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Clonal hematopoiesis may help predict cancer patients at risk for fatal form of leukemia

Clonal hematopoiesis may help predict cancer patients at risk for fatal form of leukemia

Patients successfully treated for breast, colon and other cancers can go on to develop an often-fatal form of leukemia, sometimes years after completion of treatment, due to a genetic mutation leading to secondary malignancies known as therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MNs). [More]
ACS approves $1.7 million funding for new research grants to Yale University

ACS approves $1.7 million funding for new research grants to Yale University

The American Cancer Society, the largest non-government, not-for-profit funding source of cancer research in the United States, has approved funding for three new research grants totaling over $1.7 million to investigators at Yale University. [More]
Report reveals hospitalization, mortality rates for kidney disease patients continue to decrease in the U.S.

Report reveals hospitalization, mortality rates for kidney disease patients continue to decrease in the U.S.

According to an annual data report from the United States Renal Data System, hospitalization and mortality rates for patients with chronic kidney disease continue to decline in the U.S. [More]
Menopausal women may experience accelerated decline in lung function, research shows

Menopausal women may experience accelerated decline in lung function, research shows

Menopausal women appear to experience an accelerated decline in lung function, according to new research published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Simple exercise program improves walking performance and quality of life in dialysis patients

Simple exercise program improves walking performance and quality of life in dialysis patients

In a recent study, a simple exercise program carried out at home improved dialysis patients' walking performance and quality of life. The findings appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
Study finds no changes in overall rates of suicide attempts and patterns

Study finds no changes in overall rates of suicide attempts and patterns

Johns Hopkins investigators report that their analysis of a national database representing more than 1 billion emergency department visits shows that over a recent eight-year period, nothing much has changed in the rates of unsuccessful suicide attempts, or in the age, gender, seasonal timing or means used by those who tried to take their lives in the United States. [More]
Alcohol consumption linked to higher risk of melanoma

Alcohol consumption linked to higher risk of melanoma

Alcohol intake was associated with higher rates of invasive melanoma among white men and women. [More]
Study highlights need to increase handwashing compliance among child care workers

Study highlights need to increase handwashing compliance among child care workers

Child care personnel properly clean their hands less than a quarter of the times they are supposed to, according to a study published in the December issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
Problems linked to gait can predict decline in memory and thinking

Problems linked to gait can predict decline in memory and thinking

Walking is a milestone in development for toddlers, but it's actually only one part of the complex cognitive task known as gait that includes everything from a person's stride length to the accompanying swing of each arm. [More]
Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans with epilepsy have higher mortality risk, study reveals

Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans with epilepsy have higher mortality risk, study reveals

U.S. Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans (IAVs) with epilepsy were more than twice as likely to die between 2011 and 2015 as were similar veterans without epilepsy. A study published Nov. 11 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report revealed that IAVs were found to have a higher prevalence of mental and physical comorbidity and to have substantially higher mortality than were veterans without epilepsy. [More]
Electro-acupuncture may be effective in treating sleep disturbances in women with breast cancer

Electro-acupuncture may be effective in treating sleep disturbances in women with breast cancer

It's somewhat of a little-known adverse effect of having breast cancer, but studies suggest that approximately 30% to 40% of women with breast cancer report persistent hot flashes. Nocturnal hot flashes are among the most problematic because they can contribute to poor sleep. [More]
Scientists take one step forward by finding how antibody neutralizes Zika infection

Scientists take one step forward by finding how antibody neutralizes Zika infection

As Zika spreads throughout the world, the call for rapid development of therapeutics to treat Zika rings loud and clear. [More]
Vitamin D supplements do not prevent disease in the majority, says study

Vitamin D supplements do not prevent disease in the majority, says study

Current evidence does not support that vitamin D supplementation does anything to help prevent disease among the majority of people, according to a new study published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ). [More]
Study finds upward trend in stroke rates among younger generations

Study finds upward trend in stroke rates among younger generations

Older baby boomers—those born between 1945 and 1954—can proudly boast a new label: the "stroke-healthiest generation," according to a Rutgers study that found the lowest incidence of ischemic stroke in this age group within the past 20 years. [More]
Improved surveillance systems and coherent policies needed to combat Rift Valley fever

Improved surveillance systems and coherent policies needed to combat Rift Valley fever

Research on the mosquito-borne Rift Valley fever in east Africa and the Arabian Peninsula shows that current surveillance systems are unable to detect the virus in livestock before it spreads to humans. [More]
Measles can spread more quickly in schools than previously thought

Measles can spread more quickly in schools than previously thought

Measles, one of the world's most contagious diseases, can spread more quickly in schools than previously thought, according to Princeton University-led research. [More]
Study shows widespread underdiagnosis of hypertension and prehypertension in U.S. children

Study shows widespread underdiagnosis of hypertension and prehypertension in U.S. children

Hypertension and prehypertension in children often go undiagnosed, according to a new study published today in Pediatrics. [More]
Newborn telemedicine consultations can positively impact patient care, study shows

Newborn telemedicine consultations can positively impact patient care, study shows

Approximately 10 percent of newborns require help breathing after birth, and 1 in 1,000 newborns require more intensive resuscitation measures. [More]
ESCMID experts raise awareness for optimal use of antibiotics to combat AMR

ESCMID experts raise awareness for optimal use of antibiotics to combat AMR

Experts at the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease (ESCMID) are joining colleagues across the globe this week to promote prudent use of antibiotics. [More]
New public-private partnership launches major health effort to reduce cancer in San Francisco

New public-private partnership launches major health effort to reduce cancer in San Francisco

Cancer is the leading cause of death in San Francisco and costs patients, families and taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars each year. [More]
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