status and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in British children

A UK study investigating the link between low vitamin D status and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in British children has identified a genetic variant associated with the disease's severity. [More]

Researcher receives $20,000 grant award from SHEA to determine Washington State Validation Protocol for CLABSIs

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) has announced Jason Lempp, MPH, CIC, as the winner of the third annual EPI Project Competition. Lempp was honored with the early investigator award for his project looking to determine if the Washington State Validation Protocol for central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) can be a scalable, sustainable model for tracking and ensuring quality national data on healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). [More]
Two Penn researchers selected as recipients of prestigious Clinical Research Achievement Award

Two Penn researchers selected as recipients of prestigious Clinical Research Achievement Award

Two researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Penn Cardiovascular Institute are among the 2014 recipients of the prestigious Clinical Research Achievement Award for their work in cardiovascular science. [More]
Multiple genomic data could help improve studies of association between genes and disease

Multiple genomic data could help improve studies of association between genes and disease

The difference between merely throwing around buzzwords like "personalized medicine" and "big data" and delivering on their medical promise is in the details of developing methods for analyzing and interpreting genomic data. In a pair of new papers, Brown University epidemiologist Yen-Tsung Huang and colleagues show how integrating different kinds of genomic data could improve studies of the association between genes and disease. [More]

Taking care of grandkids one day a week helps keep grandmothers mentally sharp, shows study

Taking care of grandkids one day a week helps keep grandmothers mentally sharp, finds a study from the Women's Healthy Aging Project study in Australia, published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). [More]
Expert guidance highlights strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections

Expert guidance highlights strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections

New expert guidance highlights strategies for implementing and prioritizing efforts to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) in hospitals. [More]
Hospital kitchens remain source of transmission for multi-drug resistant bacteria

Hospital kitchens remain source of transmission for multi-drug resistant bacteria

After handling raw poultry, hands of food preparers and cutting boards remain a source of transmission for multi-drug resistant bacteria, such as E. coli that produce extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs). [More]
Boston Scientific to launch of S-ICD System into parts of Asia

Boston Scientific to launch of S-ICD System into parts of Asia

Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) has expanded the launch of its S-ICD System into parts of Asia. The first implant of the S-ICD System in Asia was performed in Hong Kong by Prof. Hung Fat Tse, Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine, The University of Hong Kong and Department of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital in Pokfulam, Hong Kong, under the proctorship of Dr. Martin Stiles, Director of Electrophysiology, Waikato Hospital in Hamilton, New Zealand. [More]
Low-dose aspirin not significantly associated with pregnancy loss

Low-dose aspirin not significantly associated with pregnancy loss

The Effects of Aspirin in Gestation and Reproduction (EAGeR) medical trial has found that, in general, low-dose aspirin is not beneficial for future pregnancy outcomes in women with prior pregnancy loss. [More]