Fertility News and Research RSS Feed - Fertility News and Research

Thyroid disease can affect woman's reproductive health

Thyroid disease can affect woman's reproductive health

Thyroid disease can have significant effects on a woman's reproductive health and screening for women presenting with fertility problems and recurrent early pregnancy loss should be considered, suggests a new review published today (23 January) in The Obstetrician & Gynaecologist. [More]
Two new drug compounds appear to be effective in treating endometriosis

Two new drug compounds appear to be effective in treating endometriosis

Two new drug compounds - one of which has already proven useful in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis - appear to be effective in treating endometriosis, a disorder that, like MS, is driven by estrogen and inflammation, scientists report in Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Study: ICSI technique no better than conventional IVF

Study: ICSI technique no better than conventional IVF

The use of an assisted reproduction technique known as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) doubled between 1996 and 2012, although compared with conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF), use of ICSI was not associated with improved reproductive outcomes, according to a study in the January 20 issue of JAMA. [More]
FDA grants orphan drug status to NBI-77860 for treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

FDA grants orphan drug status to NBI-77860 for treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. announced today that NBI-77860, a proprietary corticotropin releasing factor 1 (CRF) receptor antagonist, has been granted orphan drug status by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) a disease that affects approximately 20,000-30,000 people in the United States. [More]
Knocking down a single gene can help stop stress from causing infertility, miscarriage

Knocking down a single gene can help stop stress from causing infertility, miscarriage

Scientists from the University of California Berkeley have discovered that by knocking down a single gene, they can stop stress from causing female infertility and miscarriage - in rats. [More]
Scientists find that blocking hormone reduces stress-induced infertility in female rats

Scientists find that blocking hormone reduces stress-induced infertility in female rats

University of California, Berkeley, scientists have discovered that chronic stress activates a hormone that reduces fertility long after the stress has ended, and that blocking this hormone returns female reproductive behavior to normal. [More]
Increased UV radiation can affect human fertility, new NTNU study finds

Increased UV radiation can affect human fertility, new NTNU study finds

A new study from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology shows that increased UV radiation can have an effect on human fertility over generations. [More]
Scientists image zinc atoms released by fertilized mammalian egg

Scientists image zinc atoms released by fertilized mammalian egg

Sparks literally fly when a sperm and an egg hit it off. The fertilized mammalian egg releases from its surface billions of zinc atoms in "zinc sparks," one wave after another, found a Northwestern University-led interdisciplinary research team that includes experts from the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. [More]
Tel Aviv University study throws spotlight on gene mutation responsible for premature ovarian failure

Tel Aviv University study throws spotlight on gene mutation responsible for premature ovarian failure

Premature ovarian failure, also known as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), affects 1% of all women worldwide. In most cases, the exact cause of the condition, which is often associated with infertility, is difficult to determine. [More]
Lilly receives FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Lilly receives FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Eli Lilly and Company has received its third U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab). [More]
Study provides rare evidence on effect of Iraq War on child marriage, early childbearing

Study provides rare evidence on effect of Iraq War on child marriage, early childbearing

A study published today is the first detailed assessment of whether the 8-year Iraq War had an effect on childbearing. The study found that before the war, from 1997 to 2003, adolescent fertility in Iraq was stable at just below 70 births per 1,000 girls aged 15-19. [More]
Many college students regard hookah smoking safer than smoking cigarettes

Many college students regard hookah smoking safer than smoking cigarettes

Despite emerging evidence otherwise, many college students consider hookah smoking safer than smoking cigarettes, reports a University of South Florida College of Public Health study published this month by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]

Teenage fertility rises by more than 30% during Iraq War

The nine-year Iraq War led to a sharp rise in teenage childbearing, according to new research published today (12 December) by the London School of Economics and Political Science. [More]
Reductions in government healthcare spending in the EU linked to increased maternal mortality rates

Reductions in government healthcare spending in the EU linked to increased maternal mortality rates

Reductions in government healthcare spending in the European Union are associated with increased maternal mortality rates, suggests a new paper published today (10 December) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. However, if skilled birth attendants are in place, the association disappears, highlighting the potential importance of maternal care, finds the research. [More]
Study links poor semen quality to higher risk of various health conditions

Study links poor semen quality to higher risk of various health conditions

A study of more than 9,000 men with fertility problems has revealed a correlation between the number of different defects in a man's semen and the likelihood that the man has other health problems. [More]
Study compares rates of clinically recorded fertility problems in women with and without celiac disease

Study compares rates of clinically recorded fertility problems in women with and without celiac disease

Women with celiac disease present with fertility problems no more often than women in the general population, according to a new study in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Interventional radiology procedure can preserve fertility, save lives of women with placenta accreta

Interventional radiology procedure can preserve fertility, save lives of women with placenta accreta

Researchers reported today on a procedure that can preserve fertility and potentially save the lives of women with a serious pregnancy complication called placenta accreta. Results of the new study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America showed that placement of balloons in the main artery of the mother's pelvis prior to a Caesarean section protects against hemorrhage and is safe for both mother and baby. [More]
Pregnant women lacking vitamin E nearly twice as likely to have miscarriage

Pregnant women lacking vitamin E nearly twice as likely to have miscarriage

Pregnant women in Bangladesh with low levels of the most common form of vitamin E are nearly twice as likely to have a miscarriage than those with adequate levels of the vitamin in their blood, according to new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. [More]
Uterine contractions have positive effect on artificial insemination

Uterine contractions have positive effect on artificial insemination

The negative impact of contractions during in vitro fertilisation is a well-known fact. What was unknown until now was the effect it had on artificial insemination. [More]
Promising molecular diagnostic approach to endometriosis

Promising molecular diagnostic approach to endometriosis

Researchers at UC San Francisco have identified patterns of genetic activity that can be used to diagnose endometriosis and its severity, a finding that may offer millions of women an alternative to surgery through a simple noninvasive procedure. [More]