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Gastroenterology is the branch of medicine where the digestive system and its disorders are studied.
New AGA guideline changes clinical practice for patients with asymptomatic pancreatic cysts

New AGA guideline changes clinical practice for patients with asymptomatic pancreatic cysts

A new guideline from the American Gastroenterological Association changes clinical practice by recommending longer surveillance periods for patients with asymptomatic pancreatic cysts and new criteria that limits surgery to those who will receive the most benefit. [More]
Study reveals how Grhl2 plays a role in kidney function

Study reveals how Grhl2 plays a role in kidney function

The kidney carries out vital functions by continuously filtering the blood and excreting waste products into the urine. This is achieved by a complex system of tubules which transports the urine and regulates its composition. [More]
BCM-95 Curcumin improves chemotherapy's effectiveness in killing chemoresistant cancer cells

BCM-95 Curcumin improves chemotherapy's effectiveness in killing chemoresistant cancer cells

Cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy is a major cause of death in patients with colorectal cancer. In a first-of-its-kind study, BCM-95 Curcumin was found to improve chemotherapy's effectiveness in killing chemoresistant cells via a mechanism not previously identified. [More]
Medigus announces completion of three MUSE procedures for GERD treatment in Italy

Medigus announces completion of three MUSE procedures for GERD treatment in Italy

Medigus Ltd., a medical device company developing minimally invasive endosurgical tools and a leader in direct visualization technology, announced the completion of three MUSE procedures in Italy by renowned gastroenterologist, Professor Pier Alberto Testoni, Director of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy IRCCS at San Raffaele Hospital in Milan. [More]
Improving adherence to ulcerative colitis medications: an interview with Mattias Norrman, COO, Tillotts Pharma

Improving adherence to ulcerative colitis medications: an interview with Mattias Norrman, COO, Tillotts Pharma

The objective of the survey was two-sided. On one side, we wanted to better understand needs, concerns and attitudes of people with UC in an effort to identify solutions to improve the management of the disease. On the other, we wanted to build a questionnaire that could be used by HCPs to help define patients’ needs and concerns. [More]
Loyola's Neil Gupta recommends patients to ask four questions when planning a colonoscopy

Loyola's Neil Gupta recommends patients to ask four questions when planning a colonoscopy

"Most people focus on the dislike of the preparation, the need to arrange transportation and the fear of being anesthetized during the procedure and then potentially getting a cancer diagnosis," says Neil Gupta, MD, MPH, Director of Endoscopy at Loyola University Health System. "Screening colonoscopy is a very critical examination that really can determine life and death when it comes to colon cancer. It is now clear that not every colonoscopy is equal. Once you've decided it's time to get a screening colonoscopy, the next step is to make sure that you get a high-quality one." [More]
Study may help men make better decisions about aggressive prostate cancer treatments

Study may help men make better decisions about aggressive prostate cancer treatments

A Northwestern University-led study in the emerging field of nanocytology could one day help men make better decisions about whether or not to undergo aggressive prostate cancer treatments. [More]
New hepatitis C drugs to place economic burden on health care system, predicts MD Anderson study

New hepatitis C drugs to place economic burden on health care system, predicts MD Anderson study

The cost of treating people infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) with newly approved therapies will likely place a tremendous economic burden on the country's health care system. The prediction comes from a cost-effectiveness analysis led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Naproxen and omeprazole combination effective in preventing bladder cancer

Naproxen and omeprazole combination effective in preventing bladder cancer

The anti-inflammatory class of drugs NSAIDs have shown great promise in preventing cancers including colon, esophagus and skin. However, they can increase the risks of heart attacks, ulcers and rare but potentially life-threatening bleeds. [More]
Regenstrief researchers create accurate system for tracking quality of colonoscopies

Regenstrief researchers create accurate system for tracking quality of colonoscopies

