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Preserving natural structure of dietary fibre during food production can help lower blood sugar levels

Preserving natural structure of dietary fibre during food production can help lower blood sugar levels

A new study led by scientists at King's College London shows that preserving the natural structure of dietary fibre during food production can help to slow the rise in blood sugar levels after a meal. [More]
Chapman University study provides complete analysis of skill development in traditional society

Chapman University study provides complete analysis of skill development in traditional society

Chapman University's research on aging and skill development appears as the lead article in the latest issue of American Journal of Physical Anthropology. The study, called "Skill Ontogeny Among Tsimane Forager-Horticulturalists," provides the most complete analysis to date of skill development in a traditional society. [More]

New study shows Europeans waste an average of 123kg of food annually

A new study analysing available statistics on consumer food waste has estimated that Europeans waste an average of 123 kg per capita annually, or 16% of all food reaching consumers. [More]
Study: GMO labeling would not scare consumers from buying food products with GMO ingredients

Study: GMO labeling would not scare consumers from buying food products with GMO ingredients

A new study released just days after the U.S. House passed a bill that would prevent states from requiring labels on genetically modified foods reveals that GMO labeling would not act as warning labels and scare consumers away from buying products with GMO ingredients. [More]
Increased food energy supply contributes to global obesity epidemic, shows study

Increased food energy supply contributes to global obesity epidemic, shows study

Obesity – a global health problem – is increasing in many countries in step with increases in the food energy supply, according to a study published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization today. [More]

Inexpensive nickel catalyst triggers decarbonylative cross-coupling between aromatic esters and boronic acids

Esters have been identified to act as a new and clean coupling partner for the carbon-carbon bond forming cross-coupling reaction to make useful compounds for pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and organic materials. [More]
New initiative aims to determine prevalence of contaminants in Detroit’s urban agriculture soil

New initiative aims to determine prevalence of contaminants in Detroit’s urban agriculture soil

Urban gardens are becoming more commonplace across Detroit and other major urban cities throughout the United States. These gardens offer a source of free or inexpensive healthy food for the public and educate community members about food production and rehabilitating the local ecosystem. [More]
NSU launches Master of Science in Nutrition degree program

NSU launches Master of Science in Nutrition degree program

Nova Southeastern University's College of Osteopathic Medicine has launched a Master of Science in Nutrition degree program, adding to the university's vast array of health care degree options. The program is the first in Florida to offer this degree in a primarily online course format. [More]

OSU microbiologists discover new type of dairy or food thickener with probiotic characteristics

Microbiologists at Oregon State University have discovered and helped patent and commercialize a new type of dairy or food thickener, which may add probiotic characteristics to the products in which it's used. [More]
ITbM researchers find new molecules that change circadian rhythm in mammals

ITbM researchers find new molecules that change circadian rhythm in mammals

A team of chemists and biologists at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules, Nagoya University have succeeded in finding new molecules that change the circadian rhythm in mammals by applying synthetic chemistry methods, which makes use of highly selective metal catalysts. [More]
Scientists produce low-allergen, low anti-nutritional inhibitor soybean

Scientists produce low-allergen, low anti-nutritional inhibitor soybean

In the United States, nearly 15 million people and 1 in 13 children suffer from food allergy. In Arizona alone, every classroom contains at least two children with a food allergy. Soybeans are one of the eight foods regulated by the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, or FALPA. Soybean is a major ingredient in many infant formulas, processed foods and livestock feed used for agriculture. Soybeans contain several allergenic and anti-nutritional proteins that affect soybean use as food and animal feed. [More]
New data underscore global threats posed by unsafe foods

New data underscore global threats posed by unsafe foods

New data on the harm caused by foodborne illnesses underscore the global threats posed by unsafe foods, and the need for coordinated, cross-border action across the entire food supply chain, according to WHO, which next week is dedicating its annual World Health Day to the issue of food safety. [More]
Researchers reveal risks of drinking raw milk

Researchers reveal risks of drinking raw milk

An analysis conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF) found that the risks of drinking raw (unpasteurized) cow's milk are significant. Consumers are nearly 100 times more likely to get foodborne illness from drinking raw milk than they are from drinking pasteurized milk. [More]
Soft drink consumers exposed to unnecessary cancer risk

Soft drink consumers exposed to unnecessary cancer risk

Public health researchers have analyzed soda consumption data in order to characterize people's exposure to a potentially carcinogenic byproduct of some types of caramel color. Caramel color is a common ingredient in colas and other dark soft drinks. The results show that between 44 and 58 percent of people over the age of six typically have at least one can of soda per day, possibly more, potentially exposing them to 4-methylimidazole (4-MEI), a possible human carcinogen formed during the manufacture of some kinds of caramel color. [More]
WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

Urgent government action is needed to meet global targets to reduce the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and prevent the annual toll of 16 million people dying prematurely - before the age of 70 - from heart and lung diseases, stroke, cancer and diabetes, according to a new WHO report. [More]
Third annual Food Labs Conference to be held in conjunction with Pittcon 2015

Third annual Food Labs Conference to be held in conjunction with Pittcon 2015

The Pittcon Organizing Committee is pleased to announce the third annual Food Labs Conference, the only food conference focused on the food laboratory, will be held in conjunction with Pittcon 2015, in New Orleans, Louisiana. The co-location of the two conferences provides that the registration fee to attend the two-day Food Lab Conference, March. 9-10, will also include unlimited week long admission to the Pittcon exposition floor and technical program. [More]
New quantum mechanical computational method attains rapid simulation of complex molecular systems

New quantum mechanical computational method attains rapid simulation of complex molecular systems

Professor Stephan Irle and Yoshio Nishimoto at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM) of Nagoya University and Dr. Dmitri Fedorov of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST, Tsukuba) have developed a novel ultrafast quantum chemical method enabling rapid simulations of molecules containing more than a million atoms without detrimental loss in accuracy. [More]
New book explores convergence as key to stable global agricultural platform

New book explores convergence as key to stable global agricultural platform

A scientific text, Convergence of Food Security, Energy Security and Sustainable Agriculture, is now available through Springer Science+Business Media. [More]
Social status can impact health, happiness even among egalitarian forager-farmers

Social status can impact health, happiness even among egalitarian forager-farmers

In western society, where keeping up with the Joneses — or, better yet, surpassing them — is expected and even encouraged, status matters. So important is it that for many people, physical and emotional wellbeing are directly connected to their place in the social hierarchy. [More]
Studies detect integrons that cause resistance to various antibiotics

Studies detect integrons that cause resistance to various antibiotics

In Mexico the sale of antibiotics for human consumption is controlled to prevent misuse, although in the veterinary sector failure in the implementation of the Official Mexican Standard NOM-064-ZOO-2000, "Guidelines for veterinarian products prescription", has prompted common bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp to become resistant to regular drugs such as streptomycin, trimethoprim, ampicillin, gentamicin, and tetracycline as a result of excess drug use. [More]
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