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Researchers uncover mechanism that helps white fat cells to become browner

Researchers uncover mechanism that helps white fat cells to become browner

White adipose tissue stores excess calories as fat that can be released for use in other organs during fasting. Mammals also have small amounts of brown adipose tissue, which primarily acts as an effective fat burner for the production of heat. Now researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have uncovered the mechanism by which white fat cells from humans gets reprogrammed to become browner. [More]
Study: Long-term endurance training alters epigenetic pattern in the human skeletal muscle

Study: Long-term endurance training alters epigenetic pattern in the human skeletal muscle

A new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that long-term endurance training in a stable way alters the epigenetic pattern in the human skeletal muscle. The research team behind the study, which is being published in the journal Epigenetics, also found strong links between these altered epigenetic patterns and the activity in genes controlling improved metabolism and inflammation. [More]
Study finds that disarray in methylation helps tumors adapt to changing circumstances

Study finds that disarray in methylation helps tumors adapt to changing circumstances

The genetic tumult within cancerous tumors is more than matched by the disorder in one of the mechanisms for switching cells' genes on and off, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard report in a new study. [More]
Growth genes seem different in Hunger Winter children

Growth genes seem different in Hunger Winter children

Individuals conceived in the severe Dutch Famine, also called the Hunger Winter, may have adjusted to this horrendous period of World War II by making adaptations to how active their DNA is. Genes involved in growth and development were differentially regulated, according to researchers at the Leiden University Medical Center, Harvard University, and Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
DFG to establish eight new Collaborative Research Centres

DFG to establish eight new Collaborative Research Centres

The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) will establish eight new Collaborative Research Centres (CRCs). [More]
DFG to establish new Collaborative Research Centres

DFG to establish new Collaborative Research Centres

The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) will establish eight new Collaborative Research Centres (CRCs). [More]
Choosing the best way to verify the quality and quantity of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation DNA

Choosing the best way to verify the quality and quantity of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation DNA

Porvair Sciences has published a new guide to help laboratories choose the best way to verify the quality and quantity of their Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) DNA. [More]
Effecting changes to FosB gene could help control addiction, depression

Effecting changes to FosB gene could help control addiction, depression

Regulation of a single, specific gene in a brain region related to drug addiction and depression is sufficient to reduce drug and stress responses, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published October 27 online in the journal Nature Neuroscience. [More]
High-absorption BCM-95 Curcumin can reduce spread of cancer cells

High-absorption BCM-95 Curcumin can reduce spread of cancer cells

A recently published cellular study on colorectal cancer showed that high-absorption BCM-95 Curcumin is able to reduce the spread of cancer cells and potentially increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced colon cancer. [More]
Effects of unhealthy lifestyle persist even after atherosclerosis treatment

Effects of unhealthy lifestyle persist even after atherosclerosis treatment

Almost everyone knows that improving your eating habits will most likely improve your health. What most people may not know, however, is that the effects of poor eating habits persist long after dietary habits are improved. In a new report appearing in the November 2014 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, scientists use mice to show that even after successful treatment of atherosclerosis (including lowering of blood cholesterol and a change in dietary habits) the effects of an unhealthy lifestyle still affect the way the immune system functions. [More]
Douglas Mental Health University Institute researcher wins 2014 Wilder-Penfield prize

Douglas Mental Health University Institute researcher wins 2014 Wilder-Penfield prize

The Douglas Mental Health University Institute is proud to announce that its researcher and neurobiologist, Michael Meaney, C.M., Ph.D., C.Q., FRSC, is the 2014 laureate of the prestigious prix Wilder-Penfield. [More]
Epicure project: an interview with Frédéric Cren

Epicure project: an interview with Frédéric Cren

Epicure is a project led by Inventiva and Institut Curie that aims to deliver pre-clinical candidates on two novel epigenetic targets that have been selected due to their potential to activate immune responses against cancer cells. In addition one of these two targets has potential in respiratory indications such as asthma or COPD. [More]
InSilico Medicine, CCARL collaborate to improve personalized medicine projects in multiple sclerosis

InSilico Medicine, CCARL collaborate to improve personalized medicine projects in multiple sclerosis

InSilico Medicine, the company focused on drug discovery for cancer and age-related diseases, announced its investment in a research collaboration with Canada Cancer and Aging Research Laboratories, Inc. The companies will collaborate on improving decision making in clinical oncology and discovery, and personalized medicine projects in multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Van Andel Research Institute commits $7.5M to support epigenetic therapy in cancer treatment

Van Andel Research Institute commits $7.5M to support epigenetic therapy in cancer treatment

The work of one of the Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) inaugural Dream Teams, launched in 2009 to focus on epigenetic therapy in cancer treatment, will continue with the commitment of $7.5 million from Van Andel Research Institute (VARI). [More]
NIH presents 2014 New Innovator Award to Penn Medicine researcher

NIH presents 2014 New Innovator Award to Penn Medicine researcher

Roberto Bonasio, PhD, an assistant professor of Cell and Developmental Biology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and a core member of the Penn Epigenetics Program is one of the recipients of a 2014 New Innovator Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). [More]
New England Biolabs inks deal to supply critical reagents to TriLink BioTechnologies

New England Biolabs inks deal to supply critical reagents to TriLink BioTechnologies

New England Biolabs, Inc. (NEB®) has strengthened its position as a key supplier to the fast-growing RNA synthesis market by signing an agreement to supply critical reagents to TriLink BioTechnologies, Inc., a leading manufacturer of mRNA and long RNA for research, diagnostic and therapeutic applications. [More]
Salk researchers receive BRAIN Initiative funding

Salk researchers receive BRAIN Initiative funding

Joseph Ecker, a Salk professor and Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, and Margarita Behrens, Salk staff scientist, have been named recipients in the 2014 round of grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) through the BRAIN (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies) Initiative for leading-edge work in neuroscience. [More]
Prenatal maternal stress exposure to Quebec ice storm predicts epigenetic profile of offspring

Prenatal maternal stress exposure to Quebec ice storm predicts epigenetic profile of offspring

The number of days an expectant mother was deprived of electricity during Quebec's Ice Storm (1998) predicts the epigenetic profile of her child, a new study finds. [More]
Scientists discover new clues about drug used in treating blood cancer

Scientists discover new clues about drug used in treating blood cancer

Keck Medicine of USC scientists have discovered new clues about a drug instrumental in treating a certain blood cancer that may provide important targets for researchers searching for cures. [More]
NCCN ORP awards four research grants to advance development of nintedanib

NCCN ORP awards four research grants to advance development of nintedanib

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network Oncology Research Program has awarded four grants to investigators to evaluate and define the clinical effectiveness of the investigational compound nintedanib (BIBF 1120) in non-small cell lung, colorectal, and gastrointestinal cancers. [More]