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Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Bacteria resistant to antibiotics are on the rise. There are different explanations for how resistances are transferred. Researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna found phages in chicken meat that are able to transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria. Phages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They can contribute to the spread of antimicrobial resistance. [More]
Sentara Healthcare, CipherHealth partner to improve quality of care for patients

Sentara Healthcare, CipherHealth partner to improve quality of care for patients

Sentara Healthcare is partnering with CipherHealth to implement a new software technology aimed at modernizing the rounding process to deliver improved quality of care and satisfaction among patients and staff. [More]
New study reveals that 'imperfect drug penetration' can accelerate pathogens' resistance

New study reveals that 'imperfect drug penetration' can accelerate pathogens' resistance

Prescribing patients two or more drugs that do not reach the same parts of the body could accelerate a pathogen's resistance to all of the drugs being used in treatment, according to a new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
New genomics laboratory in Liberia enables scientists to monitor genetic changes in Ebola virus

New genomics laboratory in Liberia enables scientists to monitor genetic changes in Ebola virus

Army scientists working to support the Ebola virus outbreak response in West Africa have established the first genomic surveillance capability in Liberia, enabling them to monitor genetic changes in the virus within one week of sample collection. An article describing their work was recently published ahead of print in the online edition of Emerging Infectious Diseases. [More]
Gadusol compound can provide a systemic sunscreen to humans

Gadusol compound can provide a systemic sunscreen to humans

Researchers have discovered why many animal species can spend their whole lives outdoors with no apparent concern about high levels of solar exposure: they make their own sunscreen. [More]
Historic mining pollution in south west England reduces genetic diversity of brown trout

Historic mining pollution in south west England reduces genetic diversity of brown trout

Pollution from historic mining activities in south west England has led to a reduction in genetic diversity of brown trout according to new research from the University of Exeter. [More]
Experts to discuss impact of telemedicine on care delivery for aging Americans at d.health Summit

Experts to discuss impact of telemedicine on care delivery for aging Americans at d.health Summit

Recent technological, legal, and clinical developments are leading to dramatic changes in the ways medical care is delivered. While this shift has the power to displace many well-established healthcare players, it also presents an opportunity to form new partnerships and business alliances among industry leaders and newcomers to improve and enhance healthcare delivery. [More]
Southern Indiana to be oasis free from Lyme disease, finds Indiana University researcher

Southern Indiana to be oasis free from Lyme disease, finds Indiana University researcher

Over nearly 15 years spent studying ticks, Indiana University's Keith Clay has found southern Indiana to be an oasis free from Lyme disease, the condition most associated with these arachnids that are the second most common parasitic disease vector on Earth. [More]
Salk discovery may offer new avenues for generating novel therapies

Salk discovery may offer new avenues for generating novel therapies

Scientists at the Salk Institute have discovered a novel type of pluripotent stem cell--cells capable of developing into any type of tissue--whose identity is tied to their location in a developing embryo. This contrasts with stem cells traditionally used in scientific study, which are characterized by their time-related stage of development. [More]
St. Jude scientists develop new computer tool to find DNA duplications and deletions in tumors

St. Jude scientists develop new computer tool to find DNA duplications and deletions in tumors

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have developed a significantly better computer tool for finding genetic alterations that play an important role in many cancers but were difficult to identify with whole-genome sequencing. [More]
Neurocrine reports net loss of $1.2 million for first quarter 2015

Neurocrine reports net loss of $1.2 million for first quarter 2015

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. today announced its financial results for the quarter ended March 31, 2015. For the first quarter of 2015, the Company reported a net loss of $1.2 million, or $0.01 loss per share, compared to a net loss of $11.8 million, or $0.17 loss per share, for the same period in 2014. [More]
Long-term survivors of esophageal cancer still face continued risks, study finds

Long-term survivors of esophageal cancer still face continued risks, study finds

Patients with esophageal cancer who survive 5 years after undergoing surgery might breathe a sigh of relief and become complacent about continued monitoring. In fact, there is little published information on the outcome of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (LAEC) who survive beyond the 5-year mark. [More]
Lung volume reduction surgery could improve lung function in emphysema patients

Lung volume reduction surgery could improve lung function in emphysema patients

Emphysema is a chronic, progressive, obstructive lung disease in which the small sacs of the lung (alveoli) are destroyed, leading to air pockets and severe breathing difficulties. In 2011, 4.7 million Americans reported being diagnosed with emphysema, and in 2013 more than 8200 patients died from emphysema. [More]
CANCER-ID consortium aims to set up standard procedures for clinical validation of blood-based biomarkers

CANCER-ID consortium aims to set up standard procedures for clinical validation of blood-based biomarkers

Blood-based biomarkers such as circulating tumor cells (CTCs), circulating free DNA (cfDNA), circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are potential indicators for the tumor burden of patients living with cancer. [More]

Innovative human hunting weapons not behind the demise of Neanderthals, study finds

The demise of Neanderthals may have nothing to do with innovative hunting weapons carried by humans from west Asia, according to a new study published in the Journal of Human Evolution. The researchers, from Nagoya University and The University of Tokyo, Japan, say their findings mean that we may need to rethink the reasons humans survived Neanderthals - and that we may not have behaved as differently as we thought. [More]
McMaster researchers explore how surgeon's experience influences choice of surgery for patients

McMaster researchers explore how surgeon's experience influences choice of surgery for patients

Researchers at McMaster University (Hamilton, ON) explored whether a surgeon's expertise influences procedural choice. The results of a new study of more than 8000 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing surgical resection by 124 physicians showed that surgeons who perform more surgeries are less likely to perform high-risk pneumonectomies. Christian J. Finley, MD, MPH, will be presenting the results of this research at the 95th AATS Annual Meeting in Seattle, WA on April 28, 2015. [More]
Innovative, active post-discharge intervention program benefits thoracic surgery patients

Innovative, active post-discharge intervention program benefits thoracic surgery patients

Post-surgical hospital readmission after discharge and repeat emergency room (ER) visits are not unusual for patients who have undergone major thoracic surgery. Recognizing this problem, clinicians at McMaster University have implemented an innovative, active post-discharge intervention for thoracic surgery patients that is based on the principle of a "one team-one approach" that is initiated while the patient is still hospitalized. [More]
Lung cancer surgery patients at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism

Lung cancer surgery patients at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism

New evidence suggests that lung cancer surgery patients are at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), than previously thought, with elevated risks of complications or death. When thromboemboli occur, they may be asymptomatic or attributed to post-surgical pain or complications, and may reflect both the lung cancer itself as well as compromised lung function after surgery. [More]
Young age and small body weight predispose pediatric CHD patients toward re-intervention

Young age and small body weight predispose pediatric CHD patients toward re-intervention

A retrospective review of 633 adults and children who underwent bioprosthetic pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) for congenital heart disease between 1996 and 2014 indicated that the risk of re-intervention was five times greater for children than adults, with the likelihood of re-intervention decreasing by 10% for each increasing year of age at surgery. [More]
Study shows link between upright locomotion and spinal health

Study shows link between upright locomotion and spinal health

A Simon Fraser University researcher has uncovered what may be the first quantified evidence demonstrating a relationship between upright locomotion and spinal health. [More]
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