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Humans can get better 'gas mileage' using unpowered exoskelton

Humans can get better 'gas mileage' using unpowered exoskelton

It's taken millions of years for humans to perfect the art of walking. But research results published today in the journal Nature show that humans can get better 'gas mileage' using an unpowered exoskeleton to modify the structure of their ankles. The device puts an extra spring in each human step, reducing metabolic energy consumption by 7 percent below walking in normal athletic shoes. [More]
Scientists uncover the genetic root of prostate cancer

Scientists uncover the genetic root of prostate cancer

Scientists have revealed the root of prostate cancers in individual men, discovering that despite huge genetic variety between tumours they also share common gene faults - insight that could offer new treatment hopes, according to research published in Nature today (Wednesday). [More]
MHIF investigator performs first atrial fibrillation ablation in U.S. using SMARTTOUCH SF catheter

MHIF investigator performs first atrial fibrillation ablation in U.S. using SMARTTOUCH SF catheter

Dr. Daniel Melby, an investigator at the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, performed the first atrial fibrillation ablation in the U.S. using Biosense Webster's new THERMOCOOL SMARTTOUCH SF contact force sensing catheter as part of an FDA regulated safety trial (SMART-SF). [More]
Neurocrine Biosciences, Mitsubishi Tanabe to develop and commercialize NBI-98854 in select Asian markets

Neurocrine Biosciences, Mitsubishi Tanabe to develop and commercialize NBI-98854 in select Asian markets

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. today announced that it has entered into an exclusive collaboration and licensing agreement for the development and commercialization of its VMAT2 inhibitor, NBI-98854, in Japan and other select Asian markets with Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation. [More]
Big data helps discover gephyrin protein's connection in human history

Big data helps discover gephyrin protein's connection in human history

Big data: It's a term we read and hear about often, but is hard to grasp. Computer scientists at Washington University in St. Louis' School of Engineering & Applied Science tackled some big data about an important protein and discovered its connection in human history as well as clues about its role in complex neurological diseases. [More]
Genes crucial for vision multiplied in early stages of vertebrate evolution

Genes crucial for vision multiplied in early stages of vertebrate evolution

A new study from SciLifeLab at Uppsala University published in PLOS ONE shows that genes crucial for vision were multiplied in the early stages of vertebrate evolution and acquired distinct functions leading to the sophisticated mechanisms of vertebrate eyes. [More]
Moffitt researchers use integrative approaches to study cancer heterogeneity

Moffitt researchers use integrative approaches to study cancer heterogeneity

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are using integrative approaches to study cancer by combining mathematical and computational modeling with experimental and clinical data. The use of integrative approaches enables scientists to study and model cancer progression in a manner that conventional experimental systems are unable to do. [More]
Iceland paint a genomic picture for an entire nation

Iceland paint a genomic picture for an entire nation

Researchers in Iceland have published the largest ever studies of whole-genome data and effectively deduced the genetic code of β€œan entire nation.” [More]
Mount Sinai researchers reprogram blood cells into iPSCs to study genetic origins of MDS

Mount Sinai researchers reprogram blood cells into iPSCs to study genetic origins of MDS

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) -- adult cells reprogrammed back to an embryonic stem cell-like state--may better model the genetic contributions to each patient's particular disease. In a process called cellular reprogramming, researchers at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have taken mature blood cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and reprogrammed them back into iPSCs to study the genetic origins of this rare blood cancer. [More]
Qualcomm Life, AMC Health to accelerate transformation of health care delivery for at-risk patients

Qualcomm Life, AMC Health to accelerate transformation of health care delivery for at-risk patients

Qualcomm Life, Inc., a subsidiary of Qualcomm Incorporated, and AMC Health, a privately held provider of 'real-time' patient management solutions, today announced a collaborative effort to accelerate the transformation of chronic care and population health management by significantly enhancing connectivity and care coordination for at-risk patients, specifically those with heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, asthma or COPD, in a cost-effective manner. [More]
GenVec reports record financial results for Q4 and fiscal year 2014

