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Phillips School of Nursing receives approval to offer second degree ABSN program

Phillips School of Nursing receives approval to offer second degree ABSN program

The Phillips School of Nursing at Mount Sinai Beth Israel announced today that it has received approval from the New York State Education Department to offer a second degree accelerated bachelor of science in nursing beginning in the spring of 2017. [More]
TUM scientists discover molecular mechanism responsible for liver metastases at early stage

TUM scientists discover molecular mechanism responsible for liver metastases at early stage

Pancreatic cancer is an exceptionally aggressive type of cancer. Frequently, metastases already start to grow in other organs, particularly often in the liver, before the original tumor was even detected. [More]
Experimental PET tracer can diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration in living person

Experimental PET tracer can diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration in living person

An experimental positron emission tomography (PET) tracer can effectively diagnose concussion-related brain degeneration while a person is still alive, according to a proof-of-concept study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published September 27 in the journal Translational Psychiatry. [More]
Unknown exposure to second-hand smoke linked to increased mortality in non-smokers

Unknown exposure to second-hand smoke linked to increased mortality in non-smokers

A new biomarker has identified known and unknown exposure to second-hand smoke and confirmed a strong association to increased mortality in non-smokers, according to a new study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Gastroenterology specialist receives national award for research into feeding tubes

Gastroenterology specialist receives national award for research into feeding tubes

A gastroenterology specialist has won a national award for his research into feeding tubes. Dr Matt Kurien has investigated which patients benefit most from feeding tubes, and provided evidence to help clinicians decide which cases are most suitable. [More]
Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Researchers for the first time have identified the skin phenotype of pediatric eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD) in infants, opening the door for personalized treatment approaches for young children with eczema. [More]
Mayo Clinic article provides better understanding on potentially devastating liver disease

Mayo Clinic article provides better understanding on potentially devastating liver disease

An article published today in the New England Journal of Medicine updates the medical community on a potentially devastating liver disease that afflicts approximately 29,000 Americans. [More]
Mount Sinai and TJU researchers awarded grant for UM research

Mount Sinai and TJU researchers awarded grant for UM research

Uveal melanoma (UM) is the second most common type of skin cancer. Approximately 50 percent of patients will develop metastasis or spread of their cancer, most commonly to the liver. [More]
Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Drugs that interfere with bile acid recycling can prevent several aspects of NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) in mice fed a high-fat diet, scientists from Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta have shown. [More]
Leading experts in iron deficiency to participate in 3rd European Iron Academy meeting

Leading experts in iron deficiency to participate in 3rd European Iron Academy meeting

The 3rd European Iron Academy (EIA) will take place on the 12th and 13th September 2016 in Berlin, Germany, and will bring together over 450 clinicians with an interest in iron deficiency. [More]
Hamilton researchers conduct ground-breaking new trial on pediatric fecal transplant for IBD

Hamilton researchers conduct ground-breaking new trial on pediatric fecal transplant for IBD

Hamilton researchers are conducting a ground-breaking new trial looking at fecal transplants to help treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children. [More]
Study reveals effectiveness of endoscopic suturing of colon perforations

Study reveals effectiveness of endoscopic suturing of colon perforations

As the number of people receiving colonoscopies has increased in recent years, polyp detection has improved and the number of endoscopic procedures to remove polyps has increased. [More]
NUS study reveals RNA editing events play vital role in gastric cancer development

NUS study reveals RNA editing events play vital role in gastric cancer development

A team of researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore has found that changes in ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequences play a major role in the development of gastric cancer. [More]
Study opens door to new class of therapies for Ras-dependent cancers

Study opens door to new class of therapies for Ras-dependent cancers

New research from The Tisch Cancer Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai identifies a protein that may be an unexplored target to develop new cancer therapies. [More]
UC researchers offer more insights into how lack of gut bacteria influences fat absorption

UC researchers offer more insights into how lack of gut bacteria influences fat absorption

A study led by University of Cincinnati lipid metabolism researchers lends additional insight into how bacteria in the gut, or lack thereof, influences intestinal mast cells (MMC) activation and perhaps fat absorption. [More]
Schizophrenia drug slows pancreatic tumor growth in mice

Schizophrenia drug slows pancreatic tumor growth in mice

A receptor for the dopamine neurotransmitter promotes growth and spread of pancreatic cancer -- and schizophrenia drugs, which block the function of this receptor, slowed tumor growth and metastatic spread in mice, according to researchers at McGill University and the German Cancer Research Center. [More]
Research strongly links smoking to bowel condition relapses

Research strongly links smoking to bowel condition relapses

Smoking is strongly linked to relapse of a serious bowel condition, research has confirmed. [More]
New stem-cell model of heart tissue unravels mechanisms linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

New stem-cell model of heart tissue unravels mechanisms linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Using advanced stem cell technology, scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have created a model of a heart condition called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) — an excessive thickening of the heart that is associated with a number of rare and common illnesses, some of which have a strong genetic component. [More]
QOL Medical to introduce new disease awareness-raising tool at WCPGHAN 2016

QOL Medical to introduce new disease awareness-raising tool at WCPGHAN 2016

QOL Medical, LLC announced today they will introduce a ground breaking hyper-targeted marketing tool at the 5th Annual World Congress of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, from October 5th-8th 2016 in Montreal, Canada. [More]
Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower cognitive response times, study shows

Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower cognitive response times, study shows

New research published in the UEG Journal1 has found that Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower response times than matched individuals that do not have the disease. [More]
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