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UAH forms new Learning and Technology Resource Center to train student nurses

UAH forms new Learning and Technology Resource Center to train student nurses

The University of Alabama in Huntsville College of Nursing has formed a new Learning and Technology Resource Center (LTRC) to consolidate its use of technology and lifelike patient simulators to train students and to further research in healthcare simulation education. [More]
Researchers reveal common features responsible for antibiotic resistance

Researchers reveal common features responsible for antibiotic resistance

Treating bacterial infections with antibiotics is becoming increasingly difficult as bacteria develop resistance not only to the antibiotics being used against them, but also to ones they have never encountered before. By analyzing genetic and phenotypic changes in antibiotic-resistant strains of E. coli, researchers at the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center in Japan have revealed a common set of features that appear to be responsible for the development of resistance to several types of antibiotics. [More]
Study provides new evidence for anti-cirrhotic effects of GENFIT's GFT505

Study provides new evidence for anti-cirrhotic effects of GENFIT's GFT505

GENFIT, a biopharmaceutical company at the forefront of developing therapeutic and diagnostic solutions in metabolic and inflammatory diseases, that notably affect the liver or the gastrointestinal system, today announces that a recent study provides new evidence for anti-cirrhotic effects of GFT505 in the context of NASH. [More]
Inspira, RowanSOM partner to provide quality behavioral health care in South Jersey area

Inspira, RowanSOM partner to provide quality behavioral health care in South Jersey area

Inspira Health Network is pleased to announce a new partnership with Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine for its behavioral health programs in Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem counties. [More]
Study: Patients with operable kidney cancers more likely to have partial nephrectomy

Study: Patients with operable kidney cancers more likely to have partial nephrectomy

Patients with operable kidney cancers were more likely to have a partial nephrectomy -- the recommended treatment for localized tumors -- when treated in hospitals that were early adopters of robotic surgery, according to a new study. [More]
Experts expose fundamental role of chaos and complexity in biological information processing

Experts expose fundamental role of chaos and complexity in biological information processing

The interdisciplinary approach to problems that till recently were addressed in the hermetic framework of distinct disciplines such as physics, informatics, biology or sociology constitutes today one of the most active and innovative areas of science, where fundamental issues meet problems of everyday concern. [More]
CWRU researchers find mechanism that enables LRAT enzyme to store vitamin A

CWRU researchers find mechanism that enables LRAT enzyme to store vitamin A

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have uncovered the mechanism that enables the enzyme Lecithin: retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) to store vitamin A — a process that is indispensable for vision. [More]
New report explores pros and cons of working with real world medical data

New report explores pros and cons of working with real world medical data

A new report by researchers at RTI Health Solutions and parent company RTI International, found that although healthcare databases have allowed for greater access to real world medical data, using databases to evaluate the safety of medical products is complex and requires careful research consideration. [More]

New case study assesses immediate, ongoing response to the 9/11 disaster

Fourteen years after the attack on the World Trade Center (WTC), a case study in the current issue of Annals of Global Health identifies several elements that have had a critical impact on the evolution of the WTC response and, directly or indirectly, on the health of the WTC-exposed population. [More]
Enzymatic activity essential for vision may provide target for drug transport

Enzymatic activity essential for vision may provide target for drug transport

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have uncovered the mechanism that enables the enzyme Lecithin: retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) to store vitamin A--a process that is indispensable for vision. [More]
Heat-shock protein 90 enables ER+ breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy

Heat-shock protein 90 enables ER+ breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy

Long known for its ability to help organisms successfully adapt to environmentally stressful conditions, the highly conserved molecular chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) also enables estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy. [More]
Findings open new avenues for research to predict risk of therapy-related AML

Findings open new avenues for research to predict risk of therapy-related AML

For a small percentage of cancer patients, treatment aimed at curing the disease leads to a form of leukemia with a poor prognosis. Conventional thinking goes that chemotherapy and radiation therapy induce a barrage of damaging genetic mutations that kill cancer cells yet inadvertently spur the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a blood cancer. [More]
Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) mobile communications: an interview with Jorge Valdes

Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) mobile communications: an interview with Jorge Valdes

Type 1 diabetes is a complex condition to manage. It requires continuous, around the clock monitoring of blood glucose levels, which change repeatedly throughout the day and night. [More]
Scientists seek to improve stem cell transplant outcomes using DNA sequencing, mathematical modeling

Scientists seek to improve stem cell transplant outcomes using DNA sequencing, mathematical modeling

Is the human immune system similar to the weather, a seemingly random yet dynamical system that can be modeled based on past conditions to predict future states? Scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center's award-winning Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) Program believe it is, and they recently published several studies that support the possibility of using next-generation DNA sequencing and mathematical modeling to not only understand the variability observed in clinical outcomes of stem cell transplantation, but also to provide a theoretical framework to make transplantation a possibility for more patients who do not have a related donor. [More]
Scientists uphold mouse model of human disease, but pinpoint vital differences in gene expression

Scientists uphold mouse model of human disease, but pinpoint vital differences in gene expression

Scientists at Penn State College of Medicine, working alongside an international team of researchers, have produced the most complete encyclopedia of functional elements in the mouse genome to date and compared it to the human genome. [More]
Fiagon's ENT Extended Instrument Set receives FDA approval

Fiagon's ENT Extended Instrument Set receives FDA approval

Fiagon AG medical technologies announced today that it received U.S. Food and Drug Administration 510(k) clearance for its ear, nose and throat (ENT) Extended Instrument Set. The clearance includes the company's tip-navigated GuideWire, PointerShell instrument adaptor and FlexTube navigated suction and irrigation. [More]
UC Berkeley scientists reveal how humans have excelled at 'relational reasoning'

UC Berkeley scientists reveal how humans have excelled at 'relational reasoning'

When it comes to getting out of a tricky situation, we humans have an evolutionary edge over other primates. Take, as a dramatic example, the Apollo 13 voyage in which engineers, against all odds, improvised a chemical filter on a lunar module to prevent carbon dioxide buildup from killing the crew. [More]
Joint therapy to counter HIV and HCV increases chance of success

Joint therapy to counter HIV and HCV increases chance of success

A Spanish researcher has collaborated on a mathematical analysis, recently published in the journal 'Science Translational Medicine', which concludes that joint therapy to counter HIV in patients who also have hepatitis C increases the chance of success in the fight against both infections. Between eight and nine million people worldwide simultaneously suffer from AIDS and hepatitis C. [More]
HIV's ability to cause AIDS is declining, finds new research

HIV's ability to cause AIDS is declining, finds new research

The rapid evolution of HIV, which has allowed the virus to develop resistance to patients' natural immunity, is at the same time slowing the virus's ability to cause AIDS, according to new research funded by the Wellcome Trust. [More]
Study paves way for further research on brain evolution

Study paves way for further research on brain evolution

The neocortex is the part of the brain that enables us to speak, dream, or think. The underlying mechanism that led to the expansion of this brain region during evolution, however, is not yet understood. A research team headed by Wieland Huttner, director at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, now reports an important finding that paves the way for further research on brain evolution: The researchers analyzed the gyrencephaly index, indicating the degree of cortical folding, of 100 mammalian brains and identified a threshold value that separates mammalian species into two distinct groups: Those above the threshold have highly folded brains, whereas those below it have only slightly folded or unfolded brains. [More]