Epidemiology News and Research RSS Feed - Epidemiology News and Research

Parents do not perceive need to vaccinate children against influenza, study finds

Parents do not perceive need to vaccinate children against influenza, study finds

Despite the fact that influenza leads to more hospitalizations and deaths among children than any other vaccine-preventable disease, parents frequently decline vaccinating their children against influenza because they don't perceive the need, according to a new case-control study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
Study finds increase in odds of prescription opioid use disorder among young adults

Study finds increase in odds of prescription opioid use disorder among young adults

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found there was an increase in the probability of having a prescription opioid use disorder in the past year among 18- to 34-year-old nonmedical prescription opioid users in 2014 compared to 2002. [More]
HPV vaccine can decrease incidence of cervical pre-cancers among young women, research shows

HPV vaccine can decrease incidence of cervical pre-cancers among young women, research shows

Every 20 minutes, someone in the United States receives a cancer diagnosis related to human papillomavirus. HPV causes cancer of the cervix, anus and throat. [More]
Study suggests ovary removal to prevent ovarian cancer should be discontinued in premenopausal women

Study suggests ovary removal to prevent ovarian cancer should be discontinued in premenopausal women

A Mayo Clinic research team has found evidence suggesting that the controversial practice of ovary removal in premenopausal women to prevent ovarian cancer should be discontinued in women who are not at high risk of cancer. [More]
Does exercise eliminate the ill effects of sitting? An interview with Prof. Ulf Ekelund

Does exercise eliminate the ill effects of sitting? An interview with Prof. Ulf Ekelund

In short, the detrimental effects of sitting for prolonged hours can be divided into acute, or short-term, and long-term effects. [More]
Dental fillings contribute to prolonged mercury levels in the body, research shows

Dental fillings contribute to prolonged mercury levels in the body, research shows

Dental surface restorations composed of dental amalgam, a mixture of mercury, silver, tin and other metals, significantly contribute to prolonged mercury levels in the body, according to new research from the University of Georgia's department of environmental health science in the College of Public Health. [More]

Sustained exposure to economic hardship linked to worse cognitive function in young individuals

Poverty and perceived hardship over decades among relatively young people in the U.S. are strongly associated with worse cognitive function and may be important contributors to premature aging among disadvantaged populations, report investigators in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. [More]
Increasing adoption of SBRT improves survival rates for older patients with early stage lung cancer

Increasing adoption of SBRT improves survival rates for older patients with early stage lung cancer

Survival rates for elderly patients who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) rose from roughly 40 to 60 percent over the past decade, concurrent with the increasing adoption of SBRT, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
New NCCN Guidelines outline diagnosis, treatment strategies for myeloproliferative neoplasms

New NCCN Guidelines outline diagnosis, treatment strategies for myeloproliferative neoplasms

Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN) are a group of blood cancers characterized by significant symptoms and a high risk of transformation into acute leukemia. [More]
Unknown exposure to second-hand smoke linked to increased mortality in non-smokers

Unknown exposure to second-hand smoke linked to increased mortality in non-smokers

A new biomarker has identified known and unknown exposure to second-hand smoke and confirmed a strong association to increased mortality in non-smokers, according to a new study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
New study reports both young men and women with ACS have good one-year prognosis

New study reports both young men and women with ACS have good one-year prognosis

It has become commonly accepted that women do worse than men following a heart attack or other coronary event. [More]
Maternal serum levels of nicotinamide linked to child’s risk of atopic eczema

Maternal serum levels of nicotinamide linked to child’s risk of atopic eczema

Infants whose mothers had a higher level of a particular type of vitamin B during pregnancy have a lower risk of eczema at age 12 months, new Southampton research has shown. [More]
Some people may have youthful DNA despite old age, study shows

Some people may have youthful DNA despite old age, study shows

The DNA of young people is regulated to express the right genes at the right time. With the passing of years, the regulation of the DNA gradually gets disrupted, which is an important cause of ageing. [More]
Ancient remedy to treat severe diarrhea becomes effective therapy for multiple recurrent CDI

Ancient remedy to treat severe diarrhea becomes effective therapy for multiple recurrent CDI

Modern medicine is taking a new look at an ancient remedy for severe diarrhea as a novel approach to treat a serious gastrointestinal infection. [More]
New Series on Maternal Health highlights future challenges, strategies to improve maternal wellbeing

New Series on Maternal Health highlights future challenges, strategies to improve maternal wellbeing

Each year, about 210 million women become pregnant and about 140 million newborn babies are delivered. While progress has been made in reducing maternal mortality globally, differences remain at international and national levels. The gap between the groups of countries with the lowest and highest rates of maternal mortality has doubled between 1990 and 2013. [More]
New global health strategy aims to eliminate HCV as global public health threat by 2030

New global health strategy aims to eliminate HCV as global public health threat by 2030

Chronic infection by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) proved fatal for over 700,000 people worldwide in 2013, mainly as a result of liver damage. Although information on the epidemiology of transmission and infection is sparse, recent estimates put the global prevalence of HCV infection at 130-150 million people. [More]
Study finds racial disparities in physical and functional quality of life for breast cancer survivors

Study finds racial disparities in physical and functional quality of life for breast cancer survivors

An analysis of the quality of life of several thousand breast cancer survivors in North Carolina found differences in how black and white women functioned and felt physically and spiritually during treatment and two years after diagnosis. [More]
Study shows clot-busting drug safe in treating people with wake-up stroke

Study shows clot-busting drug safe in treating people with wake-up stroke

Using a clot-busting medication to treat people who wake up with symptoms of stroke was safe and should be studied further to see how effective it might be for a population that otherwise has few treatment options, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Moderate to high levels of aerobic capacity could partially reduce risk of sudden cardiac death

Moderate to high levels of aerobic capacity could partially reduce risk of sudden cardiac death

UCA researchers, collaborating with the Exercise and Epidemiology Science and Biostatistics Departments from the University of South Carolina in Columbine, have carried out a study focused in knowing how important the aerobic capacity in the sudden death prevention is, paying special attention to those people who have some pathology such as obesity and hypertension. [More]
Benefits of cardioprotective drugs may extend beyond preventing acute coronary syndromes

Benefits of cardioprotective drugs may extend beyond preventing acute coronary syndromes

Medications prescribed to prevent heart attacks such as statins and aspirin are also associated with reduced heart attack severity, according to research published in PLOS ONE. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement