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Novo Nordisk announces U.S. launch of Novoeight for people living with hemophilia A

Novo Nordisk announces U.S. launch of Novoeight for people living with hemophilia A

Novo Nordisk today announced the company will launch Novoeight (Antihemophilic Factor [Recombinant]) in the United States for people living with hemophilia A. [More]
Co-infection reduces severity of East Coast fever, can help curb human malaria

Co-infection reduces severity of East Coast fever, can help curb human malaria

When calves are infected by two parasite species at the same time, one parasite renders the other far less deadly, according to a new study published in the current journal of Science Advances. [More]
Montefiore physician offers tips for seasonal allergy sufferers

Montefiore physician offers tips for seasonal allergy sufferers

This winter was one of the coldest on record, but spring allergy season is already beginning and it's time for sufferers to start preparing now. [More]
Globavir, BioManguinhos partner to jointly evaluate PanGlob RT-PCR Dengue diagnostic assay

Globavir, BioManguinhos partner to jointly evaluate PanGlob RT-PCR Dengue diagnostic assay

Globavir Biosciences, Inc., a biotechnology company developing diagnostic and therapeutic technologies to treat infectious diseases, has announced a partnership with BioManguinhos, a division of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, for a joint evaluation of Globavir's PanGlob RT-PCR Dengue diagnostic assay. [More]
Climate change could accelerate emergence of vector-borne diseases in UK

Climate change could accelerate emergence of vector-borne diseases in UK

Climate change could accelerate the emergence of vector-borne diseases such as chikungunya, dengue fever, and West Nile virus in the UK, warn leading public health experts Dr Jolyon Medlock and Professor Steve Leach from the Emergency Response Department at Public Health England, writing in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal. [More]
Study finds no added benefit from sipuleucel-T in men with metastatic prostate cancer

Study finds no added benefit from sipuleucel-T in men with metastatic prostate cancer

Sipuleucel-T (trade name Provenge) has been approved since September 2014 for men with metastatic prostate cancer who have few or no symptoms and do not yet require chemotherapy. In the dossier assessment conducted by the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) in January 2015, no added benefit could be derived for sipuleucel-T. [More]
New pre-clinical, clinical data for IMBRUVICA to be highlighted at AACR Annual Meeting

New pre-clinical, clinical data for IMBRUVICA to be highlighted at AACR Annual Meeting

Pharmacyclics, Inc. today announced that new pre-clinical and clinical data for ibrutinib (IMBRUVICA) will be highlighted at the 2015 American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting to be held April 18 – 22, 2015, in Philadelphia, PA. [More]
Virginia Tech researchers use genome-editing method to study lethal disease-carrying animal

Virginia Tech researchers use genome-editing method to study lethal disease-carrying animal

Life science researchers at Virginia Tech have accelerated a game-changing technology that's being used to study one of the planet's most lethal disease-carrying animals. [More]
Meta-analysis finds that high dose zinc acetate lozenges may help reduce duration of cold symptoms

Meta-analysis finds that high dose zinc acetate lozenges may help reduce duration of cold symptoms

According to a meta-analysis published in BMC Family Practice, high dose zinc acetate lozenges shortened the duration of common-cold associated nasal discharge by 34%, nasal congestion by 37%, scratchy throat by 33%, and cough by 46%. [More]
Loyola's Bridget Boyd suggests ways to handle diaper rash

Loyola's Bridget Boyd suggests ways to handle diaper rash

Diaper rash may not be a serious condition, but it can be extremely painful. It is common and causes concern for many parents trying to comfort their child. [More]
United Therapeutics announces FDA approval of dinutuximab for treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics announces FDA approval of dinutuximab for treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics Corporation announced today that the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved Unituxin (dinutuximab) Injection (formerly called ch14.18), in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and 13-cis-retinoic acid (RA), for the treatment of pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma who achieve at least a partial response to prior first-line multiagent, multimodality therapy. [More]
Researchers take images of tiny molecular machine that bacteria use to infect host cells

Researchers take images of tiny molecular machine that bacteria use to infect host cells

Armed with a microscope capable of zooming in on organisms measured in billionths of a meter, scientists report they are the first to observe one of the tiny molecular machines that bacteria use to infect host cells. Findings appear in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Researchers study safety, effectiveness of experimental Ebola vaccine following high-risk exposure

Researchers study safety, effectiveness of experimental Ebola vaccine following high-risk exposure

A physician who received an experimental Ebola vaccine after experiencing a needle stick while working in an Ebola treatment unit in Sierra Leone did not develop Ebola virus infection, and there was strong Ebola-specific immune responses after the vaccination, although because of its limited use to date, the effectiveness and safety of the vaccine is not certain, according to a study appearing in JAMA. [More]
Study: Pregnant women need to avoid antibiotics to prevent asthma development in children

Study: Pregnant women need to avoid antibiotics to prevent asthma development in children

Getting sick when you're pregnant is especially difficult, but women whose children are at risk for developing asthma should avoid antibiotics, according to a new study. [More]
New article shows how marijuana can act as an allergen

New article shows how marijuana can act as an allergen

Growing up, you may have been given reasons for not smoking marijuana. What you may not have heard is that marijuana, like other pollen-bearing plants, is an allergen which can cause allergic responses. [More]
New rapid Ebola test authorized for emergency use by FDA

New rapid Ebola test authorized for emergency use by FDA

University of Texas Medical Branch researchers who helped assess the effectiveness of a new rapid test kit to diagnose Ebola learned this week it has received emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration. [More]
Dengue fever circulating in urban areas of West Africa

Dengue fever circulating in urban areas of West Africa

Misdiagnosis of febrile illnesses as malaria is a continuing problem in Africa. A new study shows that in Ghana, dengue fever is circulating in urban areas and going undiagnosed. The authors of the study hope to use the findings to launch a widespread initiative to better understand acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses in West Africa. [More]
Modified measles vaccine effective against Chikungunya virus, study finds

Modified measles vaccine effective against Chikungunya virus, study finds

A modified, conventional measles vaccine has the potential to act against the Chikungunya virus. This is the result of a study at the University Clinic for Clinical Pharmacology of the MedUni Wien (Medical University of Vienna), which has now been published in the top journal "The Lancet Infectious Diseases". [More]
Pediatric patients who receive quick antibiotics for fever, neutropenia have reduced PICU needs

Pediatric patients who receive quick antibiotics for fever, neutropenia have reduced PICU needs

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Pediatric Blood & Cancer shows that pediatric cancer patients who receive antibiotics within 60 minutes of reporting fever and showing neutropenia (low neutrophil count), go on to have decreased intensive care consultation rate and lower mortality compared with patients who receive antibiotics outside the 60-minute window. [More]
Study reveals causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children

Study reveals causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children

With the chill of winter comes a spike in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), which spreads more easily as people retreat indoors and come into close contact. The lung infection triggers persistent coughing, chest pain, fever, and difficulty breathing, and is particularly hard on the very young and the very old. In fact, pneumonia is the leading cause of hospitalization among U.S. children, with estimated medical costs of $1 billion annually. [More]
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