Ganglion News and Research RSS Feed - Ganglion News and Research

In anatomy, a ganglion (plural ''ganglia'') is a biological tissue mass, most commonly a mass of nerve cell bodies. Cells found in a ganglion are called ganglion cells, though this term is also sometimes used to refer specifically to retinal ganglion cells.
Gene therapy provides life-long protection to photoreceptor cells in animal model of retinitis pigmentosa

Gene therapy provides life-long protection to photoreceptor cells in animal model of retinitis pigmentosa

A collaboration between scientists in the UK and the USA has shown that gene therapy can give life-long protection to the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells responsible for colour vision in a mouse model of the most common inherited eye disorder. [More]
Retina contains microtubule "roadway" that provides energy required for visual processing

Retina contains microtubule "roadway" that provides energy required for visual processing

Researchers have discovered a thick band of microtubules in certain neurons in the retina that they believe acts as a transport road for mitochondria that help provide energy required for visual processing. [More]
OphthaliX enters into definitive agreement to purchase Improved Vision Systems

OphthaliX enters into definitive agreement to purchase Improved Vision Systems

OphthaliX Inc., a clinical-stage company focused on developing therapeutic products for the treatment of ophthalmic disorders and a subsidiary of Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., announced today it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Israel-based Improved Vision Systems Ltd. in a stock-for-stock transaction. [More]
Research finding could help develop artificial retinas for people with vision loss

Research finding could help develop artificial retinas for people with vision loss

Driving a car at 40 mph, you see a child dart into the street. You hit the brakes. Disaster averted. But how did your eyes detect that movement? It's a question that has confounded scientists. Now, studying mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have an answer: A neural circuit in the retina at the back of the eye carries signals that enable the eye to detect movement. [More]
INS announces winners of inaugural best abstract competition at 12th World Congress

INS announces winners of inaugural best abstract competition at 12th World Congress

The International Neuromodulation Society (INS) announced winners today of its inaugural best abstract competition at the 12th World Congress in Montreal. [More]
UC Davis funds BRAIN-STIM program to uncover potential treatments for neurodegenerative disorders

UC Davis funds BRAIN-STIM program to uncover potential treatments for neurodegenerative disorders

In 2013, President Obama announced the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative, unveiling plans to make a bold investment to understand the human mind with the intent to uncover ways to prevent, treat and cure brain disorders like Alzheimer's, autism, and epilepsy. [More]
Proteomics helps identify previously unrecognized proteins and pathways in nerve regeneration

Proteomics helps identify previously unrecognized proteins and pathways in nerve regeneration

Using proteomics techniques to study injured optic nerves, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have identified previously unrecognized proteins and pathways involved in nerve regeneration. Adding back one of these proteins--the oncogene c-myc--they achieved unprecedented optic nerve regeneration in mice when combined with two other known strategies. [More]

Researchers use virtual reality to develop new method for measuring balance control in glaucoma patients

Falls are the leading cause of injury-related death and morbidity in older adults, especially those with a chronic eye disease such as glaucoma. To investigate this problem, a multidisciplinary group of researchers has become the first to use virtual reality technology to develop a new method for measuring balance control in those with glaucoma. [More]
Sympathetic nerve block shows no major benefit for PTSD in randomized controlled trial

Sympathetic nerve block shows no major benefit for PTSD in randomized controlled trial

A sympathetic nerve block that has shown promise for treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) performed no better than sham treatment in a randomized controlled trial, new research shows. [More]
18F-fluoride PET/MR imaging could diagnose cause of foot pain better than other methods

18F-fluoride PET/MR imaging could diagnose cause of foot pain better than other methods

A single scan could diagnose the cause of foot pain better and with less radiation exposure to the patient than other methods, according to a study in the March 2015 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. [More]
IUPUI's Jason Meyer awarded $1.8 million NIH grant to explore how glaucoma develops in stem cells

IUPUI's Jason Meyer awarded $1.8 million NIH grant to explore how glaucoma develops in stem cells

Jason Meyer, Ph.D., assistant professor of biology in the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, has received a National Institutes of Health grant to study how glaucoma develops in stem cells created from skin cells genetically predisposed to the disease. [More]
Understanding the pattern of cellular changes that lead to retinal ganglion cell death in glaucoma

Understanding the pattern of cellular changes that lead to retinal ganglion cell death in glaucoma

Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, usually stems from elevated eye pressure, which in turn damages and destroys specialized neurons in the eye known as retinal ganglion cells. To better understand these cellular changes and how they influence the progression and severity of glaucoma, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Shiley Eye Institute turned to a mouse model of the disease. [More]
New research sheds light on the role of Sox10 protein in Hirschsprung's disease patients

New research sheds light on the role of Sox10 protein in Hirschsprung's disease patients

Defects in the protein Sox10, a transcription factor that regulates gene expression, may play a role in the development of post-operative GI dysfunction in Hirschsprung's disease patients, according to new research published in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the new basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Researchers find way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss

Researchers find way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss

Researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College and the Gladstone Institutes have found a way to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in a mouse using a simple chemical compound that is a precursor to vitamin B3. This discovery has important implications not only for preventing hearing loss, but also potentially for treating some aging-related conditions that are linked to the same protein. [More]
Researchers unravel separate biological responses of the eye to blue light

Researchers unravel separate biological responses of the eye to blue light

Blue light can both set the mood and set in motion important biological responses. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Medicine and School of Arts and Sciences have teased apart the separate biological responses of the human eye to blue light, revealing an unexpected contest for control. [More]
LaVision BioTec report on users of light sheet microscopy in the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis

LaVision BioTec report on users of light sheet microscopy in the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis

LaVison BioTec, developers of advanced microscopy solutions for the life sciences, report on users of their Ultramicroscope Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscope system to aid the research of the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis under the supervision of Professor Vance Lemmon, the Walter G. Ross Distinguished Chair in Developmental Neuroscience & Professor of Neurological Surgery at the University of Miami. [More]
Pitt researchers awarded $1.25 million DOD grant to establish whole-eye transplantation program

Pitt researchers awarded $1.25 million DOD grant to establish whole-eye transplantation program

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers have been awarded $1.25 million from the U.S. Department of Defense to fund two projects that aim to establish the groundwork for the nation's first whole-eye transplantation program. [More]
UT Arlington scientists explore how fluid flow could play significant role in neuronal growth

UT Arlington scientists explore how fluid flow could play significant role in neuronal growth

A University of Texas at Arlington team exploring how neuron growth can be controlled in the lab and, possibly, in the human body has published a new paper in Nature Scientific Reports on how fluid flow could play a significant role. [More]
DNA testing for congenital cataracts can accurately diagnose diseases linked to childhood blindness

DNA testing for congenital cataracts can accurately diagnose diseases linked to childhood blindness

Researchers in the United Kingdom have demonstrated that advanced DNA testing for congenital cataracts can quickly and accurately diagnose a number of rare diseases marked by childhood blindness, according to a study published online today in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. [More]
Doctors test device designed to 'turn off' cluster headaches

Doctors test device designed to 'turn off' cluster headaches

For those suffering excruciating pain from cluster headaches, relief may soon be available from an investigational device being studied in a national multicenter clinical trial. Recently, doctors at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center performed the first surgery in the United States to insert a neurostimulator to provide relief from cluster headaches, which are more painful than migraines. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement