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Inserm plays key role in developing European research

The French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) is currently the leading biomedical research organisation in Europe, and plays a key role in developing European research. To mark its 50th anniversary, Inserm wanted to assess the perceptions of Europeans regarding biomedical research. [More]

Study shows spinal stimulation therapy may have potential to change prognosis of people with paralysis

Four people with paraplegia are able to voluntarily move previously paralyzed muscles as a result of a novel therapy that involves electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health and the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation. [More]
Pradaxa receives FDA approval for treatment and reduction of risk of recurrence of DVT and PE

Pradaxa receives FDA approval for treatment and reduction of risk of recurrence of DVT and PE

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Pradaxa® (dabigatran etexilate mesylate) for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients who have been treated with a parenteral anticoagulant for five to 10 days, and to reduce the risk of recurrent DVT and PE in patients who have been previously treated. DVT and PE are collectively referred to as venous thromboembolism (VTE). [More]
Bristol-Myers Squibb, Pfizer announce FDA approval of Eliquis for DVT prophylaxis

Bristol-Myers Squibb, Pfizer announce FDA approval of Eliquis for DVT prophylaxis

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company and Pfizer Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a Supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for Eliquis (apixaban) for the prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which may lead to pulmonary embolism (PE), in patients who have undergone hip or knee replacement surgery. [More]
Women are most likely to experience serious pain following knee replacement than men

Women are most likely to experience serious pain following knee replacement than men

Middle-aged women with rheumatoid arthritis or arthritis resulting from an injury are among the patients most likely to experience serious pain following a knee replacement, researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York have found. [More]

Regional anesthesia may not make patients more prone to falls after knee replacement surgery

Two types of regional anesthesia do not make patients more prone to falls in the first days after having knee replacement surgery as some have previously suggested, according to a study based on nearly 200,000 patient records in the March issue of Anesthesiology. [More]
KKH doctors develop novel DIVA System for blood pressure management

KKH doctors develop novel DIVA System for blood pressure management

New trial results1 have shown that the world's first Double Intravenous Vasopressor Automated (DIVA) System affords superior control of maternal blood pressure in women undergoing caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia, when compared with manually-administered medication to manage reduced blood pressure (vasopressor). [More]

Patient controlled analgesia not equivalent to epidural analgesia for pain relief during labor

In a study to be presented on Feb. 7 at 1:30 p.m. CST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting-, in New Orleans, researchers will report findings which suggest remifentanil patient controlled analgesia is not equivalent to epidural analgesia for pain, pain appreciation scores, and overall satisfaction in women who request for pain relief during labor. [More]

Cantrell Drug Company amends FDA registration to include 503B compounding outsourcing facility

Cantrell Drug Company today announced amendment of its U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) registration to include the new 503B "compounding outsourcing facility" designation established under the recently passed Drug Quality and Security Act so that it can continue to serve patients nationwide with sterile medications that meet the most exacting quality standards. [More]

Gulf Coast Spine Care now offers new, improved treatment for degenerative disc disease

Degenerative disc disease affects many individuals, and it can cause a significant amount of pain to those affected. Its most common cause is related to aging and deterioration of the bones in the spine, and pain from the condition results when two or more vertebrae move and place pressure on the spine. This is a condition that often is associated with both a herniated disc and spinal stenosis. [More]

Perioperative analgesia may improve prostate cancer outcomes

Neuraxial analgesia added to general anesthesia for radical retropubic prostatectomy may lead to improved oncologic outcomes in prostate cancer, US researchers have found. [More]

Smiths Medical gets FDA clearance to market CADD-Solis system with PIB and PCA delivery in the US

Smiths Medical, a leading global medical device manufacturer, announced today it has received FDA 510(k) clearance to market its CADD-Solis pain management system version 3.0 with Programmed Intermittent Bolus and Patient Controlled Analgesics delivery in the United States. The new customizable, infusion system will help healthcare providers overcome challenges in maintaining effective epidural analgesia during labor and delivery or with post-operative pain management. [More]
Research examines link between opioid suppression of immune system and cancer recurrence

Research examines link between opioid suppression of immune system and cancer recurrence

​The methods used to anesthetize prostate cancer patients and control pain when their prostate glands are surgically removed for adenocarcinoma may affect their long-term cancer outcomes, a study led by Mayo Clinic has found. [More]
Research finds link between opioid-sparing technique and reduced progression of prostate cancer

Research finds link between opioid-sparing technique and reduced progression of prostate cancer

The methods used to anesthetize prostate cancer patients and control pain when their prostate glands are surgically removed for adenocarcinoma may affect their long-term cancer outcomes, a study led by Mayo Clinic has found. Opioids, painkillers commonly given during and after surgery, may suppress the immune system's ability to fight cancer cells. [More]
Vaginal delivery and early breast-feeding increase mothers' level of satisfaction

Vaginal delivery and early breast-feeding increase mothers' level of satisfaction

An article published in the journal Nutricion Hospitalaria reveals that the attitude of healthcare personnel, along with starting early breast-feeding, are another two factors that help in increasing the mothers' level of satisfaction [More]
St. Jude Medical evaluates effectiveness of PNfS and SCS for chronic low back and leg pain

St. Jude Medical evaluates effectiveness of PNfS and SCS for chronic low back and leg pain

St. Jude Medical, Inc., a global medical device company, has launched a clinical study to evaluate the combination of peripheral nerve field stimulation, and spinal cord stimulation, to determine whether the two therapies together offer more effective management of chronic low back and leg pain than SCS alone. The first patient in the SENSE Subcutaneous and Epidural Neuromodulation System Evaluation study was enrolled by Dr. Thomas Yearwood, an interventional pain physician at Comprehensive Pain & Rehabilitation in Pascagoula, Miss. [More]

Less-healthy patients more prone to recovery room complications

Complications in the recovery room decreased by 58 percent between 1990 and 2010, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2013 annual meeting. In a previous study completed in the late 1980s, recovery room complications occurred in 23.7 percent of the patients. [More]
Minimally invasive treatments for lumbar spinal stenosis: an interview with James Corbett, President & Chief Executive Officer of Vertos Medical

Minimally invasive treatments for lumbar spinal stenosis: an interview with James Corbett, President & Chief Executive Officer of Vertos Medical

Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a degenerative, age-related narrowing of the lower spinal canal that causes pressure on the nerves, leading to pain and reduced mobility. Symptoms include pain, numbness, or tingling in the lower back, legs, or buttocks, which limits your ability to stand or walk. [More]

Phase III EINSTEIN trial program: XARELTO reduces risk of DVT and PE

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today a newly published, pooled analysis of the Phase III EINSTEIN trial program, showing XARELTO (rivaroxaban) is as effective as the standard of care in reducing the risk of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in people with symptomatic DVT or PE, while reducing the incidence of major bleeding by 46 percent. [More]

Research: Steroids in spinal shots may not provide relief from lower back pain

New research from Johns Hopkins suggests that it may not be the steroids in spinal shots that provide relief from lower back pain, but the mere introduction of any of a number of fluids, such as anesthetics and saline, to the space around the spinal cord. [More]