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Study shows impact of increasing number of opioid-related hospitalizations on health care costs

Study shows impact of increasing number of opioid-related hospitalizations on health care costs

Infection is a serious complication of intravenous drug abuse and a major cause of illness and death among intravenous drug users. As the national problem of opioid abuse, including of heroin, continues to grow, new research by clinicians at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and the VA Boston Healthcare System, published today in the May issue of the journal Health Affairs, offers new insights into the significant impact of the trend on opioid-related hospitalizations, infectious complications and health care costs. [More]
Incidence of cesarean delivery could be reduced by allowing women to labor longer

Incidence of cesarean delivery could be reduced by allowing women to labor longer

When women in labor are given more time to deliver their baby than current guidelines recommend, their incidence of cesarean delivery drops by 55 percent, say researchers at Thomas Jefferson University. [More]
Simulated practice in healthcare: an interview with Andy Anderson

Simulated practice in healthcare: an interview with Andy Anderson

There's around 95 to 100 simulation centres across the NHS in secondary care. These centres are used for a whole variety of training, practicing of skills and recreating incidents so that staff can prevent them recurring. [More]
New pain management strategies key to maximizing patient outcomes after TKR procedures

New pain management strategies key to maximizing patient outcomes after TKR procedures

According to a new literature review in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, a team-based care approach (consisting of the patient, family members, the orthopaedic surgeon and other medical practitioners) on total knee replacement (TKR) procedures, in conjunction with newer pain management strategies, is key to maximizing patient outcomes. [More]
Epidural analgesia has some adverse effects on newborns

Epidural analgesia has some adverse effects on newborns

Researchers from the University of Granada observed that babies born after epidural analgesia show a small decline in Apgar index values, a quick test applied to newborn babies in order to assess their general health. [More]
OSU researchers find no evidence that water births pose increased harm to newborns

OSU researchers find no evidence that water births pose increased harm to newborns

There is no evidence that water births, where a baby is intentionally born under water in a tub or pool, poses any increased harm to the child, Oregon State University researchers have found. [More]
Study: Spanish-speaking Hispanic women less likely to use neuraxial analgesia during labor

Study: Spanish-speaking Hispanic women less likely to use neuraxial analgesia during labor

Why do Hispanic women have reduced rates of epidural or spinal (neuraxial) analgesia during labor? Language barriers may be a key factor, according to a study in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
XARELTO reduces rates of major bleeding, recurrent blood clots in people with deep vein thrombosis

XARELTO reduces rates of major bleeding, recurrent blood clots in people with deep vein thrombosis

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, today announced the results from their real-world study XALIA showing that, in people with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), the rates of major bleeding and recurrent blood clots for XARELTO (rivaroxaban) in routine clinical practice were generally consistent with those observed in Phase 3 research. [More]
Magnesium sulfate has protective effect on maternal fever during labor

Magnesium sulfate has protective effect on maternal fever during labor

Women who received magnesium sulfate during labor were less likely to develop maternal fever, a condition that can lead to a variety of complications in newborns including difficulty breathing, seizures, cerebral palsy and a condition known as "floppy baby syndrome," characterized by inadequate muscle tone, according to a retrospective study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting in San Diego. [More]
ASA: Epidural or spinal anesthesia preferred for most cesarean deliveries

ASA: Epidural or spinal anesthesia preferred for most cesarean deliveries

New research could ease the minds of expectant mothers who may be nervous about epidurals or spinal anesthesia for childbirth. A study of New York state hospitals, published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, found the rate of anesthesia-related complications in women who received epidural or spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery decreased 25 percent over the past decade. [More]
Use of chest CT scans for hospital emergency-room patients with blunt trauma can be reduced: Study

Use of chest CT scans for hospital emergency-room patients with blunt trauma can be reduced: Study

Use of computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest for hospital emergency-room patients with blunt trauma could be reduced by more than one-third without compromising detection of major injury, concludes a new study led by a UC San Francisco physician. [More]
New research examines complications related to labor anesthesia in women with thrombocytopenia

