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Genetic decanalization can lead to complex genetic diseases in humans

Genetic decanalization can lead to complex genetic diseases in humans

The information encoded in the DNA of an organism is not sufficient to determine the expression pattern of genes. This fact has been known even before the discovery of epigenetics, which refers to external modifications to the DNA that turn genes "on" or "off". [More]
Drosophila Research Conference to highlight recent advances in genetics research

Drosophila Research Conference to highlight recent advances in genetics research

Over 1,500 scientists from 30 countries and 46 states will attend next week's 56th Annual Drosophila Research Conference organized by the Genetics Society of America, March 4–8 in Chicago, IL. [More]
Agena releases MassARRAY 24-Well System for mass spectrometry-based genetic testing

Agena releases MassARRAY 24-Well System for mass spectrometry-based genetic testing

Agena Bioscience today released the MassARRAY 24-Well System for mass spectrometry-based genetic analysis, adding to its existing MassARRAY portfolio. The new 24-well format is tailored to smaller clinical testing laboratories requiring modest sample throughput, reduced initial hardware costs, and reduced time to result. [More]
Epigenetics and women’s health research: an interview with Professor Steve Conlan, Swansea University

Epigenetics and women’s health research: an interview with Professor Steve Conlan, Swansea University

Our research into gynaecological oncology focuses around understanding mechanisms of how genes are regulated or how they become dysregulated in a disease; and also the effects that has on the surface of the endometrium and also the function of the ovaries... [More]
Epigenome plays significant part in embryonic development

Epigenome plays significant part in embryonic development

The early stages of embryonic development shape our cells and tissues for life. It is during this time that our newly formed cells are transformed into heart, skin, nerve or other cell types. Scientists are finding that this process is largely controlled not by the genome, but by the epigenome, chemical markers on DNA that tell cells when to turn genes on and off. [More]
MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

MD Anderson awarded more than $22 million in research grants from CPRIT

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has received more than $22 million in research grants this week from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. Approximately half of the funds awarded for Individual Investigator Research Awards went to MD Anderson faculty as well as 40 percent of total IIRA awards that include those for children's and adolescent cancer and early detection and prevention. [More]
New study turns to epigenetics to look for new therapeutic targets to treat allergic diseases

New study turns to epigenetics to look for new therapeutic targets to treat allergic diseases

Scientists have discovered over 30 new genes that predispose people to allergies and asthma, some of which could be targets for new drugs. [More]
Study findings could lead to new potential drug targets for allergic diseases

Study findings could lead to new potential drug targets for allergic diseases

Scientists have discovered over 30 new genes that predispose people to allergies and asthma, some of which could be targets for new drugs. [More]
NYU Langone, Technion collaborate to advance cancer research

NYU Langone, Technion collaborate to advance cancer research

In a groundbreaking step forward to advance global collaboration in the fight against cancer, two of the world's preeminent academic and research institutions -- NYU Langone Medical Center and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology -- formally announced a $9 million gift from philanthropists Laura and Isaac Perlmutter that will fund two major, joint research endeavors with potentially far-reaching impact in advancing cancer research. [More]
Sigma-Aldrich announces release of Next-Gen Sequencing Oligos

Sigma-Aldrich announces release of Next-Gen Sequencing Oligos

Sigma-Aldrich Corporation today announced that Sigma Life Science, its innovative biological products and services business, released Next-Gen Sequencing Oligos, custom next-generation sequencing adapters that improve target sequence assembly. [More]
TNF signaling molecule triggers Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis

TNF signaling molecule triggers Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis

Cells lining the intestinal tract form a critical barrier, protecting our bodies from the billions of bacteria living in the gut. Breaches in this barrier are driven largely by a single signaling molecule called tumor necrosis factor (TNF), elevated amounts of which are associated with inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. [More]
New study examines the methylome of triple-negative breast cancer

New study examines the methylome of triple-negative breast cancer

The new study, published in Nature Communications, compares the breast cancer DNA 'methylome' with that of healthy individuals. The methylome provides a new picture of the genome and shows how it is epigenetically 'decorated' with methyl groups, a process known as DNA 'methylation'. [More]
Study provides common model of cellular ageing

Study provides common model of cellular ageing

Researchers at the BBSRC-supported Babraham Institute have mapped the physical structure of the nuclear landscape in unprecedented detail to understand changes in genomic interactions occurring in cell senescence and ageing. Their findings have allowed them to reconcile the contradictory observations of two current models of ageing: cellular senescence of connective tissue cells called fibroblasts and cellular models of an accelerated ageing syndrome. [More]
Study discovers microRNA signatures that could predict prognosis, distant metastasis in colorectal cancer

Study discovers microRNA signatures that could predict prognosis, distant metastasis in colorectal cancer

A new study developed at the Center for Gastrointestinal Cancer Research and the Center for Epigenetics, Cancer Prevention and Cancer Genomics at Baylor Research Institute has discovered unique metastasis-specific microRNA signatures in primary colorectal cancers that could predict prognosis and distant metastasis in colorectal cancer. [More]
NEB announces introduction of one-step cloning and multiple DNA fragment assembly

NEB announces introduction of one-step cloning and multiple DNA fragment assembly

New England Biolabs announces the introduction of the NEBuilder HiFi DNA Assembly Cloning Kit and Master Mix for one-step cloning and multiple DNA fragment assembly in as little as 15 minutes. [More]
Kyowa Hakko Kirin and Syndax sign agreement to develop entinostat in Japan and Korea

Kyowa Hakko Kirin and Syndax sign agreement to develop entinostat in Japan and Korea

Kyowa Hakko Kirin Co., Ltd., (Headquarters: Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo; president and CEO: Nobuo Hanai, "Kyowa Hakko Kirin") and Syndax Pharmaceuticals, Inc., (Waltham, Mass.; president and CEO: Arlene M. Morris, "Syndax") today jointly announced that the companies have entered into a license agreement for the exclusive rights to develop and commercialize entinostat in Japan and Korea. [More]
Research may provide new route to prevention and treatment of diabetes

Research may provide new route to prevention and treatment of diabetes

An analysis of the genomes and epigenomes of lean and obese mice and humans has turned up a wealth of clues about how genes and the environment conspire to trigger diabetes, Johns Hopkins researchers say. [More]
Offspring of mice treated with drug had delayed onset, reduced symptoms of Huntington's disease

Offspring of mice treated with drug had delayed onset, reduced symptoms of Huntington's disease

Famine, drug abuse and even stress can "silence" certain genes, causing health problems in generations to come. Now scientists are wondering—could therapies that change gene expression in parents help their children? [More]
Porvair Sciences releases 2015 catalogue of tissue culture plastics and epigenetic consumables

Porvair Sciences releases 2015 catalogue of tissue culture plastics and epigenetic consumables

Porvair Sciences has released a new 2015 catalogue that describes its popular range of high quality tissue culture treated plastics and consumable products for Epigenetics. [More]
Broccoli can help reduce HGPS-related defects

Broccoli can help reduce HGPS-related defects

Children who suffer from Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome age prematurely due to a defective protein in their cells. Scientists at Technische Universität München have now identified another important pathological factor: the system responsible for removing cellular debris and for breaking down defective proteins operates at lower levels in HGPS cells than in normal cells. The researchers have succeeded in reactivating protein breakdown in HGPS cells and thus reducing disease-related defects by using a substance from broccoli. [More]