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Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

For decades, researchers in the genetics field have theorized that the protein spools around which DNA is wound, histones, remain constant in the brain, never changing after development in the womb. [More]
Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea Biotechnologies Inc. announced today that it is partnering with Aelan Cell Technologies Inc. (San Francisco, California) for the development, validation and commercialization of novel biomarker tests and companion diagnostics using human STEM cells as models. [More]
Males may play positive role in development of offspring's brains before pregnancy

Males may play positive role in development of offspring's brains before pregnancy

A new study from Indiana University provides evidence in mice that males may play a positive role in the development of offspring's brains starting before pregnancy. [More]
NIDA announces recipients of Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS, genetics or epigenetics research

NIDA announces recipients of Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS, genetics or epigenetics research

The National Institute on Drug Abuse today announced the first six recipients of its two newly developed Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS and genetics or epigenetics research. The Avenir (meaning "future" in French) Awards support early stage investigators who propose highly innovative studies. The six scientists will each receive up to $300,000 per year for five years to support their research. [More]
Experimental new treatment approach can send deadly leukemia into remission

Experimental new treatment approach can send deadly leukemia into remission

An experimental new treatment approach for a rare, deadly leukemia can send the disease into remission even in patients for whom the standard therapy has failed, buying them more time to have the stem cell transplant that could save their lives, a small pilot study has found. [More]
HUJI professor honored with Helmholtz International Fellow Award for epigenetics research

HUJI professor honored with Helmholtz International Fellow Award for epigenetics research

The Israeli immunologist and cancer researcher Professor Yehudit Bergman of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, has been honored with the Helmholtz International Fellow Award for her excellent research. In a prize ceremony at the MDC Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association in Berlin, Germany, MDC's interim director Professor Thomas Sommer presented the certificate to her on Thursday, June 18th, 2015. [More]
Novartis presents positive Phase III results of Farydak therapy at EHA

Novartis presents positive Phase III results of Farydak therapy at EHA

Novartis today presented results from a pivotal Phase III clinical trial exploratory subgroup analysis showing a 7.8-month improvement in median progression-free survival when using Farydak in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone in patients with relapsed or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma who had received two or more prior regimens, including bortezomib and an immunomodulatory agent. [More]
Certain ARID1a mutations sensitize some tumors to PARP inhibitor drugs

Certain ARID1a mutations sensitize some tumors to PARP inhibitor drugs

Mutations in ARID1a, which are common in many cancer types, disrupt DNA damage repair in cancer cells, allowing the cancer to progress. This gene may also be an Achilles' heel when treating certain tumors, according to a team of researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
University of Chicago scientists develop new technique to accurately measure epigenetic changes

University of Chicago scientists develop new technique to accurately measure epigenetic changes

One of the most widely used tools in epigenetics research - the study of how DNA packaging affects gene expression - is chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), a technique that allows researchers to examine interactions between specific proteins and genomic regions. However, ChIP is a relative measurement, and has significant limitations that can lead to errors, poor reproducibility and an inability to be compared between experiments. [More]
US Equity Holdings announces new funding to launch Aelan Cell Technologies

US Equity Holdings announces new funding to launch Aelan Cell Technologies

US Equity Holdings announced yesterday that it has secured funding to launch Aelan Cell Technologies, a biotech startup engaged in the research, discovery, development and commercialization of innovative biomedical technologies and diagnostic tools for the advancement of human health and longevity. [More]
Boehringer announces LUX-Lung 8 data that compares efficacy of afatinib, erlotinib in patients with advanced SCC

Boehringer announces LUX-Lung 8 data that compares efficacy of afatinib, erlotinib in patients with advanced SCC

Boehringer Ingelheim today announced overall survival (OS) results from the LUX-Lung 8 trial (NCT01523587) that directly compared the efficacy and safety of two EGFR-directed treatments, afatinib and erlotinib, in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung, progressing after treatment with first-line chemotherapy. Treatment with afatinib significantly reduced the risk of death by 19%, extending the survival of patients to a median of 7.9 months compared to 6.8 months on erlotinib. [More]
MHICN expands clinical research program in collaboration with Erasmus Medical Center and ErasmusAGE

MHICN expands clinical research program in collaboration with Erasmus Medical Center and ErasmusAGE

Metagenics Healthcare Institute for Clinical Nutrition announced today an expanded clinical research program in collaboration with Erasmus Medical Center and ErasmusAGE, from Rotterdam, the Netherlands – a leading global healthcare center in epidemiology and health outcomes research. [More]
Precision medicine helps improve patient health and reduces risk of side effects, says Penn Medical School dean

Precision medicine helps improve patient health and reduces risk of side effects, says Penn Medical School dean

The rapidly emerging field of precision medicine is a "disruptive innovation" that offers the possibility of remarkably fine-tuned remedies to improve patient health while minimizing the risk of harmful side effects, says J. Larry Jameson, MD, PhD, dean of the Perelman School of Medicine and executive vice president of the University of Pennsylvania for the Health System, in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Investigating epigenetic marks in ancient DNA could help understand health of ancient populations

Investigating epigenetic marks in ancient DNA could help understand health of ancient populations

A new study by anthropologists from The University of Texas at Austin shows for the first time that epigenetic marks on DNA can be detected in a large number of ancient human remains, which may lead to further understanding about the effects of famine and disease in the ancient world. [More]
Researchers identify gene vital to production of pain-sensing neurons in humans

Researchers identify gene vital to production of pain-sensing neurons in humans

A gene essential to the production of pain-sensing neurons in humans has been identified by an international team of researchers co-led by the University of Cambridge. The discovery, reported today in the journal Nature Genetics, could have implications for the development of new methods of pain relief. [More]
Certain proteins may slow cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer's disease

Certain proteins may slow cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer's disease

Certain proteins may slow the devastating memory loss caused by Alzheimer's disease, according to a groundbreaking Iowa State University study. [More]
Walnut-enriched diet may slow colorectal tumor growth

Walnut-enriched diet may slow colorectal tumor growth

A new animal study from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, led by Dr. Christos Mantzoros, indicates that a diet containing walnuts may slow colorectal tumor growth by causing beneficial changes in cancer genes. [More]
Researcher reports possible existence of sixth DNA base

Researcher reports possible existence of sixth DNA base

DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is the main component of our genetic material. It is formed by combining four parts: A, C, G and T (adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine), called bases of DNA combine in thousands of possible sequences to provide the genetic variability that enables the wealth of aspects and functions of living beings. [More]
NEB announces issuance of US patent for RNA-seq technology

NEB announces issuance of US patent for RNA-seq technology

New England Biolabs, Inc. announces the issuance of United States Patent Number 8,999,677, which describes a novel method for retaining valuable strand-specific information contained within RNA transcripts. [More]
Rudolf Jaenisch honored with 2015 March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology

Rudolf Jaenisch honored with 2015 March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology

Rudolf Jaenisch, MD, who laid the groundwork for the development and use of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells - stem cells derived directly from adult tissue -- to potentially treat and cure a variety of human diseases, has received the 20th anniversary March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology. [More]
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