Fragile X Syndrome News and Research RSS Feed - Fragile X Syndrome News and Research

Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation. A problem with a specific gene causes the disease. Normally, the gene makes a protein you need for brain development. But the mutation causes a person to make little or none of the protein, which results in the symptoms of Fragile X.
Study shows bryostatin plays key role in slowing or reversing Alzheimer's disease

Study shows bryostatin plays key role in slowing or reversing Alzheimer's disease

Neurotrope, Inc. (OTCQB: NTRP) today announced that results from a new study, entitled, "PKCe Deficits in Alzheimer's Disease Brains and Skin Fibroblasts," published in the recent edition of the peer-reviewed Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and co-authored by Tapan K. Khan, Ph.D.; Abhik Sen, Ph.D.; Jarin Hongpaisan, Ph.D.; Chol S. Lim, Ph.D.; Thomas J. Nelson, Ph.D., and; Dr. Daniel L. Alkon, each of the Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute (BRNI), provide further indication of the role that protein kinase C epsilon (PKCe) may play in the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Study: Socialization emerges as relative strength in boys with fragile X

Study: Socialization emerges as relative strength in boys with fragile X

Standard scores measuring "adaptive behavior" in boys with fragile X syndrome tend to decline during childhood and adolescence, the largest longitudinal study of the inherited disorder to date has found. [More]
Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with autistic behaviors

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes obsessive-compulsive and repetitive behaviors, and other behaviors on the autistic spectrum, as well as cognitive deficits. It is the most common inherited cause of mental impairment and the most common cause of autism. [More]
Research leads to better understanding of neurodegenerative, neurodevelopmental diseases

Research leads to better understanding of neurodegenerative, neurodevelopmental diseases

Throughout our lives, our brains adapt to what we learn and memorise. The brain is indeed made up of complex networks of neurons and synapses that are constantly re-configured. [More]
Agricultural pesticides raise risk of autism in unborn children

Agricultural pesticides raise risk of autism in unborn children

Pregnant women who lived in close proximity to fields and farms where chemical pesticides were applied experienced a two-thirds increased risk of having a child with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental delay, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found. The associations were stronger when the exposures occurred during the second and third trimesters of the women's pregnancies. [More]
UT Southwestern launches regional brain tissue collection program

UT Southwestern launches regional brain tissue collection program

To promote greater understanding of autism, UT Southwestern Medical Center has launched a regional brain tissue collection program that will support research on this condition, which affects an estimated one in 68 children. [More]
Children with autism experience deficits in immune cell that protects against infection

Children with autism experience deficits in immune cell that protects against infection

Children with autism experience deficits in a type of immune cell that protects the body from infection. Called granulocytes, the cells exhibit one-third the capacity to fight infection and protect the body from invasion compared with the same cells in children who are developing normally. [More]
U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

University of Virginia neurologist Dr. Erin Pennock Foff, biologist Sarah Kucenas and biomedical engineer Shayn Peirce-Cotter have been named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards to benefit children of the United States. Each scientist will receive $100,000 in direct annual research support from The Hartwell Foundation for three years. [More]
Experimental anticancer compound appears to reverse behaviors associated with schizophrenia

Experimental anticancer compound appears to reverse behaviors associated with schizophrenia

Johns Hopkins researchers say that an experimental anticancer compound appears to have reversed behaviors associated with schizophrenia and restored some lost brain cell function in adolescent mice with a rodent version of the devastating mental illness. [More]
UC Davis MIND Institute named Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center

UC Davis MIND Institute named Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center

The UC Davis MIND Institute has been named an Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center, through a prestigious grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health - a distinction held by only a handful of neurodevelopmental centers nationwide committed to the diagnosis, prevention, treatment and amelioration of developmental disorders such as autism, fragile X syndrome and Down syndrome. [More]

Atypical development can be spotted at 12 months of age among siblings of children with autism

Atypical development can be detected as early as 12 months of age among the siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder, a study published by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute and UCLA has found. [More]
Protein that controls Drosophila nervous system may play role in reversing brain injuries in human

Protein that controls Drosophila nervous system may play role in reversing brain injuries in human

​A protein that controls the metamorphosis of the common fruit fly could someday play a role in reversing brain injuries, said Duke University researchers. [More]
Research: Motor proteins transport mRNA to get where it is needed, prevent diseases

Research: Motor proteins transport mRNA to get where it is needed, prevent diseases

Scientists have found that mRNA may travel one way down a cell, then board another, aptly named motor protein, and head in the opposite direction to get where it ultimately needs to be. [More]
AMP 2013 to focus on genomics, proteomics, informatics, reimbursement and optimization of patient care

AMP 2013 to focus on genomics, proteomics, informatics, reimbursement and optimization of patient care

AMP will host its largest ever annual meeting next week with an expected attendance of more than 1,700 molecular diagnostic professionals plus 1,300 representatives from more than 180 exhibiting companies. With more than 25 hours of educational sessions and 350 poster presentations, the AMP 2013 Annual Meeting is the premier source for educational information on all things molecular. [More]
Researchers describe why current medications only moderately reduce Fragile X symptoms

Researchers describe why current medications only moderately reduce Fragile X symptoms

When you experience something, neurons in the brain send chemical signals called neurotransmitters across synapses to receptors on other neurons. How well that process unfolds determines how you comprehend the experience and what behaviors might follow. In people with Fragile X syndrome, a third of whom are eventually diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, that process is severely hindered, leading to intellectual impairments and abnormal behaviors. [More]
Genetic mutation found to restore translational balance in mice

Genetic mutation found to restore translational balance in mice

In a biological quirk that promises to provide researchers with a new approach for studying and potentially treating Fragile X syndrome, scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) have shown that knocking out a gene important for messenger RNA (mRNA) translation in neurons restores memory deficits and reduces behavioral symptoms in a mouse model of a prevalent human neurological disease. [More]
SAGE Therapeutics obtains $20M Series B financing from two investors

SAGE Therapeutics obtains $20M Series B financing from two investors

SAGE Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company developing novel medicines to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases, today announced a $20 million Series B financing from investors ARCH Venture Partners and Third Rock Ventures, bringing the total raised to $57.8 million since launch in 2011. [More]
Neuroscientist receives CAREER grant to research on auditory processing and sound localization

Neuroscientist receives CAREER grant to research on auditory processing and sound localization

​Twenty years ago Khaleel A. Razak was an electronics engineering student focused on creating a telephone for hearing-impaired children in Chennai, India. Today he is a neuroscientist at the University of California, Riverside whose research on how the brain processes everyday sounds may lead to therapies for age-related hearing problems and Fragile X Syndrome. [More]
Scientists study genetic factors involved in complex diseases

Scientists study genetic factors involved in complex diseases

Although heavily studied, the specific genetic causes of "complex diseases," a category of disorders which includes autism, diabetes and heart disease, are largely unknown due to byzantine genetic and environmental interactions. [More]
Researchers identify the way FMRP contributes to progression of breast cancer

Researchers identify the way FMRP contributes to progression of breast cancer

A research team led by scientists from VIB/KU Leuven, Belgium, and the University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy, in collaboration with several research centers and hospitals in Italy, the United Kingdom and, Belgium, has identified the way Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein or FMRP contributes to the progression of breast cancer. [More]