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Study shows maritime pine bark extract may be effective in limiting muscle loss due to aging

Study shows maritime pine bark extract may be effective in limiting muscle loss due to aging

A new peer-reviewed, published study shows French maritime pine bark extract, Pycnogenol, may be effective in curbing muscle loss that occurs with aging – a natural process that leads to sarcopenia, a common condition affecting adults as early as age 65. [More]
Study links Spring Loaded Technology’s Levitation Knee Brace to significant reduction in muscle fatigue

Study links Spring Loaded Technology’s Levitation Knee Brace to significant reduction in muscle fatigue

Spring Loaded Technology today reports the findings of a recent third-party study which links its Levitation, the world’s first compact bionic knee brace, to a significant reduction in factors that can lead to muscle fatigue. [More]
Groundbreaking research findings could lead to potential new treatments for Crohn’s disease

Groundbreaking research findings could lead to potential new treatments for Crohn’s disease

A Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine-led team of international researchers has for the first time identified a fungus as a key factor in the development of Crohn's disease. [More]
Study finds racial disparities in physical and functional quality of life for breast cancer survivors

Study finds racial disparities in physical and functional quality of life for breast cancer survivors

An analysis of the quality of life of several thousand breast cancer survivors in North Carolina found differences in how black and white women functioned and felt physically and spiritually during treatment and two years after diagnosis. [More]
Guidelines for staying healthy during flu season

Guidelines for staying healthy during flu season

The American Academy of Pediatrics updated its annual influenza (flu) season guidelines, withdrawing the child-friendly nasal flu vaccine, FluMist, this year. [More]
Create perfect bedtime routine in autumn with BetterYou transdermal magnesium, recommends sleep expert

Create perfect bedtime routine in autumn with BetterYou transdermal magnesium, recommends sleep expert

Don’t lose sleep over the clocks going back this October, instead prepare your bedtime routine with BetterYou transdermal magnesium says sleep expert. [More]
Imperfect bite linked to poor postural and balance control

Imperfect bite linked to poor postural and balance control

In recent years there has been increasing medical interest in correcting teeth that do not touch perfectly in order to prevent problems such as jaw pain, gaps between teeth and crowding. [More]
Discrimination experienced by overweight adolescents can lead to increased emotional problems

Discrimination experienced by overweight adolescents can lead to increased emotional problems

Discrimination and bullying experienced by sixth graders who are overweight leads to increased emotional problems by the end of eighth grade, according to new research published in the Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, a journal of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. [More]
Pregnant women with bipolar disorder at higher risk for developing postpartum psychosis

Pregnant women with bipolar disorder at higher risk for developing postpartum psychosis

Pregnant women with bipolar disorder and their families and physicians should be aware of a significantly higher risk for developing postpartum psychosis, according to a new Northwestern Medicine review of literature on the rare and under-researched disorder. [More]
Whole brain radiotherapy offers no quality-of-life benefit in lung cancer patients with brain metastases

Whole brain radiotherapy offers no quality-of-life benefit in lung cancer patients with brain metastases

People with the most common type of lung cancer whose disease has spread to the brain could be spared potentially harmful whole brain radiotherapy, according to new research published in The Lancet. [More]
Blood cancer treatment linked to distinct increase in molecular age of immune cells

Blood cancer treatment linked to distinct increase in molecular age of immune cells

Certain cancer treatments are known to take a toll on patients, causing side effects like fatigue, nausea and hair loss. Now, scientists are investigating whether some treatments can cause another long-term side effect: premature aging of important disease-fighting cells. [More]
New research explores challenges faced by African American breast cancer survivors

New research explores challenges faced by African American breast cancer survivors

Although there is some overlap, past research has shown that the challenges faced by African American breast cancer survivors differ somewhat from Caucasian women. [More]
Moderation and appropriate rest periods may be key to healthier CrossFit workouts

Moderation and appropriate rest periods may be key to healthier CrossFit workouts

Are you a fitness enthusiast? If so, moderation and appropriate rest periods may be the key to healthier exercise, as consecutive CrossFit-style workouts could impair the immune system by affecting inflammatory proteins. [More]
Older patients feel voiceless in decision-making process for dialysis, study finds

Older patients feel voiceless in decision-making process for dialysis, study finds

Starting dialysis treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) should be a shared decision made by an informed patient based on discussions with a physician and family members. [More]
Stand-biased classroom environments can have significant effect on BMI percentile of students

Stand-biased classroom environments can have significant effect on BMI percentile of students

Changing a classroom from standard desks to standing desks, has a significant effect on the body mass index (BMI) percentile of students, according to a study co-led by University of Louisville School of Public Health and Information Sciences researcher Monica Wendel, Dr.P.H., M.A., and her Texas A&M University collaborators. [More]
CFS possesses objectively identifiable chemical signature in men and women, study reveals

CFS possesses objectively identifiable chemical signature in men and women, study reveals

Dauer is the German word for persistence or long-lived. It is a type of stasis in the development in some invertebrates that is prompted by harsh environmental conditions. The findings are published online in the August 29 issue of PNAS. [More]
Adults with moderate to severe TBI may be at greater risk of death from unintentional injuries

Adults with moderate to severe TBI may be at greater risk of death from unintentional injuries

Research examining adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) who participated in rehabilitation showed that they were twice as likely to die from an unintentional injury that occurred following their TBI. [More]
Janssen seeks to extend DARZALEX license to benefit more multiple myeloma patients

Janssen seeks to extend DARZALEX license to benefit more multiple myeloma patients

Janssen-Cilag International NV has announced the submission of a Type II variation application to the European Medicines Agency (EMA), seeking to broaden the existing marketing authorisation for the immunotherapy DARZALEX® (daratumumab) to include treatment of adult patients with relapsed multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. The expanded indication is based on daratumumab in combination with lenalidomide (an immmunomodulatory agent) and dexamethasone, or bortezomib (a PI) and dexamethasone. [More]
Liver cancer time-bomb as up to 70% people with Hep C miss out on follow-up testing

Liver cancer time-bomb as up to 70% people with Hep C miss out on follow-up testing

Up to 70 per cent of Victorians with suspected hepatitis C may not have received follow-up testing, putting them at risk of chronic liver disease and even cancer, University of Melbourne researchers say. [More]
Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower cognitive response times, study shows

Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower cognitive response times, study shows

New research published in the UEG Journal1 has found that Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower response times than matched individuals that do not have the disease. [More]
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