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Bloodstream infections differ based on distance from the equator, health care spending

Bloodstream infections differ based on distance from the equator, health care spending

Where you live affects the type of bacteria that cause bloodstream infections, according to researchers at Rhode Island Hospital and an international team of investigators. The closer you live to the equator, the greater the likelihood of a bloodstream infection caused by a group of bacteria called Gram-negative bacteria, which thrive in warm and moist environments, compared to another group of bacteria referred to as Gram-positive bacteria. [More]
Kaiser Permanente study: Self-reported exercise lowers blood pressure, blood glucose levels

Kaiser Permanente study: Self-reported exercise lowers blood pressure, blood glucose levels

Self-reported moderate to vigorous exercise was associated with lower blood pressure and blood glucose levels in a Kaiser Permanente study published in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease. [More]
Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Maternal exposure to fine particulate air pollution contributes to autism risk

Women exposed to high levels of fine particulate matter specifically during pregnancy--particularly during the third trimester--may face up to twice the risk of having a child with autism than mothers living in areas with low particulate matter, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health. [More]
UC Davis study finds that firearm suicides on the rise among whites

UC Davis study finds that firearm suicides on the rise among whites

While the overall death rate from firearm violence has remained unchanged for more than a decade, the patterns for suicide and homicide have changed dramatically, a UC Davis study on the epidemiology of gun violence from 2003 to 2012 has found. [More]
Survey highlights need for increased public education on benefits of lung cancer screening in France

Survey highlights need for increased public education on benefits of lung cancer screening in France

A prospective nationwide survey on perceptions of lung cancer in the general population of France highlights a need for increased public education on the benefits of lung cancer screening, the good survival rates of early-stage disease and the improved outcomes with new therapeutic strategies, including targeted-therapies. [More]
UVA study finds that measurement of breast density better predicts woman's breast cancer risk

UVA study finds that measurement of breast density better predicts woman's breast cancer risk

A new study from UVA Cancer Center found that adding a measurement of breast density better predicts women's risk for breast cancer. Including breast density as part of risk models for breast cancer could support the development of a personalized risk model to recommend how often a woman should have a mammogram based on her unique risk factors. [More]
Study shows numeracy linked to bowel cancer screening

Study shows numeracy linked to bowel cancer screening

PEOPLE who have problems with numbers may be more likely to feel negative about bowel cancer screening, including fearing an abnormal result, while some think the test is disgusting or embarrassing, according to a Cancer Research UK supported study published today (Monday) in the Journal of Health Psychology. [More]
Sensitive toxicity test aims to detect dangerous side effects in pharmaceutical development

Sensitive toxicity test aims to detect dangerous side effects in pharmaceutical development

Because of undetected toxicity problems, about a third of prescription drugs approved in the U.S. are withdrawn from the market or require added warning labels limiting their use. An exceptionally sensitive toxicity test invented at the University of Utah could make it possible to uncover more of these dangerous side effects early in pharmaceutical development so that fewer patients are given unsafe drugs. [More]
Novartis announces FDA approval of Signifor LAR for treatment of patients with acromegaly

Novartis announces FDA approval of Signifor LAR for treatment of patients with acromegaly

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Signifor long-acting release (LAR) (pasireotide) for injectable suspension, for intramuscular use, for the treatment of patients with acromegaly who have had an inadequate response to surgery and/or for whom surgery is not an option. [More]
Many college students regard hookah smoking safer than smoking cigarettes

Many college students regard hookah smoking safer than smoking cigarettes

Despite emerging evidence otherwise, many college students consider hookah smoking safer than smoking cigarettes, reports a University of South Florida College of Public Health study published this month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Key steps to improve care for pregnant mothers and babies affected by CDH

Key steps to improve care for pregnant mothers and babies affected by CDH

A new study has revealed key steps for hospitals to improve care for pregnant mums and babies affected by a life-threatening condition. [More]

New report explores pros and cons of working with real world medical data

A new report by researchers at RTI Health Solutions and parent company RTI International, found that although healthcare databases have allowed for greater access to real world medical data, using databases to evaluate the safety of medical products is complex and requires careful research consideration. [More]
Higher human exposure to metal cadmium can lead to shorter telomeres

Higher human exposure to metal cadmium can lead to shorter telomeres

A new study led by a researcher at Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University looks at the metal cadmium and finds that higher human exposure can lead to significantly shorter telomeres, bits of DNA at the ends of chromosomes that are associated with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other diseases of old age. [More]
Use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer increases 17.4%, study finds

Use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer increases 17.4%, study finds

The use of hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (HF-WBI) for patients with early-stage breast cancer increased 17.4 percent from 2004 to 2011, and patients are more likely to receive HF-WBI compared to conventionally fractionated whole-breast irradiation (CF-WBI) when they are treated at an academic center or live ≥50 miles away from a cancer center, according to a study published in the December 1, 2014 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Cigarette smoking continues to cause nearly three in ten cancer deaths in the U.S.

Cigarette smoking continues to cause nearly three in ten cancer deaths in the U.S.

A new American Cancer Society study finds that despite significant drops in smoking rates, cigarettes continue to cause about three in ten cancer deaths in the United States. The study, appearing in the Annals of Epidemiology, concludes that efforts to reduce smoking prevalence as rapidly as possible should be a top priority for the U.S. public health efforts to prevent cancer deaths. [More]
Doctors prescribe fewer opioids for pain as prescription drug abuse rises

Doctors prescribe fewer opioids for pain as prescription drug abuse rises

Nine in 10 primary care physicians say that prescription drug abuse is a moderate or big problem in their communities and nearly half say they are less likely to prescribe opioids to treat pain compared to a year ago, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Triple hormone reduces body weight, improves insulin sensitivity

Triple hormone reduces body weight, improves insulin sensitivity

Recently, the researchers had constructed several single molecules with dual hormone action. Now, for the first time, the researchers succeeded in designing a substance that combines three metabolically active hormone components (GLP-1, GIP and glucagon) and offers unmatched potency to fight metabolic diseases in pre-clinical trials. [More]
Simple rectal swab cultures can thwart drug-resistant E. coli in patients undergoing TRUSBx procedures

Simple rectal swab cultures can thwart drug-resistant E. coli in patients undergoing TRUSBx procedures

Some infections after prostate biopsy due to drug-resistant Escherichia coli can be thwarted by simple rectal swab cultures prior to the procedure. The cultures test for antibiotic-resistant E. coli, and the findings are used to direct the selection of antimicrobial prophylaxis used for the procedure, according to Rhode Island Hospital researchers. [More]
Most elderly women with early-stage breast cancer still receive radiation therapy despite less benefit

Most elderly women with early-stage breast cancer still receive radiation therapy despite less benefit

Women over the age of 70 who have certain early-stage breast cancers overwhelmingly receive radiation therapy despite published evidence that the treatment has limited benefit, researchers at Duke Medicine report. [More]
Researchers reveal that genetic mutations may cause more cases of ALS

Researchers reveal that genetic mutations may cause more cases of ALS

Genetic mutations may cause more cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) than scientists previously had realized, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. The scientists also showed that the number of mutated genes influences the age when the fatal paralyzing disorder first appears. [More]