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Researchers uncover new pathway in the body that stimulates liver repair

Researchers uncover new pathway in the body that stimulates liver repair

A team of Michigan State University researchers, led by James Luyendyk in the College of Veterinary Medicine, has uncovered a new pathway in the body that stimulates liver repair. [More]
Study shows clinical and psychosocial consequences following survival of Ebola infection

Study shows clinical and psychosocial consequences following survival of Ebola infection

The long-term clinical and social sequelae following survival of Ebola infection are unknown. [More]
Georgia State University, GeoVax join forces to advance development of Hepatitis B therapeutic vaccine

Georgia State University, GeoVax join forces to advance development of Hepatitis B therapeutic vaccine

The Georgia State University Research Foundation has entered into a research collaboration agreement with GeoVax Labs, Inc., a Georgia-based biotechnology company developing human vaccines, to advance development of a therapeutic vaccine for treatment of chronic Hepatitis B infections. [More]
Important vaccines that should not be missed by adults, elders and pregnant women

Important vaccines that should not be missed by adults, elders and pregnant women

Vaccines are an important part of routine healthcare for adults, seniors and women who are pregnant. [More]
Ecologists reveal reasons for regional differences in Lyme disease prevalence

Ecologists reveal reasons for regional differences in Lyme disease prevalence

The ticks that transmit Lyme disease to people die of dehydration when exposed to a combination of high temperature and lowered humidity, a new USGS-led study has found. [More]
Researchers find high-resolution structure of immature Zika virus

Researchers find high-resolution structure of immature Zika virus

Researchers at Purdue University have determined the high-resolution structure of immature Zika virus, a step toward better understanding how the virus infects host cells and spreads. [More]
Socioeconomic factors in the U.S. make large-scale Zika outbreaks unlikely, new analysis suggests

Socioeconomic factors in the U.S. make large-scale Zika outbreaks unlikely, new analysis suggests

Is the United States at risk for a large-scale outbreak of Zika or other mosquito-borne disease? While climate conditions in the U.S. are increasingly favorable to mosquitos, socioeconomic factors such as access to clean water and air conditioning make large-scale outbreaks unlikely, according to new analysis of existing research--but small-scale, localized outbreaks are an ongoing concern. [More]
Continental Who's Who recognizes Stanley J. Dudrick as Pinnacle Lifetime Member in the medical field

Continental Who's Who recognizes Stanley J. Dudrick as Pinnacle Lifetime Member in the medical field

Continental Who's Who recognizes Stanley J. Dudrick, M.D., FACS, as a Pinnacle Lifetime Member in recognition of his contributions to the field of medicine. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists find link between sleep/wake cycles and core body temperature

Johns Hopkins scientists find link between sleep/wake cycles and core body temperature

A clump of just a few thousand brain cells, no bigger than a mustard seed, controls the daily ebb and flow of most bodily processes in mammals -- sleep/wake cycles, most notably. [More]
WHO’s new report reveals children, pregnant women in Africa have better access to malaria control

WHO’s new report reveals children, pregnant women in Africa have better access to malaria control

The World Health Organization’s (WHO) World Malaria Report 2016 reveals that children and pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa have greater access to effective malaria control. [More]
Danish researchers uncover bacteria’s secret code language

Danish researchers uncover bacteria’s secret code language

Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a growing global challenge. Danish researchers have now discovered that bacteria use a code language to avoid being controlled. [More]
Rice bioengineers reveal how heart valves use different strategies to handle oxygen starvation

Rice bioengineers reveal how heart valves use different strategies to handle oxygen starvation

As the valves in a heart stretch with each beat, their cells take in life-giving oxygen. But if the supply is cut off, aortic and mitral valves use different strategies to compensate, according to Rice University scientists. [More]
Texas A&M specialist explains what people need to know about mumps

Texas A&M specialist explains what people need to know about mumps

Mumps may seem like a contagion relegated to history books, but like many other diseases of the past now preventable with a vaccine, mumps has been making a resurgence. [More]
Genetic mutation may increase susceptibility to cytomegalovirus infection

Genetic mutation may increase susceptibility to cytomegalovirus infection

Experimenting with human cells and mice, Johns Hopkins researchers have found that a genetic mutation that alters a protein called NOD1 may increase susceptibility to human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. [More]
Texas A&M professor shares tips to protect infants from RSV

Texas A&M professor shares tips to protect infants from RSV

Coughing, sneezing and a runny nose: You might think it is yet another cold, but if your baby is under 2 years old, it could very well be respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). [More]
Scientists develop safe, effective vaccine for chikungunya fever from insect-specific virus

Scientists develop safe, effective vaccine for chikungunya fever from insect-specific virus

Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have developed the first vaccine for chikungunya fever made from an insect-specific virus that doesn't have any effect on people, making the vaccine safe and effective. [More]
Researchers use DNA markers to differentiate harmless species from deadly bacteria

Researchers use DNA markers to differentiate harmless species from deadly bacteria

The virulent pathogen that causes the disease tularemia, or "rabbit fever," was weaponized during past world wars and is considered a potential bioweapon. [More]
Okayama University researchers identify link between plant complex type N-glycans and hay fever

Okayama University researchers identify link between plant complex type N-glycans and hay fever

Okayama University researchers identify plants expressing substantial amounts of a nitrogen-linked polysaccharide – plant complex type N-glycans – which is linked to allergic responses in mammals, and may provide useful study models for understanding hay fever. [More]
Scientists discover mechanism that hijacks immune system's response to tuberculosis

Scientists discover mechanism that hijacks immune system's response to tuberculosis

Scientists have discovered the mechanism that hijacks the immune system's response to tuberculosis, revealing an important new drug target for the disease that kills more than 1 million people each year. [More]
ECDC report finds increasing trend of Listeria infections among elderly population

ECDC report finds increasing trend of Listeria infections among elderly population

Listeriosis affected about 2,200 people in 2015, causing 270 deaths - the highest number ever reported in the EU. [More]
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