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Costs of lower cognitive ability linked with not breastfeeding amount to over $300 billion each year

Costs of lower cognitive ability linked with not breastfeeding amount to over $300 billion each year

When countries, rich or poor, support breastfeeding through meaningful investments and programs, it has an impact on their bottom line and the health of women and children. The Lancet Breastfeeding Series, released today, finds that globally, the costs of lower cognitive ability associated with not breastfeeding amount to more than $300 billion each year, a figure comparable to the entire global pharmaceutical market. [More]
UNICEF launches US $2.8 billion appeal to meet the needs of children in crisis

UNICEF launches US $2.8 billion appeal to meet the needs of children in crisis

In the Pacific Islands, many children don’t have enough safe water to drink and their education has been interrupted as result of the severe, ongoing El Niño. [More]
Malaysian scientists join forces with Harvard experts to help revolutionize lung disease treatment

Malaysian scientists join forces with Harvard experts to help revolutionize lung disease treatment

Malaysian scientists are joining forces with Harvard University experts to help revolutionize the treatment of lung diseases -- the delivery of nanomedicine deep into places otherwise impossible to reach. [More]
Study shows clear role of bacteria in modulating immune function in the lungs

Study shows clear role of bacteria in modulating immune function in the lungs

Microbiota--the trillions of bacteria that co-exist in the body--regulate the ability of lung dendritic cells to generate immune responses, according to a study led by researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, published online in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Bacteriophage therapy: an alternative to antibiotics? An interview Professor Clokie

Bacteriophage therapy: an alternative to antibiotics? An interview Professor Clokie

A phage is a virus that infects a bacterium. People often get very confused about what the difference is between a virus and a bacterium. A virus, like a bacterium, is also a microorganism, but unlike bacteria, it needs to have a host to be able to replicate and propagate. [More]
New fluorescent dye could serve as powerful tool to visualize biological events in living cells

New fluorescent dye could serve as powerful tool to visualize biological events in living cells

A new photostable fluorescent dye for super resolution microscopy could serve as a powerful tool to visualize biological events and structural details in living cells at real-time for prolonged recording periods. [More]
Nagoya University professor receives 2015 Van Meter Award for thyroid research

Nagoya University professor receives 2015 Van Meter Award for thyroid research

Takashi Yoshimura, a professor at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules at Nagoya University in Japan, has won the 2015 Van Meter Award for his contributions to thyroid research. [More]
Exposure to acrylamide through STP use much smaller than exposure from diet or cigarette smoking

Exposure to acrylamide through STP use much smaller than exposure from diet or cigarette smoking

The first comprehensive assessment of the acrylamide content of smokeless tobacco products (STPs) has shown that exposure to acrylamide through STP use is much smaller than --approximately 1% of -- exposure from the diet or from cigarette smoking. [More]
Consumer's financial resources influence quality of nutrition, diet

Consumer's financial resources influence quality of nutrition, diet

Quality of nutrition and diet is influenced by the consumer's financial resources, reveals a study funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation. Some immigrants have a healthier diet than people born in Switzerland. [More]
Online course offered in October on zoonotic disease

Online course offered in October on zoonotic disease

Recent outbreaks of plague, tularemia and increasing incidents of rabies exposure highlight the importance of zoonotic disease education for physicians and public health professionals. [More]
Preserving natural structure of dietary fibre during food production can help lower blood sugar levels

Preserving natural structure of dietary fibre during food production can help lower blood sugar levels

A new study led by scientists at King's College London shows that preserving the natural structure of dietary fibre during food production can help to slow the rise in blood sugar levels after a meal. [More]
Chapman University study provides complete analysis of skill development in traditional society

Chapman University study provides complete analysis of skill development in traditional society

Chapman University's research on aging and skill development appears as the lead article in the latest issue of American Journal of Physical Anthropology. The study, called "Skill Ontogeny Among Tsimane Forager-Horticulturalists," provides the most complete analysis to date of skill development in a traditional society. [More]

New study shows Europeans waste an average of 123kg of food annually

A new study analysing available statistics on consumer food waste has estimated that Europeans waste an average of 123 kg per capita annually, or 16% of all food reaching consumers. [More]
Study: GMO labeling would not scare consumers from buying food products with GMO ingredients

Study: GMO labeling would not scare consumers from buying food products with GMO ingredients

A new study released just days after the U.S. House passed a bill that would prevent states from requiring labels on genetically modified foods reveals that GMO labeling would not act as warning labels and scare consumers away from buying products with GMO ingredients. [More]
Increased food energy supply contributes to global obesity epidemic, shows study

Increased food energy supply contributes to global obesity epidemic, shows study

Obesity – a global health problem – is increasing in many countries in step with increases in the food energy supply, according to a study published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization today. [More]

Inexpensive nickel catalyst triggers decarbonylative cross-coupling between aromatic esters and boronic acids

Esters have been identified to act as a new and clean coupling partner for the carbon-carbon bond forming cross-coupling reaction to make useful compounds for pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and organic materials. [More]

New initiative aims to determine prevalence of contaminants in Detroit’s urban agriculture soil

Urban gardens are becoming more commonplace across Detroit and other major urban cities throughout the United States. These gardens offer a source of free or inexpensive healthy food for the public and educate community members about food production and rehabilitating the local ecosystem. [More]
NSU launches Master of Science in Nutrition degree program

NSU launches Master of Science in Nutrition degree program

Nova Southeastern University's College of Osteopathic Medicine has launched a Master of Science in Nutrition degree program, adding to the university's vast array of health care degree options. The program is the first in Florida to offer this degree in a primarily online course format. [More]

OSU microbiologists discover new type of dairy or food thickener with probiotic characteristics

Microbiologists at Oregon State University have discovered and helped patent and commercialize a new type of dairy or food thickener, which may add probiotic characteristics to the products in which it's used. [More]
ITbM researchers find new molecules that change circadian rhythm in mammals

ITbM researchers find new molecules that change circadian rhythm in mammals

A team of chemists and biologists at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules, Nagoya University have succeeded in finding new molecules that change the circadian rhythm in mammals by applying synthetic chemistry methods, which makes use of highly selective metal catalysts. [More]
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