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Regorafenib drug improves survival rates in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

Regorafenib drug improves survival rates in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

Oral multikinase inhibitor regorafenib achieves significantly improved survival rates compared to placebo in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, according to data from the phase III RESORCE trial, presented at the ESMO 18th World Congress of Gastrointestinal Cancer in Barcelona, Spain. [More]
Study highlights continuing problem of MSI in Gulf War veterans

Study highlights continuing problem of MSI in Gulf War veterans

Veterans of the Gulf War are more than twice as likely to have medically unexplained symptoms known as "multisymptom illness" (MSI), compared to Iraq/Afghanistan War veterans, according to an updated research review in the July Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. [More]
Epclusa drug receives FDA approval for treating adult patients with chronic HCV

Epclusa drug receives FDA approval for treating adult patients with chronic HCV

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Epclusa to treat adult patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) both with and without cirrhosis (advanced liver disease). [More]
Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Why does appetite loss occur during illness? An interview with Prof. Conti and Prof. Francesconi

Appetite, as a word, come from the Latin appetitus, meaning "desire for.” Therefore, appetite can be defined as a pleasurable sensation or the desire to eat. This sensation is coordinated by several brain areas associated with reward processing such amygdala, hippocampus, ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens and striatum, and others. [More]
The scent dogs smell on diabetics’ breath could offer key to new tests

The scent dogs smell on diabetics’ breath could offer key to new tests

An increase in the level of the chemical isoprene may be the warning sign some dogs can detect in the breath of patients with type 1 diabetes who are reaching risky low levels of blood sugar, according to research by the University of Cambridge. [More]
Scientists detect biological markers of chronic fatigue syndrome in gut bacteria

Scientists detect biological markers of chronic fatigue syndrome in gut bacteria

Physicians have been mystified by chronic fatigue syndrome, a condition where normal exertion leads to debilitating fatigue that isn't alleviated by rest. There are no known triggers, and diagnosis requires lengthy tests administered by an expert. [More]
Stony Brook researcher receives grant to evaluate daily activity levels, heart rate patterns of CFS patients

Stony Brook researcher receives grant to evaluate daily activity levels, heart rate patterns of CFS patients

By better understanding daily activity levels and heart rate patterns of those who suffer from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), scientists hope to discover more about this complex illness condition. [More]
New study reveals conversion of oral cannabidiol to THC by acidic fluids in the stomach

New study reveals conversion of oral cannabidiol to THC by acidic fluids in the stomach

A new study demonstrating the conversion of oral cannabidiol (CBD) to the psychoactive component tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in the presence of gastric fluids could explain why children given CBD to treat epilepsy had an unexpectedly high rate of adverse effects such as sleepiness and fatigue. [More]
Long-term opioid therapy may not be effective to manage pain in sickle cell disease patients

Long-term opioid therapy may not be effective to manage pain in sickle cell disease patients

In a small study looking at pain assessments in adults with sickle cell disease, researchers at Johns Hopkins says overall, those treated long-term with opioids often fared worse in measures of pain, fatigue and curtailed daily activities than those not on long-term opioids. [More]
Mental fatigue can impair football performance

Mental fatigue can impair football performance

Professional footballers and their coaches often complain about the mental fatigue induced by the stress of frequent matches. [More]
Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Research published this week shows that women working long hours for many years are at increased risk of developing life-threatening illnesses. Diabetes, cancer, heart trouble and arthritis were three times more common among women who worked an average of 60 hours or more per week for 30 years compared with women working fewer hours. [More]
Researchers suggest shorter HF-WBI course as preferred option for early-stage breast cancer patients

Researchers suggest shorter HF-WBI course as preferred option for early-stage breast cancer patients

Early-stage breast cancer patients receiving a shorter course of whole breast radiation with higher radiation doses per fraction reported equivalent cosmetic, functional and pain outcomes over time as those receiving a longer, lower-dose per fraction course of treatment, according to researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Nightly fluctuations in sleep predict worse daytime mood in healthy adolescents

Nightly fluctuations in sleep predict worse daytime mood in healthy adolescents

A new study of adolescents suggests that obtaining an insufficient amount of sleep increases variability in sadness, anger, energy and feelings of sleepiness. [More]
U-M researchers explore new way to improve cognitive issues in MS patients

U-M researchers explore new way to improve cognitive issues in MS patients

Multiple sclerosis looks different from person to person. In many individuals, though, the difficulty in maintaining a sense of self and in keeping up intellectually can be the disease's most devastating manifestations. [More]
Behavioural intervention could be effective way to improve health of RA patients

Behavioural intervention could be effective way to improve health of RA patients

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed for the first time that a combination of text messages and individual counselling sessions to motivate patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) to be more active resulted in improved patient-reported clinical outcomes. [More]
Griffith researchers move one step closer to understanding cause of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Griffith researchers move one step closer to understanding cause of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

A new finding in the cause of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome has been identified by researchers at Griffith University who say they are getting much closer to a complete understanding of this disabling condition. [More]
Rehabilitation programmes can help reverse frailty in older COPD patients

Rehabilitation programmes can help reverse frailty in older COPD patients

One in four patients with COPD referred for exercise rehabilitation are frail, but nevertheless can respond favourably to rehabilitation and their frailty can be reversed, finds a new study led by King's College London and Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust. [More]
Study shows rheumatologists underestimate disease severity in OA patients

Study shows rheumatologists underestimate disease severity in OA patients

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed patients with osteoarthritis (OA) are more likely to have the impact of their condition underestimated by rheumatologists than patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). [More]
Minimal zinc deficiency can impede human and animal health

Minimal zinc deficiency can impede human and animal health

The trace element zinc has an impact on the essential metabolic functions of most living organisms. New research carried out by the Chair of Animal Nutrition at the Technical University of Munich has found that even minimal zinc deficiency impairs digestion, albeit without any typical symptoms such as skin problems or fatigue. [More]
PD surgery improves quality of life in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

PD surgery improves quality of life in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

Although surgery can prolong the lives of patients with an aggressive type of cancer called malignant pleural mesothelioma, many patients avoid the operation for fear it will degrade their quality of life. [More]
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