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Benefits of physical activity outweigh harmful effects of air pollution

Benefits of physical activity outweigh harmful effects of air pollution

New research from the University of Copenhagen has found that the beneficial effects of exercise are more important for our health than the negative effects of air pollution, in relation to the risk of premature mortality. In other words, benefits of exercise outweigh the harmful effects of air pollution. [More]
Queen's University Belfast, NCI partners to provide 4 year PhD programme in Precision Cancer Medicine

Queen's University Belfast, NCI partners to provide 4 year PhD programme in Precision Cancer Medicine

Queen's University Belfast is leading a major new international initiative into modern cancer care medicine which was announced today in Washington D.C. [More]
Researchers evaluate decision aids for patient's choice of localised prostate cancer treatment

Researchers evaluate decision aids for patient's choice of localised prostate cancer treatment

Doctors strive to make treatment decisions together with their patients - but is the decision really shared? According to adjunct professor Kari Tikkinen, shared decision-making isn't easy, and clinicians need help. The international research group led by Tikkinen has studied the decision aids for treatment choice of localised prostate cancer [More]
Study quantifies long-term effects of nutrition deprivation at different stages of pregnancy

Study quantifies long-term effects of nutrition deprivation at different stages of pregnancy

A study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and colleagues in the Netherlands evaluated the relationship between nutritional conditions in very early life and adult health, and found that famine exposure during the first pregnancy trimester was associated with increases in mortality from a variety of causes other than cancer or cardiovascular disease. [More]
New study estimates UK hospital costs of hip fracture

New study estimates UK hospital costs of hip fracture

A new study presented today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases reveals the high cost of first and subsequent hip fractures to the healthcare system in the UK. [More]
Many parents underestimate children's weight, finds new study

Many parents underestimate children's weight, finds new study

Parents of obese children may not be able to recognise that their child is overweight unless they are at very extreme levels of obesity, according to research led by London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and UCL Institute of Child Health, research partner of Great Ormond Street Hospital. [More]
Top experts focus on musculoskeletal disorders in open key Congress in Milan

Top experts focus on musculoskeletal disorders in open key Congress in Milan

Musculoskeletal conditions, which affect over 1.7 billion people worldwide, will be the focus of a major four-day Congress which opens today in Milan, Italy. [More]
Study finds C. difficile infection increases hospital readmission rates

Study finds C. difficile infection increases hospital readmission rates

Patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) are twice as likely to be readmitted to the hospital as patients without the deadly diarrheal infection, according to a study published in the April issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
Roseroot extract may be beneficial for treating major depressive disorder

Roseroot extract may be beneficial for treating major depressive disorder

Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea), or roseroot, may be a beneficial treatment option for major depressive disorder (MDD), according to results of a study in the journal Phytomedicine led by Jun J. Mao, MD, MSCE, associate professor of Family Medicine, Community Health and Epidemiology and colleagues at the Perelman School of Medicine of University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Veterans with PTSD at higher risk of developing heart failure

Veterans with PTSD at higher risk of developing heart failure

In a study of more than 8,000 veterans living in Hawaii and the Pacific Islands, those with posttraumatic stress disorder had a nearly 50 percent greater risk of developing heart failure over about a seven-year follow-up period, compared with their non-PTSD peers. [More]

Ebola more likely to be fatal for young children

Ebola progresses more quickly and is more likely to be fatal for children under five, according to new research. An international group of scientists led by Imperial College London and the World Health Organization analysed data on Ebola cases in children under 16 during the current outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, comparing them to cases in adults. [More]
Mayo Clinic Center for Tuberculosis introduces new medical journal

Mayo Clinic Center for Tuberculosis introduces new medical journal

The Mayo Clinic Center for Tuberculosis, a regional training and consultation center at Mayo Clinic's campus in Rochester, Minn, is today launching a new medical journal, the Journal of Clinical Tuberculosis and Other Mycobacterial Diseases. [More]
Cancer-specific mortality lower in Asian Americans than non-Hispanic whites, shows study

Cancer-specific mortality lower in Asian Americans than non-Hispanic whites, shows study

Numerous studies have documented racial differences in deaths from cancer among non-Hispanic whites and African Americans, but little has been known about survival outcomes for Asian Americans who have been diagnosed with cancer, until now. [More]
Researchers use genetic information to track the fatal spread of multidrug-resistant TB

Researchers use genetic information to track the fatal spread of multidrug-resistant TB

Scientists have for the first time used DNA sequencing to trace the fatal spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis between patients in the UK. [More]
Birmingham academics educate Chinese grandparents to tackle childhood obesity

Birmingham academics educate Chinese grandparents to tackle childhood obesity

Academics from the University of Birmingham, UK are engaging with grandparents in China, to help tackle the increasing problem of obesity amongst Chinese children in a trailblazing public health programme. [More]
Scientists use DNA sequencing to trace the spread of drug-resistant TB

Scientists use DNA sequencing to trace the spread of drug-resistant TB

Scientists have for the first time used DNA sequencing to trace the fatal spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis between patients in the UK. [More]
EHT expert paper raises important and unanswered questions about safety of wearable tech

EHT expert paper raises important and unanswered questions about safety of wearable tech

Wearable technology is raising health concerns worldwide. A recent New York Times article by Nick Bilton is raising important and unanswered questions about the safety of wearable tech, according to the non-profit research group, Environmental Health Trust. [More]
Researchers examine use of natural experiments to evaluate obesity-related outcomes

Researchers examine use of natural experiments to evaluate obesity-related outcomes

Banning sodas from school vending machines, building walking paths and playgrounds, adding supermarkets to food deserts and requiring nutritional labels on restaurant menus: Such changes to the environments where people live and work are among the growing number of solutions that have been proposed and attempted in efforts to stem the rising obesity epidemic with viable, population-based solutions. [More]
Bloomberg Philanthropies introduces $100 million initiative to improve public health data collection

Bloomberg Philanthropies introduces $100 million initiative to improve public health data collection

Bloomberg Philanthropies, in partnership with the Australian government, is launching Data for Health, a $100 million initiative that will enable 20 low- and middle-income countries to vastly improve public health data collection. [More]
How our DNA may prevent bowel cancer

How our DNA may prevent bowel cancer

The link between taking aspirin, and similar medications called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (or NSAIDS), and bowel (colorectal) cancer prevention is well established. [More]
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