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Suicide mortality rate among people with epilepsy higher than general population, study shows

Suicide mortality rate among people with epilepsy higher than general population, study shows

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control studied the prevalence of suicide among people with epilepsy compared to the population overall and estimated that the annual suicide mortality rate among those with epilepsy was 22 percent higher than in the general population. Results are online in the journal Epilepsy and Behavior. [More]
Study finds no significant decline in indoor tanning use among school children after under-17 ban

Study finds no significant decline in indoor tanning use among school children after under-17 ban

Research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers School of Public Health shows no significant decline in indoor tanning rates among children under age 17 following a ban on such use in New Jersey enacted in 2013. [More]
JAIDS presents important information to prevent HIV epidemic among transgender individuals

JAIDS presents important information to prevent HIV epidemic among transgender individuals

Programs to reduce the high risk of HIV infection among transgender people are urgently needed—but efforts are hindered by a lack of accurate information on HIV prevalence, HIV incidence, and specific risk factors facing this key population. [More]
New HIV infections stagnating globally at 2.5 million per year, study reveals

New HIV infections stagnating globally at 2.5 million per year, study reveals

A major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 study, published today in The Lancet HIV journal, reveals that although deaths from HIV/AIDS have been steadily declining from a peak in 2005, 2.5 million people worldwide became newly infected with HIV in 2015, a number that hasn't changed substantially in the past 10 years. [More]
Eating more healthy fats may lower type 2 diabetes risk

Eating more healthy fats may lower type 2 diabetes risk

Eating more unsaturated fats, especially polyunsaturated fats, in place of either dietary carbohydrate or saturated fats lowers blood sugar levels and improves insulin resistance and secretion, according to a new meta-analysis of data from 102 randomised controlled feeding trials in adults. [More]
New method using electrical conductivity could be effective in measuring blood present in dry blood spots

New method using electrical conductivity could be effective in measuring blood present in dry blood spots

Researchers from The University of Texas at Arlington have demonstrated that electrical conductivity can be an effective means to precisely measure the amount of blood present in dry blood spot analysis, providing a new alternative to the current preferred approach of measuring sodium levels. [More]
Children born with CHD more likely to develop type 2 diabetes in adulthood

Children born with CHD more likely to develop type 2 diabetes in adulthood

Children born with heart disease have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after age 30, according to a new study. [More]
Research underscores need to improve mental health screening for adolescent cancer survivors

Research underscores need to improve mental health screening for adolescent cancer survivors

Most adolescent survivors of childhood cancer have no reported psychological symptoms, but an analysis led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital found that those who do often have multiple symptoms and distinct symptom profiles. [More]
Studies shed new light on why young women in South Africa experience high rates of HIV infection

Studies shed new light on why young women in South Africa experience high rates of HIV infection

Evidence by the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA) consortium of South African and North American researchers will be presented on July 18 at the International AIDS 2016 Conference in Durban, shedding new light on why young women in South Africa have high rates of HIV infection. [More]
Experts call on UN to implement four-part global action plan to increase access to effective antibiotics

Experts call on UN to implement four-part global action plan to increase access to effective antibiotics

Today some of the world's foremost experts on antibiotic resistance called on the United Nations General Assembly to decisively act to reduce the growing number of deaths due to limited access to effective antibiotics. [More]
Study finds significant increase in age-adjusted prevalence of sleep disorders among U.S. veterans

Study finds significant increase in age-adjusted prevalence of sleep disorders among U.S. veterans

A new study found a six-fold increase in the age-adjusted prevalence of any sleep disorder diagnosis over an 11-year period among U.S. veterans. [More]
Research highlights global burden of HIV and other infectious diseases among prisoners and detainees

Research highlights global burden of HIV and other infectious diseases among prisoners and detainees

Prisoners and detainees worldwide have higher burdens of HIV, viral hepatitis and tuberculosis than the communities from which they come, and the regular cycling of infected people in and out of incarceration is worsening the epidemics both inside and outside of prison, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
Study identifies specific characteristics that predispose women to different hot flashes, night sweat patterns

Study identifies specific characteristics that predispose women to different hot flashes, night sweat patterns

Most women will get hot flashes or night sweats at some point in life. However, when these symptoms occur and how long they last can vary dramatically among women. [More]
UNC professor identifies research priorities to address VTE in cancer patients

UNC professor identifies research priorities to address VTE in cancer patients

More than 20 percent of all blood clots in veins occur in cancer patients. These clots, also known as venous thromboembolism (VTE), pose serious threats for cancer patients. [More]
Preschoolers with early bedtime routines less likely to become obese teenagers

Preschoolers with early bedtime routines less likely to become obese teenagers

Preschoolers who are regularly tucked into bed by 8 p.m. are far less likely to become obese teenagers than young children who go to sleep later in the evening, new research has found. [More]
New diagnostic model may become cheaper and easier alternative to screen for NAFLD

New diagnostic model may become cheaper and easier alternative to screen for NAFLD

Researchers have developed a diagnostic model that is highly predictive of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]
Community-level ART coverage, male circumcision linked to decline in new male HIV infections in Uganda

Community-level ART coverage, male circumcision linked to decline in new male HIV infections in Uganda

Increasing the number of men who undergo circumcision and increasing the rates at which women with HIV are given antiretroviral therapy (ART) were associated with significant declines in the number of new male HIV infections in rural Ugandan communities, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Health research suggests. [More]
Policies restricting opioid prescriptions could harm pain patients, suggests review

Policies restricting opioid prescriptions could harm pain patients, suggests review

A recent review and analysis suggests that some policies restricting opioid prescriptions to curb overdose deaths could be harming those who need them the most: pain patients. [More]
VMS during menopause transition linked to sociodemographic, psychosocial factors

VMS during menopause transition linked to sociodemographic, psychosocial factors

More data analysis about hot flashes from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation has been published today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
Chinese city migrant children have lower obesity rates than kids from urban families

Chinese city migrant children have lower obesity rates than kids from urban families

Researchers at the University of Birmingham have found that the children of migrants to Chinese cities have lower rates of obesity than youngsters in more affluent established urban families. [More]
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