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Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer has announced that a Phase III trial evaluating its oncology compound Stivarga® (regorafenib) tablets for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has met its primary endpoint of a statistically significant improvement in overall survival. The study, called RESORCE, evaluated the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with HCC whose disease has progressed after treatment with sorafenib. The safety and tolerability were generally consistent with the known profile of regorafenib. Detailed efficacy and safety analyses from this study are expected to be presented at an upcoming scientific congress. [More]
Yoga, aquatic exercise have positive influence on multiple sclerosis symptoms

Yoga, aquatic exercise have positive influence on multiple sclerosis symptoms

Exercise can have a positive influence on certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis: Patients who do yoga and aquatic exercise suffer less from fatigue, depression and paresthesia, as reported by researchers from the University of Basel and the Psychiatric University Clinics Basel in a joint study with colleagues in Iran. [More]
UGA researcher works to advance effective treatment for infectious mononucleosis

UGA researcher works to advance effective treatment for infectious mononucleosis

The University of Georgia's Mark Ebell wasn't impressed with research on infectious mononucleosis when he wrote his first published review on it back in the 1990s. He still isn't—a subject he discusses in the April issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Exercise can minimize side effects of drugs used in cancer treatment

Exercise can minimize side effects of drugs used in cancer treatment

Good nutrition and regular exercise combined are an effective way to reduce the risk of cancer and to prevent its recurrence. "This has been proven over and over," said Carol DeNysschen, associate professor and chair of the Health, Nutrition, and Dietetics Department at Buffalo State. "If we could only motivate people to eat better and move more, we'd have so much less chronic disease." [More]
Safety tips to prevent slips and falls among seniors

Safety tips to prevent slips and falls among seniors

May is National Trauma Awareness Month, and this year the American Trauma Society is raising awareness about senior safety and falls with "Safe Steps for Seniors." The Stony Brook Trauma Center is taking steps to shed light on the matter to help prevent serious injuries from occurring. [More]
Janssen gets positive CHMP opinion for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) to treat patients with previously untreated CLL

Janssen gets positive CHMP opinion for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) to treat patients with previously untreated CLL

Janssen-Cilag International NV today announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency has adopted a Positive Opinion, recommending broadening the existing marketing authorisation for ibrutinib as a single agent for the treatment of adult patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). [More]
TGen scientists trace likely origins, dispersal of fungus that causes Valley Fever

TGen scientists trace likely origins, dispersal of fungus that causes Valley Fever

Using the latest in genomic analysis technologies, scientists at the Translational Genomics Research Institute have tracked the likely origins and dispersal of the fungus that causes Valley Fever, according to a study published today in the journal mBio, the premiere journal for reporting high impact microbiological research. [More]
Series of routine tests may not be beneficial to patients with age-related disorder

Series of routine tests may not be beneficial to patients with age-related disorder

A series of tests physicians routinely order to help diagnose and follow their patients with an elevated antibody level that is a marker for cancer risk, often do not benefit the patient but do increase health care costs, pathologists report. [More]
Study highlights potential emergence of new swine flu strains

Study highlights potential emergence of new swine flu strains

The wide diversity of flu in pigs across multiple continents, mostly introduced from humans, highlights the significant potential of new swine flu strains emerging, according to a study to be published in eLife. [More]
Exposure to blue light may lead to eyestrain but does not damage retina

Exposure to blue light may lead to eyestrain but does not damage retina

Nearly 90 percent of adults use digital devices for two or more hours per day, according to The Vision Council's 2016 Digital Eye Strain Report, exposing consumers to blue light that some suggest is dangerous. [More]
Why don’t MS patients always engage with specialists? An interview with Dr Anita Rose

Why don’t MS patients always engage with specialists? An interview with Dr Anita Rose

The recent survey you ask about was conducted by the MS Trust in 2012. It revealed that nearly one fifth of respondents had seen neither an MS specialist nurse (MSSN) nor a neurologist in the past year, and so will not have received the comprehensive annual review recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). [More]
Study reveals best ways to reduce substance use among African Americans

Study reveals best ways to reduce substance use among African Americans

Cocaine use has increased substantially among African Americans in some of the most underserved areas of the United States. Interventions designed to increase connection to and support from non-drug using family and friends, with access to employment, the faith community, and education, are the best ways to reduce substance use among African Americans and other minorities in low-income, resource-poor communities, concludes a study led by a medical anthropologist at the University of California, Riverside. [More]
Imatinib-related symptom burden linked to adherence in Indian CML patients

Imatinib-related symptom burden linked to adherence in Indian CML patients

Research shows low adherence to imatinib in Indian patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia, with an association between nonadherence and worse symptom burden related to treatment. [More]
Existing cancer drugs may be able to help people with enlarged heart cells

Existing cancer drugs may be able to help people with enlarged heart cells

UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiology researchers have identified molecular ties between the growth of cancer cells and heart cells that suggest existing cancer drugs may be able to help those with enlarged heart cells -- a condition that can lead to heart attacks and stroke. [More]
LOXO-101 drug shows efficacy with tumor regression in varied types of genetically defined cancer

LOXO-101 drug shows efficacy with tumor regression in varied types of genetically defined cancer

A phase I study of the drug LOXO-101 appears to significantly reduce tumors in patients with varied types of genetically defined cancer, according to a study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Study shows safety of experimental drug guadecitabine in colorectal cancer patients

Study shows safety of experimental drug guadecitabine in colorectal cancer patients

In a small, phase I clinical trial, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers say they show for the first time that the experimental drug guadecitabine (SGI-110) is safe in combination with the chemotherapy drug irinotecan and may overcome resistance to irinotecan in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. [More]
Study shows noise impairs tactile abilities of premature babies

Study shows noise impairs tactile abilities of premature babies

Premature birth is a harsh change of environment for a baby. Until birth, the baby is confined to the mother's womb, surrounded by soft lighting and filtered noise. When infants are born, they are attacked by several visual, sound, and tactile stimulations. [More]
AbbVie's ABT-493 and ABT-530 achieve high SVR rates in GT1 chronic HCV patients who failed previous therapy with DAAs

AbbVie's ABT-493 and ABT-530 achieve high SVR rates in GT1 chronic HCV patients who failed previous therapy with DAAs

AbbVie, a global biopharmaceutical company, today announced that 91 percent (n=20/22) of genotype 1 (GT1) chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients who failed previous therapy with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) achieved SVR12 with 12 weeks of ABT-493 and ABT-530 with ribavirin (RBV) in the primary intent-to-treat analysis. [More]
VIEKIRAX and EXVIERA achieve high SVR rates in GT1 and GT4 hepatitis C virus infected patients

VIEKIRAX and EXVIERA achieve high SVR rates in GT1 and GT4 hepatitis C virus infected patients

AbbVie, a global biopharmaceutical company, today announced new real-world data showing 96 percent of genotype 1 (GT1) patients (n=486/505 assessable for analysis) and 100 percent (n=53/53) of genotype 4 (GT4) patients achieved sustained virologic response at 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12). [More]
Innate Immunotherapeutics announces clinical trial fully enrolled and receives strong interest from potential Pharma partners

Innate Immunotherapeutics announces clinical trial fully enrolled and receives strong interest from potential Pharma partners

Innate Immunotherapeutics Limited has closed enrolment into the Company's Phase 2B placebo controlled efficacy trial of MIS416 in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS). The study has exceeded the original recruitment target of 90 subjects with the successful enrolment this week of the 93rd patient. [More]
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