GenVec reports record financial results for Q4 and fiscal year 2014

GenVec, Inc. today reported financial results for the fourth quarter and year ended December 31, 2014. For the year ended December 31, 2014, the company reported a net loss of $2.5 million, or $0.16 per share, compared with a net loss of $10.0 million, or $0.77 per share, for the year ended December 31, 2013. [More]
Study: Progression of dysfunctional tau protein drives cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease

Study: Progression of dysfunctional tau protein drives cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease

By examining more than 3,600 postmortem brains, researchers at Mayo Clinic's campuses in Jacksonville, Florida, and Rochester, Minnesota, have found that the progression of dysfunctional tau protein drives the cognitive decline and memory loss seen in Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Using the butterfly effect to predict heart disease: an interview with Dr George and Dr Parthimos, Cardiff University

Using the butterfly effect to predict heart disease: an interview with Dr George and Dr Parthimos, Cardiff University

The emergence of the butterfly effect in many physical events reveals two fundamental laws that underpin all nonlinear systems. The first principle is known as determinism, which means that the evolution of an event can be followed accurately in the future, as long as we know its precise starting point and the rules of how a situation can change with time. [More]
Male genetic diversity declined due to wealth, power rather than `survival of fittest`

Male genetic diversity declined due to wealth, power rather than `survival of fittest`

The DNA you inherit from your parents contributes to the physical make-up of your body -- whether you have blue eyes or brown, black hair or red, or are male or female. [More]
New analysis of medieval cesspit in Jerusalem provides window into spread of infectious diseases

New analysis of medieval cesspit in Jerusalem provides window into spread of infectious diseases

A new analysis of a medieval cesspit in the Christian quarter of the old city of Jerusalem has revealed the presence of a number of ancient parasite eggs, providing a window into the nature and spread of infectious diseases in the Middle East during the 15th century. [More]
Gene regulatory code remained same across the evolution

Gene regulatory code remained same across the evolution

The language used in the switches that turn genes on and off has remained the same across millions of years of evolution, according to a new study led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. The findings, which are published in the scientific journal "eLife", indicate that the differences between animals reside in the content and length of the instructions that are written using this conserved language. [More]
Scientists discover how ALL cells mutate to survive chemotherapy

Scientists discover how ALL cells mutate to survive chemotherapy

By genomic sequencing of leukemia cells from relapsed patients at different stages, scientists have discovered key details of how acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells mutate to survive chemotherapy. These mutations enable the cells to proliferate, causing relapse and often death. [More]
Psychology study sheds new light on men's preferences for women with certain body types

Psychology study sheds new light on men's preferences for women with certain body types

A psychology study from The University of Texas at Austin sheds new light on today's standards of beauty, attributing modern men's preferences for women with a curvy backside to prehistoric influences. [More]
GenomeNext completes whole genome sequencing analysis at unprecedented 1,000 genomes per day

GenomeNext completes whole genome sequencing analysis at unprecedented 1,000 genomes per day

GenomeNext, LLC, a leader in genomic data management and integrated analysis, announced today that, through the "Intel Heads In The Clouds Challenge on Amazon Web Services" with support from JHC Technology, and in conjunction with Nationwide Children's Hospital, has benchmarked whole genome sequencing analysis at an unprecedented 1,000 genomes per day. [More]
Scientists identify how mRNA deciphers critical information within genetic code

Scientists identify how mRNA deciphers critical information within genetic code

Case Western Reserve scientists have discovered that speed matters when it comes to how messenger RNA (mRNA) deciphers critical information within the genetic code β€” the complex chain of instructions critical to sustaining life. The investigators' findings, which appear in the March 12 journal Cell, give scientists critical new information in determining how best to engage cells to treat illness β€” and, ultimately, keep them from emerging in the first place. [More]
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