An accurate system for tracking the quality of colonoscopies and determining the appropriate intervals between these procedures could contribute to both better health outcomes and lower costs. Clinician-researchers from the Regenstrief Institute have created and tested such a system in the nation's first multiple institution colonoscopy quality measurement study utilizing natural language processing and report that it is as accurate but less expensive than human review. [More]
Young immigrants to Canada at greater risk of developing IBD

Young immigrants to Canada at greater risk of developing IBD

The younger a person is when they immigrate to Canada, the higher their risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and its major subtypes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, according to a study by researchers at the University of Ottawa, the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario. [More]
MedUni Vienna experts recommend regular colonoscopy screening to prevent bowel cancer

MedUni Vienna experts recommend regular colonoscopy screening to prevent bowel cancer

Bowel cancer is one of the most common types of cancer. The prognosis depends greatly on the stage at which the tumour is discovered. Colonoscopy is regarded as the best method for identifying pre-cancerous changes. If these changes are treated promptly, the disease can be stopped in its tracks. [More]
Better understanding of stomach's response to infection could lead to therapies against gastric damage

Better understanding of stomach's response to infection could lead to therapies against gastric damage

A better understanding of the stomach's immune response to Helicobater pylori (H. pylori) infection could lead to new therapies targeting damage in the stomach, report researchers in the March issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Biomarker for compilation of Risk Score for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

Biomarker for compilation of Risk Score for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

40 percent of people in the EU suffer from non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (fatty liver disease), a disease which is becoming increasingly more frequent as a result of diabetes and excess weight in an affluent society. Currently, it is not possible to forecast the further course of the disease - right up to cirrhosis and cancer of the liver. Furthermore, an increased risk of heart attack and kidney damage exists. In future, this should become possible using a Risk Score with different biomarkers. [More]
Hitachi Aloka Medical announces release of Ultrasound Bone Densitometry System at ECR 2015

Hitachi Aloka Medical announces release of Ultrasound Bone Densitometry System at ECR 2015

Mr Minoru Yoshizumi, President of Hitachi Aloka Medical Ltd., Tokyo, Japan, is pleased to announce the release of EggQus, an extraordinary compact, portable Ultrasound Bone Densitometry System at the European Radiology Congress. Delegates will have the opportunity to see and test EggQus at the Hitachi Medical Systems booth 323, Expo C. [More]
OTC medications, dietary and herbal supplements cause drug-induced acute liver failure

OTC medications, dietary and herbal supplements cause drug-induced acute liver failure

Drug-induced acute liver failure is uncommon, and over-the-counter medications and dietary and herbal supplements -- not prescription drugs -- are its most common causes, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Physicians urge households to add 'clean my medicine cabinet' to Spring cleaning chores list

Physicians urge households to add 'clean my medicine cabinet' to Spring cleaning chores list

After marijuana and alcohol, the most commonly abused drugs by those over the age of 14 are prescription and over-the-counter medications. [More]
NYU Langone reminds people about importance of screening and preventing colorectal cancer

NYU Langone reminds people about importance of screening and preventing colorectal cancer

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. However, according to Mark Pochapin, MD, the Sholtz/Leeds professor of Gastroenterology and director of the Division of Gastroenterology at NYU Langone Medical Center : "With early screening and prevention, this is one cancer that is highly curable and often preventable." [More]
FDA approves LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) to prevent pregnancy

FDA approves LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) to prevent pregnancy

Actavis plc, a leading global specialty pharmaceutical company, and Medicines360, a nonprofit women's health pharmaceutical company, today announced the approval of LILETTA (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use by women to prevent pregnancy for up to three years. [More]
AGA receives gift to support young investigators advance into neuroenteric disease research

AGA receives gift to support young investigators advance into neuroenteric disease research

The American Gastroenterological Association Research Foundation has received a generous gift from prominent San Francisco philanthropist Athena Blackburn, which will create new research opportunities for young investigators who are interested in neuroenteric disease. [More]
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