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Special issue of Technology and Innovation includes articles from Patents for Humanity winners

Special issue of Technology and Innovation includes articles from Patents for Humanity winners

The current special issue of Technology and Innovation, is devoted to patents that benefit people around the world who live with limited resources, in challenging environments, and are in need of better access to basic needs and improved standards of living, health and infrastructure. [More]
Neurocrine Biosciences' NBI-98854 drug gets breakthrough designation for tardive dyskinesia

Neurocrine Biosciences' NBI-98854 drug gets breakthrough designation for tardive dyskinesia

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation for its Vesicular Monoamine Transporter 2 inhibitor, NBI-98854, in tardive dyskinesia. [More]
Genetic differences contribute to risk for autism

Genetic differences contribute to risk for autism

Small differences in as many as a thousand genes contribute to risk for autism, according to a study led by Mount Sinai researchers and the Autism Sequencing Consortium, and published today in the journal Nature. [More]
Dartmouth College reveals first-ever sensor that detects secondhand smoke in real time

Dartmouth College reveals first-ever sensor that detects secondhand smoke in real time

Dartmouth College researchers are going to market with the first-ever sensor that detects secondhand and thirdhand tobacco and marijuana smoke in real time. [More]
Research breakthroughs may pave way for new drugs to fight against parasitic worm infections

Research breakthroughs may pave way for new drugs to fight against parasitic worm infections

Recent breakthroughs may pave the way for vaccines and new drugs for those infected by parasitic helminths. These flatworms, including tapeworms that cause hydatid diseases and neurocysticercosis, liver flukes, and blood flukes (schistosomes), infect more than 300 million people and cause approximately four million disability-adjusted life years lost due to chronic illness and death each year. [More]
UT Southwestern assistant professor named Moore Investigator in Data-Driven Discovery

UT Southwestern assistant professor named Moore Investigator in Data-Driven Discovery

Dr. Kimberly Reynolds, Assistant Professor in the Cecil H. and Ida Green Comprehensive Center for Molecular, Computational, and Systems Biology and in the Department of Biophysics at UT Southwestern Medical Center, has been named one of 14 Moore Investigators in Data-Driven Discovery. [More]
Rewriting the family history of Ebola

Rewriting the family history of Ebola

The research shows that filoviruses — a family to which Ebola and its similarly lethal relative, Marburg, belong — are at least 16-23 million years old. [More]
WHO holds meeting to discuss on how to fast track testing, deployment of Ebola vaccines

WHO holds meeting to discuss on how to fast track testing, deployment of Ebola vaccines

WHO convened a meeting with high-ranking government representatives from Ebola-affected countries and development partners, civil society, regulatory agencies, vaccine manufacturers and funding agencies yesterday to discuss and agree on how to fast track testing and deployment of vaccines in sufficient numbers to impact the Ebola epidemic. [More]
Study on blind cave fish could reveal mechanisms behind eye disease, other human ailments

Study on blind cave fish could reveal mechanisms behind eye disease, other human ailments

Blind cave fish may not be the first thing that comes to mind when it comes to understanding human sight, but recent research indicates they may have quite a bit to teach us about the causes of many human ailments, including those that result in loss of sight. [More]
Study outlines how unique pathogen uses the release of ROS as signal to infect healthy people

Study outlines how unique pathogen uses the release of ROS as signal to infect healthy people

New research into a rare pathogen has shown how a unique evolutionary trait allows it to infect even the healthiest of hosts through a smart solution to the body's immune response against it. [More]
IU Bloomington biologists to receive funding from NSF’s Dimensions of Biodiversity Program

IU Bloomington biologists to receive funding from NSF’s Dimensions of Biodiversity Program

Indiana University Bloomington biologists who specialize in the ecology and evolution of microbes have been named one of 12 teams in the nation to receive funding from the National Science Foundation's Dimensions of Biodiversity Program. [More]

Highland completes US$25 million offering of Class A Common Shares

Highland Therapeutics Inc., a pharmaceutical company, today announced it has completed a US$25 million offering of Class A Common Shares. The financing was led by a private equity partner that is committed to Highland's long-term success. [More]
Addressing the evolution of diversity in medical education

Addressing the evolution of diversity in medical education

A perspective piece in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine from a student at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine addresses the evolution of diversity in medical education. [More]
Quick, forceful implementation of control interventions necessary to control Ebola outbreaks

Quick, forceful implementation of control interventions necessary to control Ebola outbreaks

New Ebola research demonstrates that quick and forceful implementation of control interventions are necessary to control outbreaks and avoid far worse scenarios. [More]
NCCN publishes 20th annual editions of NCCN Guidelines for Colon and Rectal Cancers

NCCN publishes 20th annual editions of NCCN Guidelines for Colon and Rectal Cancers

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network has published the 20th annual editions of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Colon and Rectal Cancers, two of the eight original NCCN Guidelines published in November 1996. [More]
New research reveals innovative way to classify severity of stroke

New research reveals innovative way to classify severity of stroke

New research conducted at the Florida State University-based National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has revealed a new, innovative way to classify the severity of a stroke, aid in diagnosis and evaluate potential treatments. [More]
Social status can impact health, happiness even among egalitarian forager-farmers

Social status can impact health, happiness even among egalitarian forager-farmers

In western society, where keeping up with the Joneses — or, better yet, surpassing them — is expected and even encouraged, status matters. So important is it that for many people, physical and emotional wellbeing are directly connected to their place in the social hierarchy. [More]
Two UCSD professors of psychiatry honored for schizophrenia research

Two UCSD professors of psychiatry honored for schizophrenia research

Two professors of psychiatry at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have been honored by the New York City-based Brain & Behavior Research Foundation for their work studying the genetics, dysfunction and treatment of schizophrenia, a chronic and severe brain disorder affecting roughly 1 percent of the general population or approximately 3 million people. [More]
GeneSolve to license its health optimization system to highly qualified doctors

GeneSolve to license its health optimization system to highly qualified doctors

GeneSolve announced today that it will begin licensing its proprietary health optimization system to a network of highly qualified doctors nationwide. [More]

Global Village Consulting renamed as Gevity Consulting

Global Village Consulting (Canada) announced today, effective immediately, it will operate under the name Gevity Consulting Inc. At the same time, the company unveiled a new logo and visual brand identity. [More]