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Researchers generate structural models for protein families with metagenomic sequences

Researchers generate structural models for protein families with metagenomic sequences

For proteins, appearance matters. These important molecules largely form a cell's structures and carry out its functions: proteins control growth and influence mobility, serve as catalysts, and transport or store other molecules. [More]
Influenza experts examine evolution of avian disease

Influenza experts examine evolution of avian disease

Few influenza viruses are as widespread and adaptable as avian influenza viruses, and scientists are not entirely sure why. [More]
Ludwig study uncovers ancient cellular response that underlies spread of aggressive skin cancer

Ludwig study uncovers ancient cellular response that underlies spread of aggressive skin cancer

Each day, more than 1,600 people die from cancer in the US, and 450 in the UK, mostly because the disease has spread beyond a stage when surgery is an effective cure and has become resistant to therapy. Despite decades of research, understanding why cancer cells become invasive has remained shrouded in mystery. [More]
Mass livestock production could lead to human pandemics, expert says

Mass livestock production could lead to human pandemics, expert says

Mass livestock production is driving molecular changes in diseases that could lead to human pandemics, according to an expert from the University of Exeter. [More]
Endogenous retroviruses may have played significant role in development of the brain

Endogenous retroviruses may have played significant role in development of the brain

Over millions of years retroviruses have been incorporated into our human DNA, where they today make up almost 10 per cent of the total genome. [More]
BMG LABTECH show off new colour scheme to be implemented on all products

BMG LABTECH show off new colour scheme to be implemented on all products

BMG LABTECH’s visual appearance is heading into a new direction. The microplate reader company launched a new corporate colour identity that will be rolled out across all products as well as external and internal communication channels in the coming weeks. [More]
Researchers develop E. coli cell line that produces large quantities of compound serine

Researchers develop E. coli cell line that produces large quantities of compound serine

If you had a company that manufactured valuable ingredients for chemicals like detergens or paint, you would probably like to produce the ingredients in large quantities, sustainably, and at a low cost. That's what researchers from The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability -- DTU Biosustain -- at DTU can now do. [More]
Researchers identify new subgroup of cervical cancers with different genetic features

Researchers identify new subgroup of cervical cancers with different genetic features

A team of University of South Carolina scientists led by Carolyn Banister and Phillip Buckhaults has identified a new subtype of cervical cancer that, like most cervical cancers, is triggered by human papillomavirus (HPV) but whose growth is not directed by the virus, suggesting that therapy targeting these tumors' distinct genomic pathways may improve patient outcomes over standard treatment. [More]
'Dementia gene' may offer protection against cognitive decline linked to parasitic diseases

'Dementia gene' may offer protection against cognitive decline linked to parasitic diseases

New research published online in The FASEB Journal, suggests that carriers of the Apolipoprotein E4 allele, which is the single strongest genetic predictor of Alzheimer's disease and is associated with cognitive decline and cardiovascular disease, may have a reduced risk of cognitive decline associated with parasitic diseases. [More]
Archaeologist discovers 800-year-old genomes from bacterial infection in Byzantine skeleton

Archaeologist discovers 800-year-old genomes from bacterial infection in Byzantine skeleton

Eight hundred years ago, in a hardscrabble farming community on the outskirts of what was once one of the fabled cities of the ancient world, Troy, a 30-year-old woman was laid to rest in a stone-lined grave. [More]

Americans have shifted to self-directed programs for long-term care

The provision of long-term care in the U.S. has shifted from what was once a predominantly institutionally based system of care to one in which recipients can increasingly receive a range of both medical and supportive services at home and in the community, according to the latest edition of The Gerontological Society of America's Public Policy & Aging Report. [More]
Retroviruses almost several hundred million years older than previously thought

Retroviruses almost several hundred million years older than previously thought

Retroviruses - the family of viruses that includes HIV - are almost half a billion years old, according to new research by scientists at Oxford University. [More]
Appendix may serve as reservoir for beneficial gut bacteria, new research suggests

Appendix may serve as reservoir for beneficial gut bacteria, new research suggests

The human appendix, a narrow pouch that projects off the cecum in the digestive system, has a notorious reputation for its tendency to become inflamed (appendicitis), often resulting in surgical removal. [More]
IRB Barcelona researchers disclose new signal involved in growth of fly wings

IRB Barcelona researchers disclose new signal involved in growth of fly wings

Many of the secrets of life, such as how we become a certain size and shape, have been uncovered in studies performed over more than 100 years and involving animal models such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. [More]
Perception can drive evolution of observable traits, study shows

Perception can drive evolution of observable traits, study shows

In an invited perspective published January 6, 2017, in Science, Hamilton Farris, PhD, Associate Professor-Research at LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence, finds that the key insight of an important study by Nachev, et al. is that perception can drive the evolution of observable traits. [More]
ESCMID grant helps young investigators to study microorganisms, find better approaches to treat infectious diseases

ESCMID grant helps young investigators to study microorganisms, find better approaches to treat infectious diseases

The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases through its annual grant programme helps young investigators pursue ground-breaking research to advance our understanding of microorganisms and find better approaches to diagnose, prevent and treat infectious diseases. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new tool to uncover molecular details of protein structure

TSRI scientists develop new tool to uncover molecular details of protein structure

Scientists on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have developed a new tool for studying the molecular details of protein structure. [More]
Persistent infection in infant reveals mutation that helps bacteria tolerate antibiotic therapy

Persistent infection in infant reveals mutation that helps bacteria tolerate antibiotic therapy

The quest to understand a prolonged infection in an infant being treated for leukemia has led to the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital discovery of a mutation that allows bacteria to tolerate normally effective antibiotic therapy. The report appears today in the scientific journal mBio. [More]
Study examines how ApoE gene may function differently in infectious environment

Study examines how ApoE gene may function differently in infectious environment

You've likely heard about being in the right place at the wrong time, but what about having the right genes in the wrong environment? In other words, could a genetic mutation (or allele) that puts populations at risk for illnesses in one environmental setting manifest itself in positive ways in a different setting? [More]
Massive sequencing and coevolution unveils secrets of human protein interactions

Massive sequencing and coevolution unveils secrets of human protein interactions

Cells operate like an incredibly well-synchronized orchestra of molecular interactions among proteins. Understanding this molecular network is essential not only to understand how an organism works but also to determine the molecular mechanisms responsible for a multitude of diseases. [More]
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