Flu News and Research RSS Feed - Flu News and Research

New technology may allow mass production of flu vaccines

New technology may allow mass production of flu vaccines

Vaccines to protect against an avian influenza pandemic as well as seasonal flu may be mass produced more quickly and efficiently using technology described today (Sept. 2) by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
Volatile anesthetics may combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung

Volatile anesthetics may combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung

In use for more than a century, inhaled anesthetics like nitrous oxide and halothane have made modern surgery possible. Now, in experiments in mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have added to evidence that certain so-called "volatile" anesthetics -- commonly used during surgeries -- may also possess powerful effects on the immune system that can combat viral and bacterial infections in the lung, including influenza and pneumonia. [More]
Passport Health participates in clinical study to test effects of oral typhoid vaccination

Passport Health participates in clinical study to test effects of oral typhoid vaccination

Passport Health, in partnership with vaccine manufacturer PaxVax, Inc. is participating in a clinical study to test the effects of the oral typhoid vaccination, Vivotif (Typhoid Vaccine Live Oral Ty21a). The study will look at the side effects that could occur when taking Vivotif across the range of approved potencies. [More]
Many primary care physicians overestimate their ability to assess Ebola risks in patients

Many primary care physicians overestimate their ability to assess Ebola risks in patients

While most primary care physicians responding to a survey taken in late 2014 and early 2015 expressed confidence in their ability to identify potential cases of Ebola and communicate Ebola risks to their patients, only 50 to 70 percent of them gave answers that fit with CDC guidelines when asked how they would care for hypothetical patients who might have been exposed to Ebola. [More]
Founder of ACPA discusses how patient with chronic pain can tackle their NSAID usage

Founder of ACPA discusses how patient with chronic pain can tackle their NSAID usage

When a patient with chronic pain is experiencing symptoms, relief is only thing on their mind. NSAIDs, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, can often provide that relief, however it's important to balance the potential benefits with the potential risks of these drugs. [More]
Antiviral-based therapies have potential to protect humans from deadly Ebola virus

Antiviral-based therapies have potential to protect humans from deadly Ebola virus

For the first time, UK physicians have demonstrated that antiviral-based therapies have the potential to protect humans from the deadly Ebola virus. The report, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal, describes a case-series of eight British health-care workers who were evacuated to the Royal Free Hospital in London, UK after possible accidental exposure to Ebola virus in Sierra Leone between January and March 2015. [More]
Long lasting flu vaccine using antibodies advance from TSRI and Janssen

Long lasting flu vaccine using antibodies advance from TSRI and Janssen

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson (Janssen) have found a way to induce antibodies to fight a wide range of influenza subtypes—work that could one day eliminate the need for repeated seasonal flu shots. [More]
Flu remedies can help treat E. coli bacteria

Flu remedies can help treat E. coli bacteria

If the intestinal bacteria level becomes unbalanced, it can cause diseases. Physiologists from the University of Zurich reveal how a specific carbohydrate in the intestinal mucosa heavily multiplies certain E. coli bacteria and thus causes inflammations. These could be treated with flu remedies, which opens up new therapeutic possibilities. [More]
Clementia expands enrollment to include children with FOP in ongoing Phase 2 clinical trial

Clementia expands enrollment to include children with FOP in ongoing Phase 2 clinical trial

Clementia Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the initiation of enrollment of children as young as 6 years old in the company's ongoing Phase 2 study of palovarotene for the treatment of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP). [More]
Study: Influenza vaccines offer sustained protection up to 6 months during flu season

Study: Influenza vaccines offer sustained protection up to 6 months during flu season

Individuals who received the flu vaccine were protected for up to 6 months post-vaccination, the duration of most flu seasons, according to a study presented at the 2015 International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases. [More]
New study affirms value of influenza vaccination among older people

New study affirms value of influenza vaccination among older people

A new study of the records of millions of nursing home residents affirms the value of influenza vaccination among the elderly. The Brown University analysis found that between 2000 and 2009, the better matched the vaccine was for the influenza strain going around, the fewer nursing home residents died or were hospitalized. [More]
TSRI, Janssen collaborate to find universal flu vaccine

TSRI, Janssen collaborate to find universal flu vaccine

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute and the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson have found a way to induce antibodies to fight a wide range of influenza subtypes—work that could one day eliminate the need for repeated seasonal flu shots. [More]
60P to commence Phase II clinical trial among dengue fever patients

60P to commence Phase II clinical trial among dengue fever patients

60 Degrees Pharmaceuticals, a company focused on development of therapeutics for tropical diseases, and Singapore General Hospital announced today that the Hospital has received a grant from Singapore's National Medical Research Council to support a Phase II clinical trial among dengue fever patients. [More]
H1N1 vaccine developed at UNMC to be evaluated in animal study

H1N1 vaccine developed at UNMC to be evaluated in animal study

An H1N1 vaccine developed at the University of Nebraska Medical Center will enter a definitive round of testing this month, and researchers hope to establish its ability to ward off the virus. [More]
Wearable devices or mobile apps can help track college students at risk of catching flu

Wearable devices or mobile apps can help track college students at risk of catching flu

New methods for analyzing personal health and lifestyle data captured through wearable devices or smartphone apps can help identify college students at risk of catching the flu, say researchers at Duke University and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. [More]
Early exposure to inflammatory cytokines can paralyze CD4 T cells

Early exposure to inflammatory cytokines can paralyze CD4 T cells

In a discovery that is likely to rewrite immunology text books, researchers at UC Davis have found that early exposure to inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 2, can "paralyze" CD4 T cells, immune components that help orchestrate the body's response to pathogens and other invaders. [More]
Reducing amyloid fibril levels in semen may help reduce transmission of HIV

Reducing amyloid fibril levels in semen may help reduce transmission of HIV

There may be two new ways to fight AIDS -- using a heat shock protein or a small molecule - to attack fibrils in semen associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during the initial phases of infection, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Molecular tweezer blocks HIV, breaks up proteins in semen that boost infection

Molecular tweezer blocks HIV, breaks up proteins in semen that boost infection

An unprecedented potential "molecular tweezer" called CLR01, reported in the journal eLife, not only blocks HIV and other sexually transmitted viruses, but also breaks up proteins in semen that boost infection. [More]
NanoViricides speeds up HerpeCide drug development program

NanoViricides speeds up HerpeCide drug development program

NanoViricides, Inc., a nanomedicine company developing anti-viral drugs, reports that it is accelerating its HerpeCide drug development program. [More]
Duke specialist offers infection control measures to maintain health of pro football players

Duke specialist offers infection control measures to maintain health of pro football players

Keeping any team healthy is an important and daunting challenge, but the task is amplified in the National Football League when a bug that spreads rapidly through locker rooms and training facilities can impact an entire season. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement