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Fibroblasts are connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.
Low-dose chemotherapy regimens may be more effective at treating certain breast and pancreatic cancer types

Low-dose chemotherapy regimens may be more effective at treating certain breast and pancreatic cancer types

Conventional, high-dose chemotherapy treatments can cause the fibroblast cells surrounding tumors to secrete proteins that promote the tumors' recurrence in more aggressive forms, researchers at Taipei Medical University and the National Institute of Cancer Research in Taiwan and University of California, San Francisco, have discovered. [More]
Research reveals key role of fibroblasts in development of rheumatoid arthritis

Research reveals key role of fibroblasts in development of rheumatoid arthritis

A study led by researchers at the University of Birmingham reveals the key role of different types of fibroblast cells in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), opening up a new avenue for research into treatment of the disease. [More]
Omega-3 fatty acids can stimulate activation of brown and beige adipose tissues, study finds

Omega-3 fatty acids can stimulate activation of brown and beige adipose tissues, study finds

Omega-3 fatty acids are able to stimulate the activation of brown and beige adipose tissues, a discovery that would promote the development of new therapies for obesity and other metabolism diseases, according to a research study published in the journal Nature Communications under the supervision of Professor Francesc Villarroya, from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biomedicine and the Biomedical Research Center Red-Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBEROBN) of the Institute of Health Carlos III. [More]
New study identifies novel target for treatment of Graves' disease and other scarring eye conditions

New study identifies novel target for treatment of Graves' disease and other scarring eye conditions

A new class of therapies may be on the horizon for thyroid eye disease (TED) and other destructive scarring conditions. [More]
High-protein diets may help prevent chronic diseases by reducing liver fat

High-protein diets may help prevent chronic diseases by reducing liver fat

According to a new nutritional study conducted by the German Institute of Human Nutrition on individuals with type 2 diabetes, high-protein diets reduced liver fat by up to 48 percent within six weeks. It did not matter whether the diet was mainly based on plant or animal protein. [More]
New scaffold could improve outcome of periodontal regenerative surgery

New scaffold could improve outcome of periodontal regenerative surgery

A new regenerative scaffold made of biosafe collagen hydrogel and collagensponge could possess the ability of retaining fibroblastic growth factor-2 (FGF2) and stimulate the periodontal tissue regeneration, according to new research published in The Open Dentistry Journal. [More]
Research could lead to new therapeutic targets for suppressing tumor growth

Research could lead to new therapeutic targets for suppressing tumor growth

A new study has identified a mechanism used by tumors to recruit stem cells from bone and convert them into cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) that facilitate tumor progression. [More]
Study of pan-FGFR inhibitor uses mRNA in tumours to identify responders

Study of pan-FGFR inhibitor uses mRNA in tumours to identify responders

The first-in-human dose escalation study of the pan-FGFR (fibroblast growth factor receptor) inhibitor BAY 1163877 in patients with treatment-refractory locally advanced or metastatic solid tumours were reported today at the ESMO 2016 Congress in Copenhagen. [More]
New study reveals endocrine biological function of brown adipose tissue

New study reveals endocrine biological function of brown adipose tissue

Brown adipose tissue -main organ generating heat in the body- is also an endocrine organ that secretes signaling factors that activate the fat and carbohydrates metabolism. [More]
De-bookmarking could be key to better reprogramming of fibroblasts into iPS cells

De-bookmarking could be key to better reprogramming of fibroblasts into iPS cells

In reading, a bookmark tells where you stopped. Cells use bookmarks too, specific proteins that help the cell remember what collection of genes needs to be turned on again after the brief halt of gene expression during cell division. [More]
Cold plasma therapy may help treat non-healing wounds

Cold plasma therapy may help treat non-healing wounds

Russian scientists at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, the Joint Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and Gamaleya Research Centre of Epidemiology and Microbiology found that treating cells with cold plasma leads to their regeneration and rejuvenation. [More]
New stem-cell model of heart tissue unravels mechanisms linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

New stem-cell model of heart tissue unravels mechanisms linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Using advanced stem cell technology, scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have created a model of a heart condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) — an excessive thickening of the heart that is associated with a number of rare and common illnesses, some of which have a strong genetic component. [More]
Researchers reprogram skin cells from diabetic foot ulcers to generate iPSCs

Researchers reprogram skin cells from diabetic foot ulcers to generate iPSCs

The potential to use a patient's own cells to treat non-healing chronic wounds - a serious complication of diabetes - took an important step forward as researchers successfully reprogrammed skin cells taken from diabetic foot ulcers to form induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). [More]
New study shows how the body’s biological clock suppresses inflammation during night-time sleep

New study shows how the body’s biological clock suppresses inflammation during night-time sleep

New research published online in The FASEB Journal, describes a protein created by the body's "biological clock" that actively represses inflammatory pathways within the affected limbs during the night. [More]
Research shows alcohol abuse drug inhibits ocular conjunctival scarring in mouse model

Research shows alcohol abuse drug inhibits ocular conjunctival scarring in mouse model

New research from University College London, Moorfields Eye Hospital and Duke University School of Medicine has identified a gene that drives scarring, together with a rapidly translatable therapy, for the UK's most common cause of blinding conjunctivitis. [More]
New wonder compound offers strong protection against harmful effects of UVA rays

New wonder compound offers strong protection against harmful effects of UVA rays

A new wonder compound developed by University of Bath scientists in collaboration with King's College London offers unprecedented protection against the harmful effects of UVA radiation in sunlight, which include photo-ageing, cell damage and cancer. [More]
Protein present on stem cell surface can boost growth of damaged muscle tissue

Protein present on stem cell surface can boost growth of damaged muscle tissue

Johns Hopkins University biologists have found that a protein that plays a key role in the lives of stem cells can bolster the growth of damaged muscle tissue, a step that could potentially contribute to treatments for muscle degeneration caused by old age and diseases such as muscular dystrophy. [More]
Mutations in STN1 gene cause Coats plus syndrome

Mutations in STN1 gene cause Coats plus syndrome

A team of Israeli researchers has discovered that mutations in STN1, a gene that helps maintain the ends of chromosomes, cause the rare, inherited disorder Coats plus syndrome. [More]
Understanding cancer resistance in mole-rats may help advance human treatment in future

Understanding cancer resistance in mole-rats may help advance human treatment in future

Naked mole-rats (NMR) are the longest-living rodent species and exhibit 'extraordinary' resistance to cancer. Mole-rats live up to 30 years, 10 times longer than mice, and captured colonies almost never show any type of cancer. [More]
Findings may help explain why rheumatoid arthritis drugs vary in effect

Findings may help explain why rheumatoid arthritis drugs vary in effect

Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Pennsylvania and China, report that not only are there distinct differences in key cellular processes and molecular signatures between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) but, more surprisingly, there are joint-specific differences in RA. [More]
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