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Scientists discover trypanosomes hiding in the skin of individuals with no symptoms

Scientists discover trypanosomes hiding in the skin of individuals with no symptoms

Scientists from the Trypanosome Cell Biology Unit (Institut Pasteur/Inserm), working in collaboration with scientists from the University of Glasgow, have demonstrated the presence of a large quantity of trypanosomes – the parasites responsible for sleeping sickness – in the skin of individuals with no symptoms. [More]
Bruker launches new AFM-based commercial PeakForce SECM probes for nanoparticle measurements

Bruker launches new AFM-based commercial PeakForce SECM probes for nanoparticle measurements

Bruker’s Nano Surfaces Division today announced the release of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) capability for its Dimension Icon atomic force microscope (AFM) platform. [More]
Tumour suppressor gene has greater anti-cancer activity than previously thought

Tumour suppressor gene has greater anti-cancer activity than previously thought

New insight into the function of a gene important in the suppression of cancer is published today. Researchers at the National University of Ireland Galway have shown that the TP53 gene has even greater anti-cancer activity than previously thought. [More]
Scientists discover genomic alterations in pediatric relapsed ALL

Scientists discover genomic alterations in pediatric relapsed ALL

A group of researchers from Columbia University, Rutgers University, and institutions in Europe and Japan have identified genomic alterations in pediatric relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that cause both therapy resistance and improved clinical response to multi-agent chemotherapy treatment. [More]
Gene therapy may be viable approach for treating CF lung problems

Gene therapy may be viable approach for treating CF lung problems

Two new studies from the University of Iowa suggest that gene therapy may be a viable approach for treating or preventing lung disease caused by cystic fibrosis. [More]
New study finds opioid dependence affects perception of cute images of babies

New study finds opioid dependence affects perception of cute images of babies

A new pilot study has found that opioid dependence - which includes dependence on drugs such as heroin - affects how 'cute' we perceive images of children to be. [More]
Scientists use computer model to explore geographical origins of influenza virus

Scientists use computer model to explore geographical origins of influenza virus

A computer model developed by scientists at the University of Chicago shows that small increases in transmission rates of the seasonal influenza A virus (H3N2) can lead to rapid evolution of new strains that spread globally through human populations. [More]
New approach could help tackle behavior change challenges across the globe

New approach could help tackle behavior change challenges across the globe

A new approach to behavior change which has been shown to successfully change hygiene, nutrition and exercise-related behaviors is described in a paper published in Health Psychology Review. [More]

Second Panel provides new recommendations to improve quality of cost-effectiveness analysis

The Second Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine reviewed the current status of the field of cost-effectiveness analysis and developed a new set of recommendations, with major changes including the recommendation to perform analyses from 2 reference case perspectives and to provide an impact inventory to clarify included consequences, according to an article appearing in the September 13 issue of JAMA. [More]
Urine sample collection: is it easy Peezy?

Urine sample collection: is it easy Peezy?

As Dr Dawn Harper, GP and star of Embarrassing Bodies, stated at the Forte Medical Forum at the Royal Society of Medicine today: current urine sample collection pots were “clearly designed by men for men”. [More]
Women find men with full beards more attractive when judging long-term relationships, study shows

Women find men with full beards more attractive when judging long-term relationships, study shows

New research suggests that women tend to find beardedness attractive when judging long-term relationships, perhaps as a signal of formidability among males and the potential to provide direct benefits, such as enhanced fertility and survival, to females. [More]
Penn researchers develop open-source software to infer evolutionary track of tumor metastasis

Penn researchers develop open-source software to infer evolutionary track of tumor metastasis

Individual cells within a tumor are not all the same. This may sound like a modern medical truism, but it wasn't very long ago that oncologists assumed that taking a single biopsy from a patient's tumor would be an accurate reflection of the physiological and genetic make-up of the entire mass. [More]
Liquid biopsies may be effective option for detecting mutations in advanced lung cancer patients

Liquid biopsies may be effective option for detecting mutations in advanced lung cancer patients

For patients with advanced lung cancer, a non-invasive liquid biopsy may be a more effective and suitable alternative to the gold standard tissue biopsy to detect clinically relevant mutations and help guide their course of treatment, suggests a new study published this week in the journal Clinical Cancer Research from researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Delirium in advanced cancer patients: an interview with Dr Knox Todd

Delirium in advanced cancer patients: an interview with Dr Knox Todd

Delirium is a terribly distressing syndrome of acute confusion. We often see it in the emergency department in older patients and in those with multiple medical problems. They may be acting strangely at home and concerned loved ones bring them to the emergency department. [More]
Cedars-Sinai researchers develop new way to identify patients at risk for aggressive prostate cancer

Cedars-Sinai researchers develop new way to identify patients at risk for aggressive prostate cancer

Scientists at Cedars-Sinai have developed a new way to identify which prostate cancer patients are likely to develop aggressive types of the disease even if their tumors at first appear to be lower risk. [More]
Caltech scientists uncover three-dimensional structure of disease-fighting protein

Caltech scientists uncover three-dimensional structure of disease-fighting protein

The polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, or pIgR, is a multitasking protein produced in the lining of mucosal surfaces, such as the intestines. It plays a pivotal role in the body's immune functions by sequestering bacteria and by assisting antibodies—large proteins that can identify and neutralize specific bacteria and viruses. [More]
Dataiku and Bioserenity team up to develop wearable device for improving epilepsy diagnosis

Dataiku and Bioserenity team up to develop wearable device for improving epilepsy diagnosis

Dataiku and Bioserenity, two European based companies, have partnered to create a wearable device which is aimed to improve the diagnosis of epilepsy. [More]
New virus discovered by SDSU researchers named influenza D

New virus discovered by SDSU researchers named influenza D

he executive committee of the International Committee of Taxonomy of Viruses approved naming a new virus, influenza D, as the South Dakota State University researchers who discovered it proposed, according to professor Feng Li. [More]
New research shows tall people better at correctly identifying target locations

New research shows tall people better at correctly identifying target locations

Tall quarterbacks might have more going for them than a clear view over the offensive line. [More]
Blood flow to the brain increased by 600% during evolution, research reveals

Blood flow to the brain increased by 600% during evolution, research reveals

In a new research collaboration between the University of Witwatersrand and the University of Adelaide, previously held views on the evolutionary development of the human brain are being challenged. [More]
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