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Soft drink consumers exposed to unnecessary cancer risk

Soft drink consumers exposed to unnecessary cancer risk

Public health researchers have analyzed soda consumption data in order to characterize people's exposure to a potentially carcinogenic byproduct of some types of caramel color. Caramel color is a common ingredient in colas and other dark soft drinks. The results show that between 44 and 58 percent of people over the age of six typically have at least one can of soda per day, possibly more, potentially exposing them to 4-methylimidazole (4-MEI), a possible human carcinogen formed during the manufacture of some kinds of caramel color. [More]
WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

Urgent government action is needed to meet global targets to reduce the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and prevent the annual toll of 16 million people dying prematurely - before the age of 70 - from heart and lung diseases, stroke, cancer and diabetes, according to a new WHO report. [More]
Third annual Food Labs Conference to be held in conjunction with Pittcon 2015

Third annual Food Labs Conference to be held in conjunction with Pittcon 2015

The Pittcon Organizing Committee is pleased to announce the third annual Food Labs Conference, the only food conference focused on the food laboratory, will be held in conjunction with Pittcon 2015, in New Orleans, Louisiana. The co-location of the two conferences provides that the registration fee to attend the two-day Food Lab Conference, March. 9-10, will also include unlimited week long admission to the Pittcon exposition floor and technical program. [More]
New quantum mechanical computational method attains rapid simulation of complex molecular systems

New quantum mechanical computational method attains rapid simulation of complex molecular systems

Professor Stephan Irle and Yoshio Nishimoto at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM) of Nagoya University and Dr. Dmitri Fedorov of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST, Tsukuba) have developed a novel ultrafast quantum chemical method enabling rapid simulations of molecules containing more than a million atoms without detrimental loss in accuracy. [More]
New book explores convergence as key to stable global agricultural platform

New book explores convergence as key to stable global agricultural platform

A scientific text, Convergence of Food Security, Energy Security and Sustainable Agriculture, is now available through Springer Science+Business Media. [More]
Social status can impact health, happiness even among egalitarian forager-farmers

Social status can impact health, happiness even among egalitarian forager-farmers

In western society, where keeping up with the Joneses — or, better yet, surpassing them — is expected and even encouraged, status matters. So important is it that for many people, physical and emotional wellbeing are directly connected to their place in the social hierarchy. [More]
Studies detect integrons that cause resistance to various antibiotics

Studies detect integrons that cause resistance to various antibiotics

In Mexico the sale of antibiotics for human consumption is controlled to prevent misuse, although in the veterinary sector failure in the implementation of the Official Mexican Standard NOM-064-ZOO-2000, "Guidelines for veterinarian products prescription", has prompted common bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp to become resistant to regular drugs such as streptomycin, trimethoprim, ampicillin, gentamicin, and tetracycline as a result of excess drug use. [More]
New method allows chemist to use X-rays to look deep into biological samples

New method allows chemist to use X-rays to look deep into biological samples

It is seldom sufficient to read the declaration of contents if you need to know precisely what substances a product contains. [More]

Scientists map molecular olfactory signatures of individual foodstuff

How are we able to recognize foodstuffs like strawberries, coffee, barbecued meat or boiled potatoes by smell alone? Foodstuffs contain more than 10,000 different volatile substances. [More]
Food shortage will have serious implications for people and governments in the world

Food shortage will have serious implications for people and governments in the world

The world is less than 40 years away from a food shortage that will have serious implications for people and governments, according to a top scientist at the U.S. Agency for International Development. [More]
Researchers find concise information on how best to prevent soil contamination

Researchers find concise information on how best to prevent soil contamination

Consuming foods grown in urban gardens may offer a variety of health benefits, but a lack of knowledge about the soil used for planting, could pose a health threat for both consumers and gardeners. [More]
Hemp flour with decaffeinated green tea leaves could be used to develop gluten-free snack cracker

Hemp flour with decaffeinated green tea leaves could be used to develop gluten-free snack cracker

The market for gluten-free foods with functional properties is growing immensely across virtually all food categories on a global level. The need to replace wheat proteins, fibers, and minerals is very important in order to provide a better selection and more nutritious food for consumers that belong to this segment of the population. [More]
Natural low-sodium salt ingredient addresses challenges to reduce sodium in bakery products, cereals

Natural low-sodium salt ingredient addresses challenges to reduce sodium in bakery products, cereals

Salt of the Earth Ltd. introduces a novel, low-sodium sea salt ingredient to address food manufacturers' challenges to reduce sodium in bakery products, such as bread, breakfast cereals and snacks. [More]

Potential climate change can disrupt food production in the Northeastern US

If significant climate change occurs in the United States it may be necessary to change where certain foods are produced in order to meet consumer demand. [More]
iCOMOS conference to explore science behind ‘One Health’ in complex environments

iCOMOS conference to explore science behind ‘One Health’ in complex environments

The University of Minnesota will present an international conference on the science behind One Health this spring in Minneapolis. [More]
Global decision-making has disastrous effect on human health

Global decision-making has disastrous effect on human health

The organisation of political power within and between nations and citizens fails to protect the public's health, according to the findings of a new Commission from The Lancet and the University of Oslo, published today [Tuesday 11 February]. [More]
New book encourages critical thinking and effective action for future of global agrifood system

New book encourages critical thinking and effective action for future of global agrifood system

Carbon dioxide emissions from transportation, energy generation and built infrastructure may be major contributors to climate change, but they may not be the biggest ones. According to UC Santa Barbara environmental science professor David A. Cleveland, that dubious distinction could go to the agrifood system. [More]
NRP 69 aims to identify new approaches to food production

NRP 69 aims to identify new approaches to food production

Healthy food products that are produced in an environmentally-friendly manner will boost the health of the Swiss population while protecting natural resources. The National Research Programme "Healthy Nutrition and Sustainable Food Production" (NRP 69) aims to identify new approaches to food production. [More]
Biocides used in food industry at sublethal doses may be endangering public health

Biocides used in food industry at sublethal doses may be endangering public health

Biocides used in the food industry at sublethal doses may be endangering, rather than protecting, public health by increasing antibiotic resistance in bacteria and enhancing their ability to form harmful biofilms, according to a study published ahead of print in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. This is among the first studies to examine the latter phenomenon. [More]
UCSB anthropologists find successful hunting boosts testosterone, cortisol levels in Tsimane men

UCSB anthropologists find successful hunting boosts testosterone, cortisol levels in Tsimane men

While small-scale horticulture is a relatively recent addition to the human repertoire of food provisioning, hunting has deep evolutionary roots. In practically every society, hunting ability correlates with reproductive success - the better the hunter, the more children he is likely to father. [More]
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