New research examines complications related to labor anesthesia in women with thrombocytopenia

Can women with low platelet counts safely undergo epidural/spinal anesthesia during labor? Available evidence suggests a low rate of complications related to abnormal blood clotting for this large group of patients, reports a study in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
Janssen, Bayer HealthCare announce results from landmark studies evaluating safety profile of XARELTO in NVAF patients

Janssen, Bayer HealthCare announce results from landmark studies evaluating safety profile of XARELTO in NVAF patients

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, today announced results from PMSS (Post-Marketing Safety Surveillance) and XANTUS (XARELTO for Prevention of Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation), their landmark real-world studies evaluating the safety of XARELTO in people with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). [More]
Medical case report of woman with Channelopathy-associated Insensitivity to Pain Syndrome

Medical case report of woman with Channelopathy-associated Insensitivity to Pain Syndrome

The report, published on F1000Research and titled Neuropathic pain in a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain has just passed peer review. It concerns a unique case of a woman with Channelopathy-associated Insensitivity to Pain (CIP) Syndrome, who developed features of neuropathic pain after sustaining pelvic fractures and an epidural hematoma that impinged on the right fifth lumbar (L5) nerve root. These injuries were sustained during a painless labour, which culminated in a Caesarean section. [More]
New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

Five men with complete motor paralysis were able to voluntarily generate step-like movements thanks to a new strategy that non-invasively delivers electrical stimulation to their spinal cords, according to a new study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. The strategy, called transcutaneous stimulation, delivers electrical current to the spinal cord by way of electrodes strategically placed on the skin of the lower back. [More]
Scientists propose new spinal cord stimulation strategy to activate motor neurons

Scientists propose new spinal cord stimulation strategy to activate motor neurons

Patients, doctors and researchers look with great expectations to epidural electrostimulation, a medical technique that could alleviate the condition of subjects affected by paralysis due to spinal cord injury. Although still relatively rudimentary, the technique is constantly being improved thanks to research. [More]
Mild head injury patients having lower serum S100B levels unlikely to have intracranial hemorrhage

Mild head injury patients having lower serum S100B levels unlikely to have intracranial hemorrhage

Researchers conducted a prospective observational study in elderly patients and adult patients receiving antiplatelet therapy who presented with mild head injury at two trauma hospitals in Vienna: the Trauma Hospital Meidling and the Donauspital. [More]
Simple steps help accelerate recovery, reduce cost of care in people undergoing colorectal surgery

Simple steps help accelerate recovery, reduce cost of care in people undergoing colorectal surgery

Simple steps that include the consistent use of experienced medical teams for a single type of surgery, preemptive antibiotics before the procedure, less reliance on potent opioids during recovery and urging patients to get out of bed and move around sooner can not only prevent infections, blood clots and other serious complications in people undergoing colorectal operations, but can also accelerate recovery and reduce cost of care, according to results of an ongoing program at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. [More]
Neurosurgeon performs first endoscopic removal of spinal tumor at Rhode Island Hospital

Neurosurgeon performs first endoscopic removal of spinal tumor at Rhode Island Hospital

The spinal tumor grew back. Even though the 16-year old patient endured surgery a year earlier to remove and diagnose the lesion, it was back and its cause unknown. Determined to identify the tumor tissue and set the patient on an appropriate treatment regimen, Albert Telfeian, M.D., a neurosurgeon at Rhode Island Hospital and Hasbro Children's Hospital, performed the first reported case of extracting the tumor endoscopically while the patient was awake and under a local anesthetic. [More]
Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, today announced the initiation of CALLISTO, a new comprehensive clinical research program for their novel oral anticoagulant, rivaroxaban, in patients with active cancer. The studies are evaluating the medicine for the prevention and treatment of life-threatening blood clots in patients with a wide range of cancer types. [More]
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