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Penn researchers construct model to examine how immune system may evolve to conquer HIV

Penn researchers construct model to examine how immune system may evolve to conquer HIV

It has remained frustratingly difficult to develop a vaccine for HIV/AIDS, in part because the virus, once in our bodies, rapidly reproduces and evolves to escape being killed by the immune system. [More]
Researchers identify specific pathways involved in development of mucormycosis

Researchers identify specific pathways involved in development of mucormycosis

Research published today in the journal, Nature Communications, provides new insights into the evolution of Mucorales fungi, which cause a fatal infection in ever-increasing segments of patient population, and several molecular pathways that might be exploited as potential therapeutic or diagnostic targets. [More]
Researchers identify genetic causes underlying higher rate of melanoma in men

Researchers identify genetic causes underlying higher rate of melanoma in men

A study led by researchers at Universitat Jaume I de Castellón has identified one of the genetic causes underlying the higher rate of melanoma in men. The results have been published in Biology of Sex Differences. [More]
Researchers identify stress mechanism in the brain that appears to act as social switch

Researchers identify stress mechanism in the brain that appears to act as social switch

Meeting new people can be both stressful and rewarding. Research at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, reported today in Nature Neuroscience, suggests that a molecule involved in regulating stress in the brain may also help determine how willing we are to leave the safety of our social group and strike up new relationships. [More]
Researchers find immune system directly affects, controls social behavior

Researchers find immune system directly affects, controls social behavior

In a startling discovery that raises fundamental questions about human behavior, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have determined that the immune system directly affects - and even controls - creatures' social behavior, such as their desire to interact with others. [More]
Two new studies find potential genetic cause and new treatment method for autoimmune diseases

Two new studies find potential genetic cause and new treatment method for autoimmune diseases

The American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association, Inc. is spotlighting two new research studies originally reported in ScienceDaily. [More]
Changes in cavefish metabolism could lead to new insights into diabetes

Changes in cavefish metabolism could lead to new insights into diabetes

Cavefish that live in dark caves with only sporadic access to food show symptoms similar to diabetes, but don't appear to experience any health problems. [More]
Fecal transplants may help treat home and hospital-acquired scourge

Fecal transplants may help treat home and hospital-acquired scourge

Fecal transplants are increasingly being used as the treatment of last resort for certain infections in the human gut and have had remarkable success treating the nursing home and hospital-acquired scourge, Clostridium difficile colitis, an infectious diarrhea that often follows antibiotic treatment. [More]
Scientists use machine learning to interpret mosquito genome

Scientists use machine learning to interpret mosquito genome

Scientists are using machine learning to identify important sequences of DNA within the mosquito genome that regulate how the insect's cells develop and behave. [More]
Aerobic exercise training reestablishes cardiac protein quality control system in heart failure rats

Aerobic exercise training reestablishes cardiac protein quality control system in heart failure rats

Aerobic exercise training restored the cardiac protein quality control system in rats showed a study recently published in Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine. [More]
Standard methods may completely underestimate global obesity burden

Standard methods may completely underestimate global obesity burden

Standard methods for estimating obesity may grossly underestimate the burden of overweight worldwide -- on the scale of hundreds of millions -- according to a paper published in Obesity Reviews. [More]
New research highlights need to abandon modern hygiene hypothesis

New research highlights need to abandon modern hygiene hypothesis

The July issue of Perspectives in Public Health (published by the Royal Society of Public Health) takes an objective view of ongoing research showing that the hygiene hypothesis – the idea that allergies are the price we are paying for our “modern obsession with cleanliness” – is a misleading misnomer. [More]

Frontier Medical Group introduces new hybrid mattress to help prevent, treat pressure ulcers

Frontier Medical Group, the specialist medical device manufacturer, has expanded its Repose range with the launch of Ultracore, a new hybrid mattress designed to aid in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. [More]
Tiny viruses speed-up evolution of bacteria causing infections in cystic fibrosis patients

Tiny viruses speed-up evolution of bacteria causing infections in cystic fibrosis patients

SCIENTISTS in the UK have found new evidence that tiny viruses called bacteriophages turbo-charge the evolution of bacteria that cause lung infections in Cystic Fibrosis patients. [More]
Researchers investigate neural patterns underlying development of walking behaviours

Researchers investigate neural patterns underlying development of walking behaviours

Even before they stand up, infants have a rough idea of how to walk; they just need some time to lay down the right neural wiring. Understanding how babies take their first steps can also help us to improve the rehabilitation of patients recovering from spinal cord injury, and children with cerebral palsy. [More]
Researchers identify non-coding RNA NEAT1 as potential drug target to combat cancer

Researchers identify non-coding RNA NEAT1 as potential drug target to combat cancer

A team of researchers led by professor Jean-Christophe Marine has identified NEAT1, a non-coding RNA, as a potential therapeutic target in the fight against cancer. [More]
Studies shed more light on relation between bacteria, immune system and antibiotics

Studies shed more light on relation between bacteria, immune system and antibiotics

Antibiotics and the immune system are the two forces that cope with bacterial infections. Now, two studies from Isabel Gordo's laboratory, at Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, show for the first time that resistance to antibiotics and to the immune system is interconnected in bacteria. [More]
New research holds potential to improve fetal surgery outcomes

New research holds potential to improve fetal surgery outcomes

University of California, Berkeley engineer Phillip Messersmith is happy to be learning lessons from a lowly mollusk, with the expectation that the knowledge gained will enable him and fellow physicians to prevent deaths among their youngest patients -- those who haven't been born yet. [More]
'Comprehensive' management approach needed for AF

'Comprehensive' management approach needed for AF

Death is a bigger risk than stroke among patients with atrial fibrillation, particularly during the first 4 months after diagnosis, research shows. [More]
UTHealth researchers receive $11 million grant to study prion diseases

UTHealth researchers receive $11 million grant to study prion diseases

Led by Claudio Soto, Ph.D., researchers from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston have been awarded $11 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to study the pathogenesis, transmission and detection of prion diseases - such as chronic wasting disease in deer - that can potentially spread to humans. [More]
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