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Environmental factors promote genetic mutations, have underappreciated effect on disease, evolution

Environmental factors promote genetic mutations, have underappreciated effect on disease, evolution

Washington State University researchers say environmental factors are having an underappreciated effect on the course of disease and evolution by prompting genetic mutations through epigenetics, a process by which genes are turned on and off independent of an organism's DNA sequence. [More]
Researchers reconstruct ancient virus to improve gene therapy

Researchers reconstruct ancient virus to improve gene therapy

Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Schepens Eye Research Institute have reconstructed an ancient virus that is highly effective at delivering gene therapies to the liver, muscle, and retina. This discovery, published July 30 in Cell Reports, could potentially be used to design gene therapies that are not only safer and more potent than therapies currently available, but may also help a greater number of patients. [More]
IU scientists find evidence that invisible war between microorganisms may affect human health

IU scientists find evidence that invisible war between microorganisms may affect human health

Health experts have warned for years that the overuse of antibiotics is creating "superbugs" able to resist drugs treating infection. [More]
Study shows how genetic changes lead to differences in form and function of species

Study shows how genetic changes lead to differences in form and function of species

Ten thousand years ago, a golden grain got naked, brought people together and grew to become one of the top agricultural commodities on the planet. [More]
Innovative course helps make medical students more confident about dealing with health disparities

Innovative course helps make medical students more confident about dealing with health disparities

An innovative three-month elective course has helped make some first-year medical students at Albert Einstein College of Medicine more confident about dealing with health disparities they'll likely encounter as physicians, according to a follow-up study published online today in the journal Academic Medicine. [More]
Understanding the workings of error correction mechanism in cell division

Understanding the workings of error correction mechanism in cell division

Cell biologists led by Thomas Maresca at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with collaborators elsewhere, report an advance in understanding the workings of an error correction mechanism that helps cells detect and correct mistakes in cell division early enough to prevent chromosome mis-segregation and aneuploidy, that is, having too many or too few chromosomes. [More]
New finding could help change pharmaceutical treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

New finding could help change pharmaceutical treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

Diseases like Alzheimer's are caused when proteins aggregate and clump together. In a world first, EPFL scientists have successfully distinguished between the disease-causing aggregation forms of proteins. [More]
Study findings could lead to new ways to tailor therapies for cancer

Study findings could lead to new ways to tailor therapies for cancer

By studying the yeast used in beer- and bread-making, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have uncovered the mechanism by which ancient proteins repair DNA damage and how their dysfunction could lead to the development of tumors. [More]
Innovative new devices that facilitate IA treatment improve outcomes, decrease mortality rates

Innovative new devices that facilitate IA treatment improve outcomes, decrease mortality rates

In the last decade, Intra-Arterial (IA) stroke therapy (a technique in which thrombolytic agents and devices are passed through the arteries directly to the clot site) has gained notable momentum as an effective and safe treatment option for patients. [More]
Recipients of GSA poster awards announced at 20th International C. elegans Meeting

Recipients of GSA poster awards announced at 20th International C. elegans Meeting

The Genetics Society of America and the C. elegans research community are pleased to announce the recipients of the GSA poster awards at the 20th International C. elegans Meeting, which took place at the University of California, Los Angeles, June 24-28, 2015. [More]

UO researchers to examine effects of climate change on indoor air quality

University of Oregon researchers and industry partners are exploring how indoor home microbial environments change -- and what that means to human health -- when whole-house weatherization projects are implemented. [More]
Necrotising autoimmune myopathy requires early, aggressive treatment

Necrotising autoimmune myopathy requires early, aggressive treatment

Researchers call for the prompt recognition of necrotising autoimmune myopathy and aggressive early treatment with a combination of intravenous immune globulin, corticosteroids and a steroid-sparing agent for 3 months. [More]
MSU scientists suggest that common glaucoma medication could be used to treat TB

MSU scientists suggest that common glaucoma medication could be used to treat TB

A new discovery by Michigan State University scientists suggests that a common medication used to treat glaucoma could also be used to treat tuberculosis, even the drug-resistant kind. [More]
Scientists discover genetic markers for mosquito resistance to insecticides

Scientists discover genetic markers for mosquito resistance to insecticides

Controlling mosquitoes that carry human diseases is a global health challenge as their ability to resist insecticides now threatens efforts to prevent epidemics. Scientists from the CNRS, IRD, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université Joseph Fourier in Grenoble and Institut Pasteur in French Guiana have identified new genetic markers for mosquito resistance to insecticides, which could improve its detection in the field. [More]
Deep Genomics set to bring the power of deep learning technologies to genomics

Deep Genomics set to bring the power of deep learning technologies to genomics

Evolution has altered the human genome over hundreds of thousands of years -- and now humans can do it in a matter of months. [More]

Direct Relief honored with Esri's Special Achievement in GIS Award

Direct Relief was honored by Esri today with a Special Achievement in GIS Award for its role in developing map applications for the One-Million Community Health Workers campaign (1mCHW), a joint initiative of the Sustainable Development Solutions Network and the Earth Institute at Columbia University. [More]
Late- and post-menopausal women have more fat around hearts compared to pre-menopausal counterparts

Late- and post-menopausal women have more fat around hearts compared to pre-menopausal counterparts

Late- and post-menopausal women have significantly greater volumes of fat around their hearts - a risk factor for heart disease - than their pre-menopausal counterparts, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health study has shown for the first time. [More]
New model helps to answer longstanding question in cancer science

New model helps to answer longstanding question in cancer science

A paper published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences argues against the commonly held "accumulation of mutations" model of oncogenesis in favor of a model that depends on evolutionary pressures acting on populations of cells. [More]
UChicago, Argonne National Laboratory and USF to jointly study gut microbiomes of premature infants

UChicago, Argonne National Laboratory and USF to jointly study gut microbiomes of premature infants

Scientists have suspected that this initial disruption is linked to health problems down the road—things like autism, asthma, food allergies and autoimmune diseases—but so far they only have circumstantial evidence based on case studies. [More]
Protagonist Therapeutics closes $40 million Series C financing

Protagonist Therapeutics closes $40 million Series C financing

Protagonist Therapeutics, Inc., a company developing novel, orally stable peptide therapeutics for gastrointestinal diseases and disorders, today announced the closing of a $40 million Series C financing. [More]
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