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Certain mosquito species genetically better at transmitting malaria

Certain mosquito species genetically better at transmitting malaria

Certain species of mosquitoes are genetically better at transmitting malaria than even some of their close cousins, according to a multi-institutional team of researchers including Virginia Tech scientists. [More]
CARsgen announces completion of series A financing

CARsgen announces completion of series A financing

CARsgen, a leader in the development of Chimeric Antigen Receptors T (CAR-T) cell immunotherapy to treat a variety of cancers, today announced the completion of a series A financing led by BVCF, a China-based healthcare private equity fund. [More]
Biologist Marnie Halpern selected as AAAS Fellow

Biologist Marnie Halpern selected as AAAS Fellow

Biologist Marnie Halpern of Carnegie's Department of Embryology has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for her "fundamental contributions to developmental biology, particularly using novel genetic approaches to study patterning of the nervous system." [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers develop online tool to speed up creation of new drugs to prevent Ebola virus

Johns Hopkins researchers develop online tool to speed up creation of new drugs to prevent Ebola virus

Johns Hopkins biomedical engineers have developed a free, browser-based online tool that could speed up the creation of new drugs to treat or prevent Ebola virus infections. [More]
Two UH scientists named as fellows of AAAS

Two UH scientists named as fellows of AAAS

Two scientists from the University of Houston have been elected as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. [More]
20th annual edition of NCCN Guidelines for Prostate Cancer published

20th annual edition of NCCN Guidelines for Prostate Cancer published

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network has published the 20th annual edition of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Prostate Cancer—one of the eight original NCCN Guidelines published in November 1996. [More]
Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Looking across evolutionary time and the genomic landscapes of humans and mice, an international group of researchers has found powerful clues to why certain processes and systems in the mouse - such as the immune system, metabolism and stress response - are so different from those in people. Building on years of mouse and gene regulation studies, they have developed a resource that can help scientists better understand how similarities and differences between mice and humans are written in their genomes. [More]
Targeting bacterial motility to combat chronic respiratory disease

Targeting bacterial motility to combat chronic respiratory disease

Mycoplasma gallisepticum causes chronic respiratory disease in birds. The illness particularly affects domestic chicken and turkey flocks. The bacteria are especially life-threatening for the animals when they occur in combination with other infections. In order to control the spread of the disease, poultry farms in the EU must be proven free from Mycoplasma gallisepticum or face being closed. [More]
New method could make Ebola surveillance quicker, cheaper for West African nations

New method could make Ebola surveillance quicker, cheaper for West African nations

A new method for examining the Ebola virus genome could make surveillance quicker and cheaper for West African nations, and help detect new forms of the virus. The detailed procedure is being shared with the research community along with the study paper, which is freely available in the open access journal Genome Biology. [More]
Massachusetts Eye and Ear offers femtosecond laser technology to Boston-area patients

Massachusetts Eye and Ear offers femtosecond laser technology to Boston-area patients

Patients choosing cataract surgery at Massachusetts Eye and Ear may now elect to have laser-assisted cataract surgery with the femtosecond LensSx® Laser. The hospital is one of the few in New England to offer the advanced technology, which enables surgeons to more precisely perform cataract surgery aided by a computer-controlled laser. [More]
Utah study shows men have better spatial and navigation skills than women

Utah study shows men have better spatial and navigation skills than women

A University of Utah study of two African tribes found evidence that men evolved better navigation ability than women because men with better spatial skills - the ability to mentally manipulate objects - can roam farther and have children with more mates. [More]
Study reveals the origin of world's AIDS pandemic

Study reveals the origin of world's AIDS pandemic

A study published in Science magazine reveals for the first time where, when and how the world's AIDS pandemic originated. Thanks to a statistical analysis of all the genetic data available on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), an international research team has just confirmed that the scourge broke out in 1920 in Kinshasa, the capital of what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. [More]
Researchers find that yellow fever mosquitoes contain odor-detecting gene

Researchers find that yellow fever mosquitoes contain odor-detecting gene

One of the world's deadliest mosquitoes sustains its taste for human blood thanks in part to a genetic tweak that makes it more sensitive to human odor, according to new research. [More]

Enterome, AbbVie to develop novel diagnostic products, therapies for microbiome-related diseases

ENTEROME Bioscience SA, a pioneer in the development of therapeutic solutions (drugs and diagnostics) based on a thorough understanding of the gut microbiome, announces that it has entered into a collaborative development agreement with AbbVie. [More]
UCSD researchers describe surprising role of protein in embryonic development

UCSD researchers describe surprising role of protein in embryonic development

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all blood and immune cells throughout the life of vertebrate organisms, from zebrafish to humans. But details of their genesis remain elusive, hindering efforts to develop induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) replacements that might address a host of blood disorders. [More]
Researchers obtain detailed picture of how Gas5 RNA interacts with steroid hormone receptors

Researchers obtain detailed picture of how Gas5 RNA interacts with steroid hormone receptors

It arises from what scientists previously described as "junk DNA" or "the dark matter of the genome," but this gene is definitely not junk. [More]
Single mutation in beta-catenin gene can lead to infertility

Single mutation in beta-catenin gene can lead to infertility

Scientists from the RIKEN BioResource Center in Tsukuba, Japan, have discovered that a single mutation in the beta-catenin gene, which codes a protein known to be deeply involved in a number of developmental and homeostatic processes, can lead to infertility not through a disruption of the production of egg or sperm cells, but rather by leading to abnormalities in the morphology of the sexual organs, making natural reproduction impossible. [More]
Study highlights connections between climate change and new outbreak of diseases

Study highlights connections between climate change and new outbreak of diseases

Climate change may affect human health directly or indirectly. In addition to increased threats of storms, flooding, droughts, and heat waves, other health risks are being identified. In particular, new diseases are appearing, caused by infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, parasites) heretofore unknown or that are changing, especially under the effect of changes in the climate (change of host, vector, pathogenicity, or strain). [More]
Study looks at new diagnostic, treatment approaches to neurological conditions

Study looks at new diagnostic, treatment approaches to neurological conditions

Despite great advances in understanding how the human brain works, psychiatric conditions, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain injuries are on the rise. Progress in the development of new diagnostic and treatment approaches appears to have stalled. In a special issue of the Cell Press journal Neuron, experts look at the challenges associated with "translational neuroscience," or efforts to bring advances in the lab to the patients who need them. [More]
New correlation found between specific molecular features of CLL and patients with different prognosis

New correlation found between specific molecular features of CLL and patients with different prognosis

If chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with a good or poor prognosis could be identified already at the time of diagnosis, physicians would have better possibilities to adjust their therapeutic and follow-up strategies. Now researchers at Uppsala University, together with international colleagues, have discovered a new correlation between specific molecular features of the disease and subgroups of patients with different prognosis. [More]