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Researchers find new mutation signature in cancer cells

Researchers find new mutation signature in cancer cells

Mutations are the replacement of DNA bases known as Adenine (A), Cytosine (C), Guanine (G) and Thymine (T) with other bases. When mutations such as C to T or G to A are found within a specific DNA sequence, this is known as a mutation signature. [More]
CNIO team uses network theory to build and study first epigenetic communication network

CNIO team uses network theory to build and study first epigenetic communication network

One of the big questions for which there is still no clear answer in biology is how, based on the four universal letters that make up DNA, it is possible to generate such different organisms as a fly or a human, or the different organs and tissues they comprise. In recent years, researchers have discovered that the system is much more complicated than was originally thought. [More]
Scientists discover epigenetic switch linked to obesity

Scientists discover epigenetic switch linked to obesity

It is well known that a predisposition to adiposity lies in our genes. A new study by researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Freiburg now shows that it is also crucial how these genes are regulated. The scientists led by Andrew Pospisilik discovered a novel regulatory, epigenetic switch, which causes individuals with identical genetic material, such as monozygotic twins, to either be lean or obese. [More]
Genetic code and epigenetics revealing adaption traits

Genetic code and epigenetics revealing adaption traits

A well-known songbird, the great tit, has revealed its genetic code, offering researchers new insight into how species adapt to a changing planet. Their initial findings suggest that epigenetics -- what's on rather than what's in the gene -- may play a key role in the evolution of memory and learning. And that's not just true for birds. [More]

Robotic exoskeleton efficiently performs rehabilitation therapies for shoulder injuries

A team from the Centre for Automation and Robotics (CAR, UPM-CSIC) has developed a robotic exoskeleton that performs more efficiently rehabilitation therapies of patients with shoulder injuries. By using strength and motion sensors, the system assesses the degree of an injury and its evolution as the treatment progresses. [More]
Antivirulence antibiotics could evade resistance longer than traditional antibiotics

Antivirulence antibiotics could evade resistance longer than traditional antibiotics

We've all seen the headlines. "Man found to be shedding virulent strain of polio"; "Virulent flu strain in Europe hits the economy"; "Most virulent strain of E. coli ever seen contains DNA sequences from plague bacteria." [More]
UCA researchers create new animal models to study link between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease

UCA researchers create new animal models to study link between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease

In recent time, many epidemiological studies have proved very close links existing between diabetes and Alzheimer´s disease. In fact, it has been stated that diabetes is a significant risk factor for suffering from Alzheimer and vascular dementia, the two main causes of dementia. [More]
ISHLT issues new list of criteria to determine patient eligibility for heart transplant

ISHLT issues new list of criteria to determine patient eligibility for heart transplant

To determine patient eligibility for heart transplant, the International Society for Heart Lung Transplantation maintains a list of criteria, first issued in 2006, that acts as a guideline for physicians. [More]
ACP publishes new Strategy for improving cancer patient outcomes

ACP publishes new Strategy for improving cancer patient outcomes

The Association for Cancer Physicians, which represents and supports medical oncologists in the UK, has published a new Strategy for improving cancer patient services and outcomes. [More]
New CRISPR technology can be used to make designer babies

New CRISPR technology can be used to make designer babies

How should we handle the new CRISPR technology that can both advance science and medicine, but also be used to make designer babies? Scientist and author Paul Knoepfler tackles this and other difficult questions related to this revolutionary technology in his new book, GMO Sapiens: The Life-Changing Science of Designer Babies, targeted at a broad, lay audience. [More]
Study supports argument that declining PSA screening may lead to avoidable cancer deaths

Study supports argument that declining PSA screening may lead to avoidable cancer deaths

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation against regular prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening for prostate cancer (PCa) has been in place for two and a half years. Although the number of prostate needle biopsies (PNB) has been reduced, patients who undergo PNB are significantly more likely to be diagnosed with high risk disease, and detection of intermediate risk, potentially curable PCa has likely decreased. [More]
Study may hold new revelations about how stress during pregnancy affects mothers and offspring

Study may hold new revelations about how stress during pregnancy affects mothers and offspring

The sequencing of the first genome involving a cockroach species may one day serve as a model system comparable to how research on mice can apply to humans. In this case, the model could hold new revelations about how stress during pregnancy could affect both the mother and her offspring. [More]
Genetic mutation in starlings could shed light on mitochondrial disease in humans

Genetic mutation in starlings could shed light on mitochondrial disease in humans

Deakin University and UNSW Australia researchers have made a rare observation of rapid evolution in action in the wild, documenting the spread of a newly arisen genetic mutation in invasive starlings, which could shed light on mitochondrial disease in humans. [More]

Qualcomm Life expands global connected therapy management collaboration with Novartis

Qualcomm Incorporated today announced that its subsidiary, Qualcomm Life, Inc., and Novartis are expanding their global connected therapy management collaboration. Novartis will leverage Qualcomm Life's connectivity solutions to power its next-generation connected Breezhaler, the inhaler for its Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) portfolio. [More]
Study reveals promising mechanism for attacking Ebola virus

Study reveals promising mechanism for attacking Ebola virus

In late December, nearly two years after the epidemic began, the World Health Organization has declared the African country of Guinea to be free of Ebola virus infections. But, the race to find a cure and therapies to combat the disease are forging ahead as officials warn that inattention could lead to another epidemic. [More]
Anticholinergic medications do not affect cognitive performance in PD patients

Anticholinergic medications do not affect cognitive performance in PD patients

Recent evidence has shown a greater risk of dementia, in particular Alzheimer's disease (AD), in individuals using anticholinergic medications regularly. These drugs are widely used by older adults to treat bladder dysfunction, mood, and pain, and many of them are available without prescription. [More]

Marmosets appear to use auditory cues similar to humans to process pitch

The specialized human ability to perceive the sound quality known as 'pitch' can no longer be listed as unique to humans. Researchers at Johns Hopkins report new behavioral evidence that marmosets, ancient monkeys, appear to use auditory cues similar to humans to distinguish between low and high notes. [More]
Ebola virus and bats waging molecular battle for survival

Ebola virus and bats waging molecular battle for survival

Ebola virus and bats have been waging a molecular battle for survival that may have started at least 25 million years ago, according to a study led by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, the University of Colorado-Boulder (CU-Boulder) and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) that published online today in the journal eLife. [More]
New biopsy system shows promise for early detection of colorectal cancer

New biopsy system shows promise for early detection of colorectal cancer

A university spin-off, AWSensors, is coordinating the European project LIQBIOPSENS to develop liquid biopsy technologies for the early detection of colorectal cancer. [More]
Scientists outline molecular blueprints of tiny cellular 'nanomachine'

Scientists outline molecular blueprints of tiny cellular 'nanomachine'

Scientists have drawn up molecular blueprints of a tiny cellular ‘nanomachine’, whose evolution is an extraordinary feat of nature, by using one of the brightest X-ray sources on Earth. [More]
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