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Researchers have sequenced genetic material from caries bacterium for the first time

Researchers have sequenced genetic material from caries bacterium for the first time

Streptococcus mutans, one of the principal bacteria that cause dental caries, has increased the change in its genetic material over time, possibly coinciding with dietary change linked to the expansion of humanity. [More]
New insights into biology of bread wheat genome

New insights into biology of bread wheat genome

Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is the most widely cultivated cereal crop in the world and provides 20 percent of the food calories consumed by humans. [More]
Unnatural DNA bases: an interview with Professor Floyd E. Romesberg, The Scripps Research Institute

Unnatural DNA bases: an interview with Professor Floyd E. Romesberg, The Scripps Research Institute

The natural DNA bases that form the letters of DNA are usually referred to as G, C, A, and T. Those are only the first letters of the chemical names. They’re often called nucleotides by their scientific name and all of them have in common a phosphate part, a sugar part and a nucleobase part. [More]
Study of woodrats may impact farming practices in arid regions

Study of woodrats may impact farming practices in arid regions

Woodrats lost their ability to eat toxic creosote bushes after antibiotics killed their gut microbes. Woodrats that never ate the plants were able to do so after receiving fecal transplants with microbes from creosote-eaters, University of Utah biologists found. [More]
Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset - the first sequence of a New World Monkey - providing new information about the marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system, physiology and growth, shedding new light on primate biology and evolution. [More]
IWGSC publishes draft sequence of bread wheat genome

IWGSC publishes draft sequence of bread wheat genome

The International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC) published today in the international journal Science a draft sequence of the bread wheat genome. [More]
Starvation can affect health of descendants of famished individuals

Starvation can affect health of descendants of famished individuals

Evidence from human famines and animal studies suggests that starvation can affect the health of descendants of famished individuals. But how such an acquired trait might be transmitted from one generation to the next has not been clear. [More]
Study finds that friends who are not biologically related still resemble each other genetically

Study finds that friends who are not biologically related still resemble each other genetically

If you consider your friends family, you may be on to something. A study from the University of California, San Diego, and Yale University finds that friends who are not biologically related still resemble each other genetically. [More]
Cryptococcus gattii evolves as it spreads to temperate climates

Cryptococcus gattii evolves as it spreads to temperate climates

Cryptococcus gattii, a virulent fungus that has invaded the Pacific Northwest is highly adaptive and warrants global "public health vigilance," according to a study by an international team led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute. [More]
Researchers recover genome of bacterium from 700-year-old skeleton

Researchers recover genome of bacterium from 700-year-old skeleton

European researchers have recovered a genome of the bacterium Brucella melitensis from a 700-year-old skeleton found in the ruins of a Medieval Italian village. [More]
New theory of how cancer works could lead to next generation of treatments of disease

New theory of how cancer works could lead to next generation of treatments of disease

A new theory of how cancer works could lead to the next generation of treatments of the disease. The theory suggests that cancer forms when recently evolved genes are damaged, and cells have to revert to using older, inappropriate genetic pathways. [More]
Research roundup: Clinics and electronic records; young adults baffled by exchange; Medicare spending slowdown

Research roundup: Clinics and electronic records; young adults baffled by exchange; Medicare spending slowdown

We found that in 2012 nine out of ten health centers had adopted a EHR system, and half had adopted EHRs with basic capabilities. Seven in ten health centers reported that their providers were receiving meaningful-use incentive payments from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). [More]
Expectant moms use Internet to seek pregnancy advice

Expectant moms use Internet to seek pregnancy advice

Pregnant women are using the Internet to seek answers to their medical questions more often than they would like, say Penn State researchers. [More]
Researchers develop new way to identify potential therapeutic targets for drug resistant melanoma

Researchers develop new way to identify potential therapeutic targets for drug resistant melanoma

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers developed a new way to identify possible therapeutic targets for patients with drug resistant melanoma. It involves using liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry to measure biomarkers or molecules in blood and tissue that indicates cancer is present. These measurements can help researchers determine if a patient is responding to treatment. [More]
Bacteria can survive under antibiotic exposure by developing a biological timer

Bacteria can survive under antibiotic exposure by developing a biological timer

Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers showed that when exposed to repeated cycles of antibiotics, bacteria evolved a new adaptation by remaining dormant for the treatment period. The results show for the first time that bacteria can develop a biological timer to survive under antibiotic exposure. [More]
GSMA announces mobile ecosystem partnership to provide mHealth services to women, children

GSMA announces mobile ecosystem partnership to provide mHealth services to women, children

The GSMA today announced that its Mobile for Development mHealth programme has launched a new cross-ecosystem partnership designed to provide a range of mHealth services to women and children, with a particular focus on nutrition, across Sub-Saharan Africa. [More]
UK's TSB provides £347,000 for project to optimise gene library assembly technology

UK's TSB provides £347,000 for project to optimise gene library assembly technology

Today, Monday 30th June, 2014, Isogenica, Cambridge UK and Imperial College London secure funding from the Technology Strategy Board (TSB), the UK's innovation agency, for a £347,000 project to optimise a gene library assembly technology for potential use in synthetic biology. [More]
Gene study reveals the root of language development in humans

Gene study reveals the root of language development in humans

The evolution of language in humans continues to perplex scientists and linguists who study how humans learn to communicate. [More]
Sociologists to discuss economic inequality at ASA's Annual Meeting in San Francisco

Sociologists to discuss economic inequality at ASA's Annual Meeting in San Francisco

More than 5,000 sociologists will convene in San Francisco this August to explore ideas and scientific research relating to economic inequality and many other topics, as part of the American Sociological Association's 109th Annual Meeting. This year's theme, "Hard Times: The Impact of Economic Inequality on Families and Individuals," draws attention to the many ways in which inequality reverberates throughout American society and the world. [More]
Personalized antibiotic therapy can help fight antibiotic-resistant infections

Personalized antibiotic therapy can help fight antibiotic-resistant infections

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned last fall that the U.S. faces "potentially catastrophic consequences" if it doesn't act quickly to combat the growing threat of antibiotic-resistant infections, which kill about 23,000 Americans a year. [More]