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Viewpoints: Many beneficiaries of health law don't vote; reboot for healthcare.gov

Viewpoints: Many beneficiaries of health law don't vote; reboot for healthcare.gov

For starters, my strong hunch from my own reporting in the region over the past couple years-;including several trips to Kentucky for a new book on McConnell-;is that the Democrats' biggest problem in Appalachia and the Upland South is not that the people who are benefitting from Obamacare or would stand to benefit from it if their states fully implemented the law are voting against their own interests, for Republicans. [More]
New approach to imaging metastatic tumors

New approach to imaging metastatic tumors

Bioluminescence, nanoparticles, gene manipulation - these sound like the ideas of a science fiction writer, but, in fact, they are components of an exciting new approach to imaging local and metastatic tumors. [More]
ICO-IDIBELL researchers identify 5 genes differentially expressed in colorectal tumors

ICO-IDIBELL researchers identify 5 genes differentially expressed in colorectal tumors

Researchers at the Catalan Institute of Oncology-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, led by David Garcia-Mollev- have identified 5 genes differentially expressed in normal accompanying cells in colorectal tumors. [More]
MOVANTIK tablets get FDA approval for treatment of OIC in patients with chronic, non-cancer pain

MOVANTIK tablets get FDA approval for treatment of OIC in patients with chronic, non-cancer pain

Nektar Therapeutics reported today that partner AstraZeneca today announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved MOVANTIK (naloxegol) tablets as the first once-daily oral peripherally-acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist (PAMORA) medication for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation (OIC), in adult patients with chronic, non-cancer pain. [More]
New research analyzes transmission rates of Ebola in West African countries

New research analyzes transmission rates of Ebola in West African countries

New research from Arizona State University and the University of Tokyo that analyzes transmission rates of Ebola in West African countries shows how rapidly the disease is spreading. [More]
NSF, NIH, USDA receive more than $12 million in new EEID grants

NSF, NIH, USDA receive more than $12 million in new EEID grants

Ebola, MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome), malaria, antibiotic-resistant infections: Is our interaction with the environment somehow responsible for their increased incidence? [More]
Research gives scientists new insight into evolution of gibbon genome

Research gives scientists new insight into evolution of gibbon genome

A team led by an Oregon Health & Science University researcher has sequenced and annotated the genome of the only ape whose DNA had yet to be sequenced - the gibbon, an endangered small ape that inhabits the tropical forests of Southeast Asia. [More]
Novel virus could be source of severe respiratory disease in ball pythons

Novel virus could be source of severe respiratory disease in ball pythons

Researchers have identified a novel virus that could be the source of a severe, sometimes fatal respiratory disease that has been observed in captive ball pythons since the 1990s. The work is published this week in mBio-, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Researchers unravel molecular mechanism of mRNA recognition

Researchers unravel molecular mechanism of mRNA recognition

The information encoded in our genes is translated into proteins, which ultimately mediate biological functions in an organism. [More]
Synthetic platelet-like particles could augment natural blood clotting for treatment of traumatic injuries

Synthetic platelet-like particles could augment natural blood clotting for treatment of traumatic injuries

A new class of synthetic platelet-like particles could augment natural blood clotting for the emergency treatment of traumatic injuries - and potentially offer doctors a new option for curbing surgical bleeding and addressing certain blood clotting disorders without the need for transfusions of natural platelets. [More]
Study: Innovative approaches required to decrease HIV transmission among Russian

Study: Innovative approaches required to decrease HIV transmission among Russian

Results of a new study conducted in St. Petersburg, Russia, show that decreasing HIV transmission among Russian HIV-infected drinkers will require creative and innovative approaches. [More]

CRHC launches new fully-featured website coruralhealth.org

The Colorado Rural Health Center (CRHC) – Colorado's nonprofit State Office of Rural Health and member-based association - today announced the launch of its new fully-featured website coruralhealth.org. [More]
Scientists develop synthetic amino acid that can impact 3D structure of bioactive peptides

Scientists develop synthetic amino acid that can impact 3D structure of bioactive peptides

One of the greatest challenges in modern medicine is developing drugs that are highly effective against a target, but with minimal toxicity and side-effects to the patient. Such properties are directly related to the 3D structure of the drug molecule. [More]
Special issue looks at how researchers use bioinformatics to understand plant form

Special issue looks at how researchers use bioinformatics to understand plant form

As technology advances, science has become increasingly about data-how to gather it, organize it, and analyze it. [More]
Climate change threatens survival of Devils Hole pupfish

Climate change threatens survival of Devils Hole pupfish

Climate change is hurting reproduction of the endangered Devils Hole pupfish, threatening the survival of this rare species that has numbered as few as 35 individuals, new research by the University of Nevada, Reno and Desert Research Institute shows. [More]
Pharmatech begins enrollment for AccessPPM program

Pharmatech begins enrollment for AccessPPM program

Pharmatech initiated enrollment for its AccessPPM program after a two-year investment into this game-changing method for matching cancer patients to cancer clinical trials. [More]
Researchers help to gain greater insight into biological clock that sets pace for daily life

Researchers help to gain greater insight into biological clock that sets pace for daily life

Casey Diekman, assistant professor of mathematical sciences at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), is helping to gain greater insight into the biological clock that sets the pace for daily life. [More]
Researchers report that predominant CA-MRSA strain migrated from sub-Saharan Africa

Researchers report that predominant CA-MRSA strain migrated from sub-Saharan Africa

The predominant strain of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infecting people in Europe, the Middle East and northern Africa derived from a single sub-Saharan ancestor, a team of international researchers reported this week in mBio-, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Reduce inflammatory reaction by losing weight, says researcher

Reduce inflammatory reaction by losing weight, says researcher

Researchers have found a possible molecular explanation for why overweight is harmful. This new knowledge may provide new drugs for heart attack, stroke, cancer and chronic intestinal inflammation. [More]
Viewpoints: 'Raw judicial politics' on health law; Texas abortion trial; suicide and gender

Viewpoints: 'Raw judicial politics' on health law; Texas abortion trial; suicide and gender

The Affordable Care Act -- Obamacare -- has endured so many near-death experiences that digging into the details of still another effort to demolish it is admittedly not an inviting prospect. (My own reaction, I confess, to hearing some months back about the latest legal challenge -- this one aimed at the supposed effect of a single word in the 900-page statute -- was something along the lines of "wake me when it's over.") But stay with me, because this latest round, catapulted onto the Supreme Court's docket earlier this month by the same forces that brought us the failed Commerce Clause attack two years ago, opens a window on raw judicial politics so extreme that the saga so far would be funny if the potential consequences weren't so serious (Linda Greenhouse, 8/20). [More]