Flu News and Research RSS Feed - Flu News and Research

Discrimination linked to lower vaccination rates among racial/ethnic minorities

Discrimination linked to lower vaccination rates among racial/ethnic minorities

Yearly flu shots are strongly recommended for adults with certain chronic illnesses, but patients of racial/ethnic minority groups are less likely to receive them. [More]
Novel strategy to predict antigenic evolution of circulating influenza viruses

Novel strategy to predict antigenic evolution of circulating influenza viruses

During the 2014-15 flu season, the poor match between the virus used to make the world's vaccine stocks and the circulating seasonal virus yielded a vaccine that was less than 20 percent effective. [More]
Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Influenza vaccination is associated with a lower risk of dementia in patients with heart failure, according to a study in more than 20 000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr Ju-Chi Liu, director of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Taipei Medical University - Shuang Ho Hospital, in New Taipei City, Taiwan. [More]
Flu jab linked to reduced hospitalisation risk in heart failure patients

Flu jab linked to reduced hospitalisation risk in heart failure patients

The flu jab is associated with a reduced risk of hospitalisation in patients with heart failure, according to research presented today in a late breaking trial session at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure. [More]
Drug-repositioning strategy could help combat Chikungunya virus

Drug-repositioning strategy could help combat Chikungunya virus

Since 2013, the mosquito-borne Chikungunya virus has spread rapidly through South America and the Caribbean, and is now threatening Southern Europe and the southern US. [More]
Cloud-based data from EHRs can help track influenza in real time

Cloud-based data from EHRs can help track influenza in real time

Early detection and prediction of influenza outbreaks is critical to minimizing their impact. Currently, flu-like illnesses are tracked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but with a time lag of one to two weeks. [More]
Common misconception about penicillin allergies

Common misconception about penicillin allergies

It's time for your primary care check-up, and the doctor asks you to list any known drug allergies. "Penicillin," you say immediately, although you can't remember actually taking the drug or having a reaction to it—it was your parents who said so. According to a Texas A&M Health Science Center allergist, many people who believe they're allergic to this antibiotic may not actually be allergic at all. [More]
Study shows short-term statin treatment does not benefit heart surgery patients

Study shows short-term statin treatment does not benefit heart surgery patients

Giving daily doses of statins for a few days before and after heart surgery does not prevent heart muscle damage or the development of atrial fibrillation (AF), according to an international clinical trial led by the University of Oxford and funded by the British Heart Foundation. [More]
Flu vaccinations for pregnant women reduce newborn’s influenza risk during first six months of life

Flu vaccinations for pregnant women reduce newborn’s influenza risk during first six months of life

Babies whose moms get flu vaccinations while pregnant have a significantly reduced risk of acquiring influenza during their first six months of life, a new study shows, leading the authors to declare that the need for getting more pregnant women immunized is a public health priority. [More]
Study shows tropics, subtropics exhibit complex patterns of seasonal flu activity

Study shows tropics, subtropics exhibit complex patterns of seasonal flu activity

Whilst countries in the tropics and subtropics exhibit diverse patterns of seasonal flu activity, they can be grouped into eight geographical zones to optimise vaccine formulation and delivery timing, according to a study published April 27, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Siddhivinayak Hirve from the World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, and colleagues. [More]
Administering flu vaccinations in the morning could induce greater antibody responses

Administering flu vaccinations in the morning could induce greater antibody responses

New research from the University of Birmingham has shown that flu vaccinations are more effective when administered in the morning. [More]
Study highlights potential emergence of new swine flu strains

Study highlights potential emergence of new swine flu strains

The wide diversity of flu in pigs across multiple continents, mostly introduced from humans, highlights the significant potential of new swine flu strains emerging, according to a study to be published in eLife. [More]
Scientists identify transposable element in certain bird genomes

Scientists identify transposable element in certain bird genomes

In rare instances, DNA is known to have jumped from one species to another. If a parasite's DNA jumps to its host's genome, it could leave evidence of that parasitic interaction that could be found millions of years later -- a DNA 'fossil' of sorts. [More]
NPS MedicineWise reminds Australians to prevent overuse and misuse of antibiotics

NPS MedicineWise reminds Australians to prevent overuse and misuse of antibiotics

Following from last night’s Catalyst episode, ‘Antibiotic Resistance’ on ABC TV examining Australia’s profligate use of antibiotics, NPS MedicineWise is reminding Australians to preserve the miracle of antibiotics by avoiding antibiotics when they’re not needed. [More]
Scientists develop new drug for life-threatening lung disease treatment

Scientists develop new drug for life-threatening lung disease treatment

Researchers are developing a new drug to treat life-threatening lung damage and breathing problems in people with severe infections like pneumonia, those undergoing certain cancer treatments and premature infants with underdeveloped, injury prone lungs. [More]
New mouse model to aid in development of antiviral compounds, vaccines against Zika virus

New mouse model to aid in development of antiviral compounds, vaccines against Zika virus

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine have developed one of the first mouse models for the study of Zika virus. The model will allow researchers to better understand how the virus causes disease and aid in the development of antiviral compounds and vaccines. [More]
New study suggests re-evaluation of long-held method to predict effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine

New study suggests re-evaluation of long-held method to predict effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine

The long-held approach to predicting seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness may need to be revisited, new research suggests. Currently, seasonal flu vaccines are designed to induce high levels of protective antibodies against hemagglutinin (HA), a protein found on the surface of the influenza virus that enables the virus to enter a human cell and initiate infection. [More]
Genetic modification of common virus gives extra weapon to kill cancer cells

Genetic modification of common virus gives extra weapon to kill cancer cells

A common flu virus could be used to overcome patients' resistance to certain cancer drugs -- and improve how those drugs kill cancer cells, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London. [More]
Interdisciplinary researchers to explore ethical issues of pregnant women during Zika crisis

Interdisciplinary researchers to explore ethical issues of pregnant women during Zika crisis

The emerging Zika virus epidemic is bringing to light a longstanding ethical challenge in medical research: the inclusion of pregnant women. With new funding from the Wellcome Trust, an interdisciplinary team of scholars will focus on issues of ethics and research in pregnancy and women of reproductive age, beginning with the current Zika context and later expanding to general public health research. [More]
Seasonal trivalent influenza vaccination during pregnancy may guard against stillbirth

Seasonal trivalent influenza vaccination during pregnancy may guard against stillbirth

Seasonal influenza vaccination may guard against stillbirth, a new study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online suggests. Researchers in Western Australia analyzed data from nearly 60,000 births that occurred during the southern hemisphere's 2012 and 2013 seasonal influenza epidemics, and found that women who received the trivalent influenza vaccine during pregnancy were 51 percent less likely to experience a stillbirth than unvaccinated mothers. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement