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Bedfont Scientific signs OEM deal with Laborie for Gastrolyzer range of breath monitors

Bedfont Scientific signs OEM deal with Laborie for Gastrolyzer range of breath monitors

Laborie, an international leader in medical devices but notably gastroenterology, has signed an OEM agreement with Bedfont Scientific for their Gastrolyzer range of hydrogen and methane breath monitors. [More]
Bedfont introduces GastroCH4ECK Gastrolyzer to help detect gastrointestinal disorders

Bedfont introduces GastroCH4ECK Gastrolyzer to help detect gastrointestinal disorders

Bedfont Scientific has specialised in the design and manufacture of exhaled breath and gas monitoring instruments since 1976. With an unprecedented network of distributors, Bedfont’s products can be found in over 70 countries worldwide. [More]
NASPGHAN clinical practice guidelines recommend screening test for NAFLD in obese children

NASPGHAN clinical practice guidelines recommend screening test for NAFLD in obese children

A screening test for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)--a serious condition that may have lifelong health consequences--is recommended for all obese children aged nine to eleven years, according to clinical practice guidelines developed by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. [More]
MSHS introduces DigniCap scalp cooling system to reduce chemotherapy-induced hair loss

MSHS introduces DigniCap scalp cooling system to reduce chemotherapy-induced hair loss

The Mount Sinai Health System announced the launch of the DigniCap scalp cooling system, which was recently cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to reduce the likelihood of chemotherapy-induced hair loss in women with breast cancer, in three of its cancer center locations. [More]
MSBI surgeons perform first endoscopic transoral thyroidectomy in New York

MSBI surgeons perform first endoscopic transoral thyroidectomy in New York

A team of surgeons at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, led by William B. Inabnet III, MD, the Eugene W. Friedman, MD, Professor of Surgery and Chair for the Department of Surgery at MSBI and Chief of Endocrine Surgery Quality for the Mount Sinai Health System, have performed the first endoscopic transoral thyroidectomy in New York, and one of the first of its kind in the nation. [More]
Study finds 1 in 5 pediatric celiac disease patients on gluten-free diet sustain persistent intestinal damage

Study finds 1 in 5 pediatric celiac disease patients on gluten-free diet sustain persistent intestinal damage

In surprising findings, researchers from MassGeneral Hospital for Children and Boston Children's Hospital have discovered that nearly one in five children with celiac disease sustained persistent intestinal damage, despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. [More]
Iron deficiency: an interview with Dr Thierry Teil

Iron deficiency: an interview with Dr Thierry Teil

Iron deficiency is, in fact, one of the most common nutritional disorders. It affects between three and five billion people, which is between half and two-thirds of the world population (about seven billion). Iron deficiency anemia is a subset of iron deficiency, that is about two billion people according to the WHO... [More]
Preventative strategy in stem cell transplant recipients may help thwart C. diff infections

Preventative strategy in stem cell transplant recipients may help thwart C. diff infections

It may be possible to safely prevent one of the most common - and costly to treat - infections contracted by hospitalized patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation for the treatment of blood cancers, according to a study from the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Research shows how machine-learning models can interpret echocardiographic images and enable HCM diagnosis

Research shows how machine-learning models can interpret echocardiographic images and enable HCM diagnosis

Computer algorithms can automatically interpret echocardiographic images and distinguish between pathological hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and physiological changes in athletes' hearts, according to research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, published online yesterday in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Allergan gets FDA approval for new XEN Glaucoma Treatment System

Allergan gets FDA approval for new XEN Glaucoma Treatment System

Allergan plc announced today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has cleared the XEN Glaucoma Treatment System (consisting of the XEN45 Gel Stent and the XEN Injector) for use in the U.S. [More]
Testing for Lynch syndrome: an interview with Kevin Monahan

Testing for Lynch syndrome: an interview with Kevin Monahan

Lynch syndrome is an inherited condition which causes about 1,100 cases of bowel cancer and 1,000 other cancers annually in the UK. It is caused by a fault in the mismatch repair gene (MMR) which usually works to prevent cancer. [More]
Mount Sinai cardiologists receive awards at AHA Scientific Sessions 2016

Mount Sinai cardiologists receive awards at AHA Scientific Sessions 2016

​Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, and Jeffrey W. Olin, DO, FAHA, Professor of Cardiology and Director of the Vascular Medicine and Vascular Diagnostics Laboratory at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, received awards at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, November 12-16, 2016. [More]
Study finds way to increase liver cancer screening rates among at-risk cirrhosis patients

Study finds way to increase liver cancer screening rates among at-risk cirrhosis patients

Proactive outreach to cirrhosis patients in a safety net health system successfully doubled their screening rates for liver cancer, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers found. [More]
Arthritis drug induces response and remission in patients with Crohn's disease, study finds

Arthritis drug induces response and remission in patients with Crohn's disease, study finds

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have shown that ustekinumab, a human antibody used to treat arthritis, significantly induces response and remission in patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease. [More]
Allergan, Amgen submit BLA for ABP 215 oncology biosimilar medicine to FDA

Allergan, Amgen submit BLA for ABP 215 oncology biosimilar medicine to FDA

Amgen and Allergan plc. today announced the submission of a Biologics License Application (BLA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ABP 215, a biosimilar candidate to Avastin (bevacizumab). [More]
Identifying foods that trigger IBS: an interview with Dr Bill Chey

Identifying foods that trigger IBS: an interview with Dr Bill Chey

IBS is a common medical condition which is diagnosed in the presence of characteristic gastrointestinal symptoms including recurring bouts of abdominal pain and diarrhea and/or constipation. IBS patients also commonly report bloating and abdominal distension or swelling. [More]
HCV patients treated with DAA therapy not at increased risk of developing liver cancer, study finds

HCV patients treated with DAA therapy not at increased risk of developing liver cancer, study finds

A new study presented this week at The Liver Meeting — held by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases — found patients with hepatitis C who take direct-acting antiviral medication are at no higher risk for developing liver cancer than those who do not take the medication. [More]
Particular eating behaviors linked to lower odds of developing liver diseases

Particular eating behaviors linked to lower odds of developing liver diseases

Particular eating behaviors may lower the risk of developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), according to research presented this week at The Liver Meeting — held by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. [More]
'Sponge on a string' test could spare people with Barrett's oesophagus from endoscopies

'Sponge on a string' test could spare people with Barrett's oesophagus from endoscopies

Cancer Research UK-funded scientists have discovered that a 'sponge on a string' pill test can identify which people with a condition called Barrett's oesophagus have a low risk of developing oesophageal cancer - sparing them uncomfortable endoscopies. [More]
Allergan launches first and only oral contraceptive in softgel capsule for prevention of pregnancy

Allergan launches first and only oral contraceptive in softgel capsule for prevention of pregnancy

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company, today announced the availability of TAYTULLA (norethindrone acetate and ethinyl estradiol capsules and ferrous fumarate capsules), 1mg/20mcg, the first and only oral contraceptive in a softgel capsule for the prevention of pregnancy [More]
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