Fluoride News and Research RSS Feed - Fluoride News and Research

Fluoride is a form of the element fluorine that helps prevent tooth decay. Fluoride may be naturally present in drinking water or may be added to it. Fluoride may also be put directly on the teeth, as a gel, toothpaste, or a rinse.
Parents need to take active role in oral health of children

Parents need to take active role in oral health of children

February is National Children's Dental Health Month, an opportunity for parents of toddlers, young children or teenagers to explore questions about keeping your child's teeth clean, your child's first dental visit or how to protect children's smiles. [More]
TSRI scientists receive $2.1 million NIH grant to create new library of drug candidates

TSRI scientists receive $2.1 million NIH grant to create new library of drug candidates

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have received a grant of more than $2.1 million from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of General Medical Sciences to create and screen a new library of drug candidates. [More]
Children at higher risk of developing cavities not getting needed preventive dental care

Children at higher risk of developing cavities not getting needed preventive dental care

A landmark study of more than 97 million dental claims, conducted by Delta Dental Plans Association, found two-thirds of children who are at higher risk of developing cavities aren't getting recommended preventive dental care. [More]
PET-MRI combination may change management of high-risk cancer patients

PET-MRI combination may change management of high-risk cancer patients

PET/CT and whole-body MRI detect extraskeletal disease that may change the management of high-risk breast and prostate cancer patients, according to a recent study reported in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. [More]
Tooth decay can be prevented without the need for traditional 'fill and drill' approach

Tooth decay can be prevented without the need for traditional 'fill and drill' approach

A University of Sydney study has revealed that tooth decay (dental caries) can be stopped, reversed, and prevented without the need for the traditional 'fill and drill' approach that has dominated dental care for decades. [More]
USC discoveries propose promising method to eliminate pain associated with tooth decay

USC discoveries propose promising method to eliminate pain associated with tooth decay

Dual discoveries at USC propose a promising method to regrow nonliving hard tissue, lessening or even eliminating pain associated with tooth decay, which the National Institutes of Health calls the most prevalent chronic disease. [More]
Brush DJ app encourages youngsters to adopt and maintain oral health care routine

Brush DJ app encourages youngsters to adopt and maintain oral health care routine

Research published in the British Dental Journal shows that Brush DJ, an app designed to encourage youngsters to adopt and maintain an effective oral health care routine using evidence-based techniques, is effective in its aims. [More]
Griffith research aims to combat tooth decay problems in Australian children

Griffith research aims to combat tooth decay problems in Australian children

Tooth decay in children is a major problem across Australia, especially so in rural, remote and Indigenous communities. Children in the Northern Peninsula Area have a particular problem partly because the plant to add fluoride to the water system is no longer in use. [More]
Survey: Over 30% of parents say their children missed school due to oral health problem

Survey: Over 30% of parents say their children missed school due to oral health problem

This past school year was a painful one for many U.S. students, according to a new survey out today from Delta Dental. The survey finds that more than 30 percent of parents said their children between the ages of six and 12 had to miss school due to an oral health problem. [More]
Imaging technique could help in diagnosis of atherosclerosis in at-risk patients

Imaging technique could help in diagnosis of atherosclerosis in at-risk patients

Researchers at the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with the University of Edinburgh, have shown how a radioactive agent developed in the 1960s to detect bone cancer can be re-purposed to highlight the build-up of unstable calcium deposits in arteries, a process that can cause heart attack and stroke. [More]
Graphene coating can help boost chemotherapy treatment

Graphene coating can help boost chemotherapy treatment

Silver is often used as a coating on medical equipment used for chemotherapy. The problem is that this silver coating can break down drugs. Now, researchers have found a graphene coating that will help boost chemotherapy's effects. [More]
New Delta Dental survey finds that 42.5% of expecting moms in U.S. skip a trip to dentist

New Delta Dental survey finds that 42.5% of expecting moms in U.S. skip a trip to dentist

Oral health may not be top of mind when preparing for a new baby, but it should be. A new survey out today from Delta Dental finds that 42.5 percent of expecting moms in the United States aren't visiting their dentist, a step that can help identify key health issues appearing specifically during pregnancy. [More]
Using graphene as alternative coating for catheters to improve chemotherapy delivery

Using graphene as alternative coating for catheters to improve chemotherapy delivery

A new study published in IOP Publishing's journal 2D Materials has proposed using graphene as an alternative coating for catheters to improve the delivery of chemotherapy drugs. [More]

New fluorescent probes detect problems related to lysosomes

Lysosomes are the garbage disposals of animal cells. As the resources are limited in cells, organic materials are broken down and recycled a lot -- and that's what lysosomes do. [More]
New research project aims to improve oral health among children

New research project aims to improve oral health among children

A new research project from the University of Copenhagen has established an effective model for the fight against the escalating burden of tooth decay among children in Asia. The model is an important tool in breaking the social inequity in oral health of children. [More]

Researchers developing new mercury-free material to treat tooth decay

Tooth decay is a serious health problem and it is often necessary to repair cavities. Today they often use a composite filling material made of acrylate compounds, as it resembles the colour of the teeth and is reasonably strong so it can handle the rigors of the powerful chewing movements. [More]
18F-fluoride PET/MR imaging could diagnose cause of foot pain better than other methods

18F-fluoride PET/MR imaging could diagnose cause of foot pain better than other methods

A single scan could diagnose the cause of foot pain better and with less radiation exposure to the patient than other methods, according to a study in the March 2015 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. [More]
Study finds link between fluoridated water and ADHD prevalence

Study finds link between fluoridated water and ADHD prevalence

"Artificial water fluoridation prevalence was significantly positively associated with ADHD prevalence," according to research published in Environmental Health (2/15), reports the Fluoride Action Network (FAN). [More]
TOSH Program aims to improve oral-systemic health

TOSH Program aims to improve oral-systemic health

Improving oral health is a leading population health goal; however, curricula preparing health professionals have a dearth of oral health content and clinical experiences. Funded by a grant from the Health Resources and Service Administration, New York University College of Nursing's Teaching Oral-Systemic Health Program is working to build interprofessional oral health workforce capacity which addresses a significant public health issue, increases oral health care access, and improves oral-systemic health across the lifespan. [More]

Virginia Tech researchers call for critical review of EPA's secondary standards for drinking water

Changes in drinking water quality in the 21st Century are coming from a myriad of circumstances, and not all are for the best. Top contenders for why water-drinking quality might become suspect to the average consumer include California's drought conditions, the technology of fracking, and the nationwide aging infrastructure of rusty, degrading pipes. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement