Evolution News and Research RSS Feed - Evolution News and Research

Researchers find Aspergillus as interesting target for discovery of novel drugs

Researchers find Aspergillus as interesting target for discovery of novel drugs

The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus produces a group of previously unknown natural products. With reference to plant isoquinoline alkaloids, these substances have been named fumisoquins. [More]
Growing opportunities for artificial brain enhancement bring humans closer to becoming cyborgs

Growing opportunities for artificial brain enhancement bring humans closer to becoming cyborgs

Our excitement with and rapid uptake of technology - and the growing opportunities for artificial brain enhancement - are putting humans more firmly on the path to becoming cyborgs, according to evolution experts from the University of Adelaide. [More]
New tool that simulates user interaction can help develop accessible ICT applications for people with disabilities

New tool that simulates user interaction can help develop accessible ICT applications for people with disabilities

A tool developed by researchers from UPM allows us to assess usability during the design and testing process of accessible ICT-based applications. [More]
Imaging data shows brains may have capacity to reverse schizophrenia effects

Imaging data shows brains may have capacity to reverse schizophrenia effects

A team of scientists from across the globe have shown that the brains of patients with schizophrenia have the capacity to reorganize and fight the illness. This is the first time that imaging data has been used to show that our brains may have the ability to reverse the effects of schizophrenia. [More]
Increasing specific microRNA levels can restore chemotherapy sensitivity in pancreatic cancer cells

Increasing specific microRNA levels can restore chemotherapy sensitivity in pancreatic cancer cells

By increasing the level of a specific microRNA (miRNA) molecule, researchers have for the first time restored chemotherapy sensitivity in vitro to a line of human pancreatic cancer cells that had developed resistance to a common treatment drug. [More]
Salk scientists discover REV-ERBα protein that controls strength of circadian rhythm

Salk scientists discover REV-ERBα protein that controls strength of circadian rhythm

At noon every day, levels of genes and proteins throughout your body are drastically different than they are at midnight. Disruptions to this 24-hour cycle of physiological activity are why jet lag or a bad night's sleep can alter your appetite and sleep patterns for days--and even contribute to conditions like heart disease, sleep disorders and cancers. [More]
Novel method for designing geometric structures created from DNA

Novel method for designing geometric structures created from DNA

Among the valuable holdings in London's Wellcome Library is a rough pencil sketch made in 1953 by Francis Crick. The drawing is one of the first to show the double-helix structure of DNA--Nature's blueprint for the design of sea snails, human beings, and every other living form on earth. [More]
Gene mutation linked to autism plays key role in formation, maturation of synapses

Gene mutation linked to autism plays key role in formation, maturation of synapses

A new study from MIT neuroscientists reveals that a gene mutation associated with autism plays a critical role in the formation and maturation of synapses -- the connections that allow neurons to communicate with each other. [More]
Prenatal fruit consumption linked to improved cognitive development in infants

Prenatal fruit consumption linked to improved cognitive development in infants

Most people have heard the old adage "an apple a day keeps the doctor away." It's an old truth that encompasses more than just apples--eating fruit in general is well known to reduce risk for a wide variety of health conditions such as heart disease and stroke. [More]
Study provides better understanding of sequence of genetic events in colorectal cancer premalignancy

Study provides better understanding of sequence of genetic events in colorectal cancer premalignancy

Whole-exome sequencing of both colorectal adenomas (precancers often called polyps) and intestinal mucosa at risk for developing into adenomas from patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) has generated a comprehensive picture of the genomic alterations that characterize the evolution of normal mucosa to precancer. [More]
PET imaging with PiB may help in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

PET imaging with PiB may help in early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

The effort to find ways to detect and diagnose preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) has taken a big step forward with the use of positron emission tomography (PET), a "nuclear medicine" for imaging processes in the body, when PET is used with a special 'tracer' that binds to the amyloid plaques in the brain that are a characteristic cause of AD. [More]
Technical advances in neuroimaging offer new promise to clinicians

Technical advances in neuroimaging offer new promise to clinicians

The current special issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors, Volume 18, Number 1 (all open access), is devoted to the evolution of neuroimaging technology, with seven articles chronicling the latest advances in this critical area. [More]
Scientists study how viral evolution occurs

Scientists study how viral evolution occurs

Viruses evolve quickly. A small tweak to the genetic makeup of a mostly mild strain of influenza can give rise to the next pandemic. An equally small change to the same strain in a different setting can fade it into obscurity. [More]
Chloride switch controls critical step in basement membrane formation

Chloride switch controls critical step in basement membrane formation

Chloride plays a key role in the formation of the basement membrane, a suprastructure on the outside of cells that undergirds and guides the function of most of the tissues of the body. [More]
Novel strategy to predict antigenic evolution of circulating influenza viruses

Novel strategy to predict antigenic evolution of circulating influenza viruses

During the 2014-15 flu season, the poor match between the virus used to make the world's vaccine stocks and the circulating seasonal virus yielded a vaccine that was less than 20 percent effective. [More]
ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have uncovered how two enzymes, ULK1 and ULK2, which are best known for their role in the degradation and recycling of proteins, control the trafficking of specific proteins. [More]
UCL researchers identify four genes that drive shape of human noses

UCL researchers identify four genes that drive shape of human noses

Genes that drive the shape of human noses have been identified by a UCL-led study. The four genes mainly affect the width and 'pointiness' of noses which vary greatly between different populations. The new information adds to our understanding of how the human face evolved and may help contribute to forensic DNA technologies that build visual profiles based on an individual's genetic makeup. [More]
Landmark study characterizes evolution of symptoms, signs of acute HIV infection

Landmark study characterizes evolution of symptoms, signs of acute HIV infection

Acute HIV infection (AHI) contributes significantly to HIV transmission and may be important for intervention strategies seeking to reduce incidence and achieve a functional cure. [More]
First-ever clinical trial of bioabsorbable cardiovascular device in children shows promise

First-ever clinical trial of bioabsorbable cardiovascular device in children shows promise

Current cardiovascular valve or blood vessel implants are generally associated with a number of complications, have limited efficacy over time, and may necessitate repeated interventions over a patient's lifetime, especially when implanted in a young child. [More]
Ascensia Diabetes Care receives CE Mark approval for new CONTOUR™ PLUS ONE and CONTOUR™ NEXT ONE blood glucose monitoring systems

Ascensia Diabetes Care receives CE Mark approval for new CONTOUR™ PLUS ONE and CONTOUR™ NEXT ONE blood glucose monitoring systems

Ascensia Diabetes Care announced that it has received CE Mark (Conformité Européenne) for the new CONTOUR™ NEXT ONE and CONTOUR™ PLUS ONE blood glucose monitoring systems, the next exciting development in the evolution of self-monitoring of blood glucose for people with diabetes. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement