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Cockroach bait may be easier, cheaper way to manage key asthma trigger in children

Cockroach bait may be easier, cheaper way to manage key asthma trigger in children

It may be easier and cheaper for parents to manage a key asthma trigger in children -- exposure to cockroaches -- than previously thought, according to a new Tulane University study published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
Onset of hypertension later in life linked to lower dementia risk, study finds

Onset of hypertension later in life linked to lower dementia risk, study finds

New study results published online today in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association suggest that onset of high blood pressure later in life is associated with lower dementia risk after age 90, especially if hypertension is developed at age 80 or older. [More]
Drug-resistant deadly bacteria more widespread than previously thought, study finds

Drug-resistant deadly bacteria more widespread than previously thought, study finds

A family of highly drug-resistant and potentially deadly bacteria may be spreading more widely--and more stealthily -- than previously thought, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. [More]
New research finds link between heartburn drugs and increase in risk of infectious gastroenteritis

New research finds link between heartburn drugs and increase in risk of infectious gastroenteritis

New research has found a link between popular heartburn drugs and an increase in the risk of infectious gastroenteritis -- an illness that results in 13.1 million lost days of work in Australia a year. [More]
Folic acid supplements can reduce risk of having pregnancy affected by neural tube defects

Folic acid supplements can reduce risk of having pregnancy affected by neural tube defects

Despite the mandatory addition of folic acid to enriched grain products in the United States, many women still do not consume adequate amounts of this important vitamin, according to an editorial written by Laura E. Mitchell, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. [More]
Risk of skin cancer does not dissuade indoor tanning habits of college students, study shows

Risk of skin cancer does not dissuade indoor tanning habits of college students, study shows

White female college students in Indiana who tan indoors know they are placing themselves at risk of skin cancer and premature skin aging, but most continue to tan indoors anyway, according to a study conducted by researchers at the Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. [More]
Study may help clinicians predict outcome of common bariatric surgery

Study may help clinicians predict outcome of common bariatric surgery

New findings published online in The FASEB Journal, may one day help clinicians predict the outcome of roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. [More]
Researchers examine extent and severity of genitourinary injuries among U.S. service members

Researchers examine extent and severity of genitourinary injuries among U.S. service members

Because battlefield medical care has improved throughout the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, many more U.S. servicemen have survived what could have been fatal injuries in the past. [More]
Common viruses pose serious challenges in long-term care facilities

Common viruses pose serious challenges in long-term care facilities

A widespread outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) at a long-term dementia care ward infected 73 percent of patients, demonstrating the serious challenges in mitigating the spread of infectious diseases in such settings. [More]
Place of residence contributes to late-stage diagnosis of colorectal cancer, study finds

Place of residence contributes to late-stage diagnosis of colorectal cancer, study finds

In addition to a person's race or ethnicity, where they live can matter in terms of whether they are diagnosed at a late stage for colorectal cancer, according to a recent study led by a researcher at the School of Public Health at Georgia State University. [More]
Hospitals reduce bloodstream infections and healthcare costs with catheter safeguards, study shows

Hospitals reduce bloodstream infections and healthcare costs with catheter safeguards, study shows

U.S. hospitals are reducing bloodstream infections related to catheters by implementing rigorous safeguards that also save millions of healthcare dollars each year, according to research led by Cedars-Sinai. [More]
Regular aspirin use lowers pancreatic cancer risk by 50%, new study finds

Regular aspirin use lowers pancreatic cancer risk by 50%, new study finds

The regular use of aspirin lowers the risk for pancreatic cancer by almost 50 percent, a new study in China led by the Yale School of Public Health finds. [More]
New report proposes updated revisions to WIC for better adherence to Dietary Guidelines for Americans

New report proposes updated revisions to WIC for better adherence to Dietary Guidelines for Americans

A new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine proposes updated revisions to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children to better align with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and promote and support breast-feeding. [More]
New study from Veterans Health Administration finds significant decline in MRSA HAI rates

New study from Veterans Health Administration finds significant decline in MRSA HAI rates

The Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Health Administration's campaign to limit healthcare facility-associated infections (HAIs) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to make significant progress, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology . [More]
Current Chinese cesarean rate substantially lower than previously reported, new study finds

Current Chinese cesarean rate substantially lower than previously reported, new study finds

Overuse of cesarean can jeopardize the health of mothers and babies. As cesarean rates have grown in many nations, cesarean overuse has become a key public health issue. [More]
Genes influencing social communication skills linked to genes underlying  psychiatric disorders

Genes influencing social communication skills linked to genes underlying psychiatric disorders

The researchers studied the genetic overlap between the risk of having these psychiatric disorders and measures of social communicative competence - the ability to socially engage with other people successfully - during middle childhood to adolescence. [More]
Legalization of recreational marijuana changes teens' use and perceptions of marijuana

Legalization of recreational marijuana changes teens' use and perceptions of marijuana

Marijuana use significantly increased and its perceived harm decreased among eighth- and 10th-graders in Washington state following enactment of recreational marijuana laws, according to a UC Davis and Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health to be published online in JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
High BMI leads to epigenetic changes, study shows

High BMI leads to epigenetic changes, study shows

The extra pounds you gain during the holidays will not only show up on your hips but will also affect your DNA. [More]
Oncotype DX test can help guide treatment decisions and enable personalized care before breast cancer surgery

Oncotype DX test can help guide treatment decisions and enable personalized care before breast cancer surgery

New data presented at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) demonstrate that analyzing tumor biology with the Oncotype DX test can identify patients unlikely to benefit from chemotherapy prior to breast cancer surgery (neoadjuvant setting) and guide treatment decisions without compromising outcomes. [More]
Survey finds substantial use of CPM procedure among women with unilateral breast cancer

Survey finds substantial use of CPM procedure among women with unilateral breast cancer

In a survey of women who underwent treatment for early-stage breast cancer in one breast, contralateral prophylactic mastectomy use was substantial among patients without clinical indications but was low when patients reported that their surgeon recommended against it, according to a study published online by JAMA Surgery. [More]
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