Epidemiology News and Research RSS Feed - Epidemiology News and Research

AHA selects UAB to take part in $15 million study on high blood pressure

AHA selects UAB to take part in $15 million study on high blood pressure

The University of Alabama at Birmingham is one of four institutions selected to study high blood pressure as part of the American Heart Association's new Strategically Focused Research Network on hypertension. [More]
Children who experience multiple traumatic events face risk of being hypertensive adults

Children who experience multiple traumatic events face risk of being hypertensive adults

Children who experience multiple traumatic events, from emotional and sexual abuse to neglect, have higher blood pressures as young adults than their peers, researchers report. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers link sperm with specific 'epigenetic tags' to autism

Johns Hopkins researchers link sperm with specific 'epigenetic tags' to autism

In a small study, Johns Hopkins researchers found that DNA from the sperm of men whose children had early signs of autism shows distinct patterns of regulatory tags that could contribute to the condition. A detailed report of their findings will be published online in the International Journal of Epidemiology on April 15. [More]
Scientists find link between higher muscle mass and healthier bone development in children

Scientists find link between higher muscle mass and healthier bone development in children

Scientists at the University of Southampton have shown that higher muscle mass is strongly linked with healthier bone development in children. [More]
Experts to make roadmap for future research, clinical trials for SCLC patients at IASLC workshop

Experts to make roadmap for future research, clinical trials for SCLC patients at IASLC workshop

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) will be the concentrated focus when 100 global experts in the field meet for a workshop hosted by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer on April 22-24, 2015 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. [More]
Infectious diseases experts release new guidance to avoid infections during hospital visits

Infectious diseases experts release new guidance to avoid infections during hospital visits

Leading infectious diseases experts have released new guidance for healthcare facilities looking to establish precautions for visitors of patients with infectious diseases. The guidance looks to reduce the potential for healthcare visitors in spreading dangerous bacteria within the healthcare facility and community. [More]
Being underweight in middle age associated with increased dementia risk

Being underweight in middle age associated with increased dementia risk

Middle-aged people who are underweight (with a Body Mass Index [BMI] less than 20 kg/m2) are a third more likely to develop dementia than people of similar age with a healthy BMI, according to new research published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal. [More]
Computer model provides policy prescription to optimize early HIV treatment

Computer model provides policy prescription to optimize early HIV treatment

When a whole country's public health is at stake, making the wrong policy choices can cost lives and money. That's why researchers have worked to develop computer simulations of epidemics that can model individual behaviors and interactions to predict the spread of disease and the efficacy of interventions. [More]
People with high-risk tumors containing BRAF or NRAS gene mutations have lower survival rates

People with high-risk tumors containing BRAF or NRAS gene mutations have lower survival rates

Researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center analyzed hundreds of melanoma samples to find out if two genetic mutations more commonly found in melanoma tumors were associated with lower survival rates in patients. [More]
Pediatric melanoma incidence rates decrease from 2004-2010

Pediatric melanoma incidence rates decrease from 2004-2010

Melanoma is an aggressive form of skin cancer that has been increasing in incidence in adults over the past 40 years. Although pediatric melanoma is rare (5-6 children per million), most studies indicate that incidence has been increasing. In a new study scheduled for publication in The Journal of Pediatrics, researchers found that the incidence of pediatric melanoma in the United States actually has decreased from 2004-2010. [More]
Arts and craft activities, computer use may stave off memory problems

Arts and craft activities, computer use may stave off memory problems

People who participate in arts and craft activities and who socialize in middle and old age may delay the development in very old age of the thinking and memory problems that often lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the April 8, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Exercise benefits obese, overweight people with NAFLD

Exercise benefits obese, overweight people with NAFLD

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the western world. A new study published in the Journal of Hepatology shows that exercise, regardless of frequency or intensity, benefits obese and overweight adults with NAFLD. [More]
Study estimates prevalence of treatment-related chronic diseases among childhood cancer survivors

Study estimates prevalence of treatment-related chronic diseases among childhood cancer survivors

The number of childhood cancer survivors in the U.S. has increased, but the majority of those who have survived five or more years after diagnosis face chronic health problems related to their treatment, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. [More]
Many women diagnosed with breast cancer concerned about genetic risk of developing other cancers

Many women diagnosed with breast cancer concerned about genetic risk of developing other cancers

A new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center finds that many women diagnosed with breast cancer are concerned about the genetic risk of developing other cancers themselves or of a loved one developing cancer. [More]
Researchers identify 22 genetic variations associated with increased risk of prostate cancer

Researchers identify 22 genetic variations associated with increased risk of prostate cancer

Prostate cancer affects one out of every 6 men during their lifetime and is the second most common cause of cancer-related death for men in the United States, resulting in an estimated 27,500 deaths in 2015. Identifying those men who have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer may reduce mortality. [More]
New data underscore global threats posed by unsafe foods

New data underscore global threats posed by unsafe foods

New data on the harm caused by foodborne illnesses underscore the global threats posed by unsafe foods, and the need for coordinated, cross-border action across the entire food supply chain, according to WHO, which next week is dedicating its annual World Health Day to the issue of food safety. [More]
Cardiovascular deaths continue to rise globally despite gains in prevention, treatment

Cardiovascular deaths continue to rise globally despite gains in prevention, treatment

As the global population pushes past 7 billion and more people reach old age, the number of deaths from cardiovascular diseases is on the rise. Cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of premature death in the world, include heart attacks, strokes, and other circulatory diseases. [More]
Study: Placenta can be used to measure arsenic exposure in pregnant women, fetuses

Study: Placenta can be used to measure arsenic exposure in pregnant women, fetuses

The placenta can be used to reliably measure arsenic exposure in pregnant women and how much of the toxic metal is transferred to their fetuses, a Dartmouth College study shows. [More]
Increasing Social Security retirement age could bridge income gap

Increasing Social Security retirement age could bridge income gap

The age to receive full Social Security benefits should be closer to 70, according to a report published in the journal Daedalus. [More]
Case Western Reserve researchers explore ways to treat, cure TB

Case Western Reserve researchers explore ways to treat, cure TB

After discovering a unique group of people resistant to tuberculosis (TB) infection, Case Western Reserve researchers are leading an international team dedicated to understanding exactly how they fight off a disease that claims 1.5 million lives each year. [More]
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