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Researchers develop mouse model to improve basic research on Ebola treatments, vaccines

Researchers develop mouse model to improve basic research on Ebola treatments, vaccines

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and colleagues have developed the first genetic strain of mice that can be infected with Ebola and display symptoms similar to those that humans experience. [More]
UCSD researchers validate EEG test to study, treat schizophrenia

UCSD researchers validate EEG test to study, treat schizophrenia

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have validated an EEG test to study and treat schizophrenia. The findings, published in two separate studies, offer a clinical test that could be used to help diagnose persons at risk for developing mental illness later in life, as well as an approach for measuring the efficacies of different treatment options. [More]
Dietary linoleic acid lowers risk of coronary heart disease

Dietary linoleic acid lowers risk of coronary heart disease

People who swap 5% of the calories they consume from saturated fat sources such as red meat and butter with foods containing linoleic acid—the main polyunsaturated fat found in vegetable oil, nuts, and seeds—lowered their risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) events by 9% and their risk of death from CHD by 13%, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health researchers. [More]
Generic aromatase inhibitors increase breast cancer treatment adherence by 50%

Generic aromatase inhibitors increase breast cancer treatment adherence by 50%

Although oral hormonal therapy is known to substantially reduce breast cancer recurrence in women with hormone receptor-positive tumors, about one-half of patients fail to take their medications as directed. A new study by Columbia University Medical Center researchers has found that the introduction of generic aromatase inhibitors (the most common type of hormone therapy), which are considerably less expensive than their brand name counterparts, increased treatment adherence by 50 percent. [More]
Lowering 'bad' cholesterol may help prevent aortic valve disease, study finds

Lowering 'bad' cholesterol may help prevent aortic valve disease, study finds

An international research team led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre and Lund University has provided new evidence that aortic valve disease may be preventable. [More]
Working under hot sun causes health problems for sugarcane harvesters

Working under hot sun causes health problems for sugarcane harvesters

Hard work under hot sun causes health problems for sugar cane workers in Costa Rica, such as headache, nausea, and renal dysfunction. The presence of symptoms is also expected to increase in line with ongoing climate changes, according to a dissertation from Umeå University. [More]
Johns Hopkins to lead, design interactive Web-based Ebola training program

Johns Hopkins to lead, design interactive Web-based Ebola training program

Johns Hopkins Medicine has been tasked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to lead a group and to design an interactive Web-based learning program that guides health care workers, nurses and physicians through government-approved protocols to aid clinicians as they provide care to patients who may be at risk of contracting the Ebola virus. [More]
Financial burden higher in patients treated for colorectal cancer

Financial burden higher in patients treated for colorectal cancer

Nearly two-thirds of patients treated for colorectal cancer reported some measure of financial burden due to their treatment, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. [More]
Rates of type 1 diabetes increase significantly among non-Hispanic white youth

Rates of type 1 diabetes increase significantly among non-Hispanic white youth

The rate of non-Hispanic white youth diagnosed with type 1 diabetes increased significantly from 2002 to 2009 in all but the youngest age group of children, according to a new study published today in the journal Diabetes. [More]
High risk for congenital heart defects in Down syndrome provides tool to identify changes in genes

High risk for congenital heart defects in Down syndrome provides tool to identify changes in genes

Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality in humans, involving a third copy of all or part of chromosome 21. In addition to intellectual disability, individuals with Down syndrome have a high risk of congenital heart defects. However, not all people with Down syndrome have them – about half have structurally normal hearts. [More]
Mindfulness improves cardiovascular health

Mindfulness improves cardiovascular health

Pay attention to the implication of these new research results: People who pay more attention to their feelings and experiences tend to have better cardiovascular health. [More]
Research finds link between autism spectrum disorder and air toxics

Research finds link between autism spectrum disorder and air toxics

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were more likely to have been exposed to higher levels of certain air toxics during their mothers' pregnancies and the first two years of life compared to children without the condition, according to the preliminary findings of a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health investigation of children in southwestern Pennsylvania. [More]
Enhanced dental care reduces respiratory tract infection risk in ICU patients

Enhanced dental care reduces respiratory tract infection risk in ICU patients

New research shows vulnerable patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) who received enhanced oral care from a dentist were at significantly less risk for developing a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), like ventilator-associated pneumonia, during their stay. [More]
US hospitals lack infection prevention staff, resources to fight Ebola

US hospitals lack infection prevention staff, resources to fight Ebola

Only 6 percent of U.S. hospitals are well-prepared to receive a patient with the Ebola virus, according to a survey of infection prevention experts at U.S. hospitals conducted October 10-15 by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). [More]
Maternal nutrition before conception important to improve offspring’s health, say researchers

Maternal nutrition before conception important to improve offspring’s health, say researchers

Researchers from the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, believe the key to making future generations healthier could lie before the mother becomes pregnant. [More]
Researchers find frequency, severity of medication errors among young children

Researchers find frequency, severity of medication errors among young children

According to Nationwide Children's Hospital researchers, 63,000 children under the age of six experienced out-of-hospital medication errors annually between 2002 and 2012. One child is affected every eight minutes, usually by a well-meaning parent or caregiver unintentionally committing a medication error. [More]
Boston Scientific starts PLATINUM Diversity trial to evaluate Promus PREMIER Stent System

Boston Scientific starts PLATINUM Diversity trial to evaluate Promus PREMIER Stent System

As part of its commitment to innovation and improving patient outcomes, Boston Scientific Corporation has initiated the PLATINUM Diversity trial to evaluate the clinical performance of the Promus PREMIER Everolimus-Eluting Platinum Chromium Coronary Stent System in underserved patient populations, including women and people of color. [More]
Disruption of circadian rhythm linked to breast cancer, shows study

Disruption of circadian rhythm linked to breast cancer, shows study

The disruption of a person's circadian rhythm—their 24-hour biological clock—has been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer, according to new University of Georgia research. The culprit, in this study in particular, is artificial light. [More]
Ebola Virus and Public Health: A special feature by Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Ebola Virus and Public Health: A special feature by Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Accurate knowledge regarding Ebola is critical and pertinent for practicing physicians and clinicians given the current risk of hazardous global outbreak and epidemic. [More]
UWM study supports the hypothesis that links autism to air pollutants

UWM study supports the hypothesis that links autism to air pollutants

A researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee has added to a growing body of evidence that links autism to air pollutants such as those generated by cars and trucks. [More]