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Resverlogix presents new data on RVX-208 orally active BET inhibitor at ESC Congress 2015

Resverlogix presents new data on RVX-208 orally active BET inhibitor at ESC Congress 2015

Resverlogix Corp. is pleased to announce that Dr. Norman Wong, chief scientific officer of Resverlogix Corp. presented new data at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2015 in a poster presentation titled: "RVX-208, an orally active BET inhibitor, lowers CVD risk by activities beyond raising ApoA-I/HDL." [More]
Researchers identify druggable target to potentially root out colon cancer, end relapse

Researchers identify druggable target to potentially root out colon cancer, end relapse

Researchers targeting colorectal cancer stem cells - the root cause of disease, resistance to treatment and relapse - have discovered a mechanism to mimic a virus and potentially trigger an immune response to fight the cancer like an infection. [More]
Theresa Alenghat receives 2015 AGA-CCFA-Janssen Research Award in IBD Epigenetics Research

Theresa Alenghat receives 2015 AGA-CCFA-Janssen Research Award in IBD Epigenetics Research

The American Gastroenterological Association, in partnership with the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America and Janssen Biotech, Inc., announced today that Theresa Alenghat, VMD, PhD, from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, OH, was awarded with the 2015 AGA-CCFA-Janssen Research Award in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Epigenetics Research. [More]
FDA, EMA accept filing applications for Boehringer Ingelheim's afatinib to treat patients with advanced SCC of the lung

FDA, EMA accept filing applications for Boehringer Ingelheim's afatinib to treat patients with advanced SCC of the lung

Boehringer Ingelheim today announced that both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency have accepted filing applications for afatinib for the treatment of patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung progressing after treatment with first-line chemotherapy. [More]
BET inhibitors can cause molecular changes in neurons, lead to memory loss in mice

BET inhibitors can cause molecular changes in neurons, lead to memory loss in mice

Cancer researchers are constantly in search of more-effective and less-toxic approaches to stopping the disease, and have recently launched clinical trials testing a new class of drugs called BET inhibitors. These therapies act on a group of proteins that help regulate the expression of many genes, some of which play a role in cancer. [More]
Understanding the causes of sudden death in epilepsy: an interview with Professor Sanjay Sisodiya

Understanding the causes of sudden death in epilepsy: an interview with Professor Sanjay Sisodiya

SUDEP is the sudden unexpected witnessed or unwitnessed, non-traumatic and non-drowning death in people with epilepsy, with or without evidence of a seizure. It doesn’t necessarily have to be in the known context of a seizure, excluding documented status epilepticus, where people have seizure after seizure. [More]
Potential biomarker could help prevent pre-diabetic individuals from developing Type II diabetes

Potential biomarker could help prevent pre-diabetic individuals from developing Type II diabetes

Virginia Tech researchers have identified a biomarker in pre-diabetic individuals that could help prevent them from developing Type II diabetes. [More]
PrediXcan method improves detection of genes linked to complex diseases, biological traits of interest

PrediXcan method improves detection of genes linked to complex diseases, biological traits of interest

A new computational method developed by scientists from the University of Chicago improves the detection of genes that are likely to be causal for complex diseases and biological traits. The method, PrediXcan, estimates gene expression levels across the whole genome - a better measure of biological action than single mutations - and integrates it with genome-wide association study (GWAS) data. [More]

Adults exposed to childhood physical or sexual abuse at risk for ulcerative colitis

Adults who were exposed to childhood physical or sexual abuse were approximately twice as likely to have ulcerative colitis, according to a new nationally representative study from four researchers at the University of Toronto. [More]
Animal study shows children exposed to famine grow smaller, become susceptible to metabolic diseases

Animal study shows children exposed to famine grow smaller, become susceptible to metabolic diseases

Starvation early in life can alter an organism for generations to come, according to a new study in roundworms. The effects are what Duke University biologist Ryan Baugh terms a "bet-hedging strategy." [More]
Environmental factors promote genetic mutations, have underappreciated effect on disease, evolution

Environmental factors promote genetic mutations, have underappreciated effect on disease, evolution

Washington State University researchers say environmental factors are having an underappreciated effect on the course of disease and evolution by prompting genetic mutations through epigenetics, a process by which genes are turned on and off independent of an organism's DNA sequence. [More]
Reducing incorrect gene expression can extend lifespan of cells

Reducing incorrect gene expression can extend lifespan of cells

Working with yeast and worms, researchers found that incorrect gene expression is a hallmark of aged cells and that reducing such "noise" extends lifespan in these organisms. The team published their findings this month in Genes & Development. [More]
New Histone Antibody Specificity Database allows scientists to find right antibodies for biomedical research

New Histone Antibody Specificity Database allows scientists to find right antibodies for biomedical research

For years, a crisis has been brewing in molecular biology. The problem is that antibodies--research tools used to identify key proteins at work in a cell--aren't always what they seem. Unreliable antibodies have led to numerous instances of false findings, failed experiments, and wasted money and samples. [More]
Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

The Endocrine Society today announced it has chosen 18 accomplished endocrinologists as winners of the organization's prestigious 2016 Laureate Awards. [More]
Losing single night of sleep could alter genes that control biological clocks in cells

Losing single night of sleep could alter genes that control biological clocks in cells

Swedish researchers at Uppsala University and the Karolinska Institute have found that genes that control the biological clocks in cells throughout the body are altered after losing a single night of sleep, in a study that is to be published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. [More]
Study finds mechanism that identifies cause of intellectual disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome

Study finds mechanism that identifies cause of intellectual disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome

The term intellectual disability covers a large number of clinical entities, some with known cause and others of uncertain origin. For example Down syndrome is due to an extra copy of chromosome 21 and Rett syndrome is in part caused by a mutation in the control switch gene called MeCP2. [More]
LSD1 enzyme turns off genes needed to maintain cancer stem cell properties in glioblastoma

LSD1 enzyme turns off genes needed to maintain cancer stem cell properties in glioblastoma

Cancer's ability to grow unchecked is often attributed to cancer stem cells, a small fraction of cancer cells that have the capacity to grow and multiply indefinitely. How cancer stem cells retain this property while the bulk of a tumor's cells do not remains largely unknown. Using human tumor samples and mouse models, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center discovered that cancer stem cell properties are determined by epigenetic changes -- chemical modifications cells use to control which genes are turned on or off. [More]
Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

For decades, researchers in the genetics field have theorized that the protein spools around which DNA is wound, histones, remain constant in the brain, never changing after development in the womb. [More]
Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea Biotechnologies Inc. announced today that it is partnering with Aelan Cell Technologies Inc. (San Francisco, California) for the development, validation and commercialization of novel biomarker tests and companion diagnostics using human STEM cells as models. [More]
Males may play positive role in development of offspring's brains before pregnancy

Males may play positive role in development of offspring's brains before pregnancy

A new study from Indiana University provides evidence in mice that males may play a positive role in the development of offspring's brains starting before pregnancy. [More]
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