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Can-Fite BioPharma's CF101Phase II/III psoriasis trial fails to meet primary endpoint

Can-Fite BioPharma's CF101Phase II/III psoriasis trial fails to meet primary endpoint

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address inflammatory and cancer diseases, announced today that its Phase II/III psoriasis trial for the Company's drug candidate CF101 did not achieve its primary endpoint. [More]
Rare genetic mutation explains why flu can kill in rare cases

Rare genetic mutation explains why flu can kill in rare cases

Nobody likes getting the flu, but for some people, fluids and rest aren't enough. A small number of children who catch the influenza virus fall so ill they end up in the hospital — perhaps needing ventilators to breathe — even while their family and friends recover easily. New research by Rockefeller University scientists, published March 26 in Science, helps explain why: a rare genetic mutation. [More]
IU researchers reveal how Toxoplasma parasites modify brain cells

IU researchers reveal how Toxoplasma parasites modify brain cells

Rodents infected with a common parasite lose their fear of cats, resulting in easy meals for the felines. Now IU School of Medicine researchers have identified a new way the parasite may modify brain cells, possibly helping explain changes in the behavior of mice -- and humans. [More]
Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Rice University bioengineers are teaming with colleagues from Baylor College of Medicine and MD Anderson Cancer Center to apply the latest techniques in tissue engineering toward the study of one of the most common and deadly human illnesses -- the stomach flu. [More]
Flu vaccine based upon four strains of inactivated influenza enhances flu protection

Flu vaccine based upon four strains of inactivated influenza enhances flu protection

A flu vaccine given just under the surface of the skin that includes four strains of inactivated influenza could be more protective than a similar flu vaccine containing only three strains, Saint Louis University research found. [More]
Brazil's first open-access research facility to be established at UNICAMP

Brazil's first open-access research facility to be established at UNICAMP

Open-access research into drug discovery has arrived in South America, with a ground-breaking collaboration between leading scientists in North America, Europe and Brazil to provide completely free and open research results to the world. [More]
Narcolepsy bears trademarks of classic autoimmune disorder

Narcolepsy bears trademarks of classic autoimmune disorder

Narcoleptics suffer from bouts of sleepiness and sleep attacks, which impair their ability to function in daily life. But the precise cause of narcolepsy has long eluded scientists, and the cure for the devastating neurological disorder afflicting an estimated three million people worldwide -- and one in 3,000 Americans -- remains at bay. [More]
Clinical study launched to evaluate effectiveness of new HCV therapy in Washington, D.C.

Clinical study launched to evaluate effectiveness of new HCV therapy in Washington, D.C.

Officials from the National Institutes of Health and the city of Washington, D.C., launched a clinical trial to examine whether primary care physicians and other health care providers, such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants, can use a new antiviral therapy as effectively as specialist physicians to treat people with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. [More]
New type of vaccine holds promise for prevention of genital herpes

New type of vaccine holds promise for prevention of genital herpes

Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have designed a new type of vaccine that could be the first-ever for preventing genital herpes--one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, affecting some 500 million people worldwide. [More]
Adults only really catch flu about twice a decade, suggests study

Adults only really catch flu about twice a decade, suggests study

Adults over the age of 30 only catch flu about twice a decade, a new study suggests. Flu-like illness can be caused by many pathogens, making it difficult to assess how often people are infected by influenza. [More]

Nova Medical Centers announces acquisition of Industrial Medicine

Occupational medicine company, Nova Medical Centers, is excited to announce the acquisition of Industrial Medicine, P.C. in Savannah, GA. [More]

Kinsa Groups launched to monitor overall health of children in U.S. public schools

Kinsa, the maker of the first FDA approved app-enabled smartphone thermometer, today announced the launch of Kinsa Groups for its iOS and Android apps. The Groups feature is currently available for public schools across the United States. With Kinsa Groups, parents can monitor the overall health at their child's school to better track, treat, and stop the spread of illness at the earliest signs of symptoms. [More]
Halyard Health's net sales increase 2% to $439 million in fourth quarter 2014

Halyard Health's net sales increase 2% to $439 million in fourth quarter 2014

Halyard Health, Inc. today reported year-end 2014 results and provided its 2015 outlook and related key planning assumptions. [More]
Life expectancy for Spaniards increases due to 'cardiovascular revolution'

Life expectancy for Spaniards increases due to 'cardiovascular revolution'

Over the last century, life expectancy for Spaniards has increased by 40 years. A study by the International University of La Rioja highlights the main cause, since 1980, as being the reduced incidence of cardiovascular diseases while other pathologies, such as mental illnesses and certain types of cancer, have been seen to rise. The authors predict that the effects of the economic recession on mortality will show up in the long-term. [More]
Kansas State researchers preparing for next potential influenza strain

Kansas State researchers preparing for next potential influenza strain

As seasonal influenza cases decrease across the United States, Kansas State University researchers are preparing for the next potential virulent strain of flu. [More]
New antibody provides 100% protection against H5N1 influenza virus in animal models

New antibody provides 100% protection against H5N1 influenza virus in animal models

Since 2003, the H5N1 influenza virus, more commonly known as the bird flu, has been responsible for the deaths of millions of chickens and ducks and has infected more than 650 people, leading to a 60 percent mortality rate for the latter. Luckily, this virus has yet to achieve human-to-human transmission, but a small number of mutations could change that, resulting in a pandemic. [More]
Study: Airport screening for disease often misses infected travellers, but can be improved

Study: Airport screening for disease often misses infected travellers, but can be improved

Scientists have shown that airport screening for disease will often miss half or more of infected travellers, but can be improved by customizing to pathogens. [More]
WHO urges affected countries to increase investment in tackling neglected tropical diseases

WHO urges affected countries to increase investment in tackling neglected tropical diseases

WHO urges affected countries to scale up their investment in tackling 17 neglected tropical diseases in order to improve the health and well-being of more than 1.5 billion people. This investment would represent as little as 0.1% of current domestic expenditure on health in affected low and middle income countries for the period 2015-2030. [More]
USPTO issues Notice of Allowance to Can-Fite BioPharma for psoriasis patent

USPTO issues Notice of Allowance to Can-Fite BioPharma for psoriasis patent

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that are being developed to treat inflammatory diseases, cancer and sexual dysfunction, announced today that it has received a Notice of Allowance from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for CF101 in the treatment of psoriasis. [More]
Report: Proposed SDGs may not achieve policy objectives without clearer, more measurable targets

Report: Proposed SDGs may not achieve policy objectives without clearer, more measurable targets

The proposed UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) - a universal set of goals to guide international development to 2030 - will struggle to achieve their stated policy objectives without clearer, more measurable targets, according to a new report released today by the International Council for Science and the International Social Science Council. [More]
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