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A gene is a unit of heredity in a living organism. It normally resides on a stretch of DNA that codes for a type of protein or for an RNA chain that has a function in the organism. All living things depend on genes, as they specify all proteins and functional RNA chains.
Study pinpoints how PSEN1 gene mutations can cause early onset Alzheimer's disease

Study pinpoints how PSEN1 gene mutations can cause early onset Alzheimer's disease

A University of Adelaide analysis of genetic mutations which cause early-onset Alzheimer's disease suggests a new focus for research into the causes of the disease. [More]
HDAC inhibitors may help regulate alcoholism-induced anxiety

HDAC inhibitors may help regulate alcoholism-induced anxiety

Epigenetics is the study of changes in organisms caused by modifying gene expression - by alcohol, for example - rather than alteration of the genetic code itself. Recent evidence suggests that alcohol can inhibit activity of an enzyme called histone deacetylase (HDAC) in the amygdala, a brain region that is crucial for storing memories and regulating fear, anxiety, and other emotions. [More]
Eye donations: what stops people? An interview with Rory Passmore

Eye donations: what stops people? An interview with Rory Passmore

Despite a shortage of corneas for transplant purposes, our new research reveals that eyes are the one body part we are least likely to donate. [More]
Re-engineering cardiac scarring process could improve clinical outcomes for heart disease patients

Re-engineering cardiac scarring process could improve clinical outcomes for heart disease patients

Literal heartbreak, from illness or injury, triggers the body's natural healing mechanisms. [More]
KIT researchers develop 3D prostate model based on cryogels

KIT researchers develop 3D prostate model based on cryogels

A team of researchers led by Dr. Friederike J. Gruhl and Professor Andrew C. B. Cato at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology are developing a three-dimensional model for prostate cancer research based on cryogels. [More]
Study links racial discrimination to thoughts of death among African-American youth

Study links racial discrimination to thoughts of death among African-American youth

Racial discrimination, whether it's derogatory language or unequal treatment, impacts communities and individuals in different ways. For children, the effects are sometimes emotional scars, and as a University of Houston researcher discovered, even thoughts of death. [More]
New book highlights advances, challenges in development of nanotheranostics for personalized medicine

New book highlights advances, challenges in development of nanotheranostics for personalized medicine

The future of medicine is now dawning upon us.Nanomedicines demonstrate the capability to enhance drug properties by offering protection from degradation, enabling controlled release and biodistribution and increasing bioavailability. [More]
NCX1 protein could help prevent progression of heart failure

NCX1 protein could help prevent progression of heart failure

A protein known to be crucial for maintaining the balance of calcium in cells could prove useful in halting the progression of heart failure. [More]
Neurofibromatosis causes benign tumor formation in normal nervous tissue

Neurofibromatosis causes benign tumor formation in normal nervous tissue

Although neurofibromatosis (NF) is not commonly discussed, it affects more than 2 million people worldwide. [More]
Researchers identify new potential target for pancreatic cancer treatment

Researchers identify new potential target for pancreatic cancer treatment

Using an innovative approach to identify a cancer's genetic vulnerabilities by more swiftly analyzing human tumors transplanted into mice, researchers have identified a new potential target for pancreatic cancer treatment, published online in Cell Reports. [More]
Gamma-ray irradiation improves safety of stem cell transplantation in Parkinson’s disease patients

Gamma-ray irradiation improves safety of stem cell transplantation in Parkinson’s disease patients

Replacing dopamine-producing cells in the brain represents a promising therapeutic approach in Parkinson's disease, and a new study shows how post-transplantation gamma-ray irradiation can reduce the risk of tumor formation. [More]
Positive environment can reverse trauma-related behavioral alterations in mice

Positive environment can reverse trauma-related behavioral alterations in mice

Traumatic experiences in childhood increase the risk of developing behavioral and psychiatric disorders later in life. It is also known that the consequences of a trauma can likewise be observed in the children of people affected even if those children have themselves not experienced any trauma. [More]
Broccoli sprout extract may help prevent cancer recurrence in head and neck cancer survivors

Broccoli sprout extract may help prevent cancer recurrence in head and neck cancer survivors

Potent doses of broccoli sprout extract activate a "detoxification" gene and may help prevent cancer recurrence in survivors of head and neck cancer, according to a trial by the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, partner with UPMC CancerCenter, confirming preliminary results presented last year at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting. [More]
Yale-led study shows how EGFR silences tumor suppressor genes

Yale-led study shows how EGFR silences tumor suppressor genes

A Yale-led study describes how a known cancer gene, EGFR, silences genes that typically suppress tumors. The finding, published in Cell Reports, may lead to the development of more effective, individualized treatment for patients with lung cancer and other cancer types. [More]
Mice study shows influence of dad's obesity on daughter’s body weight and breast cancer risk

Mice study shows influence of dad's obesity on daughter’s body weight and breast cancer risk

Obese male mice and normal weight female mice produce female pups that are overweight at birth through childhood, and have delayed development of their breast tissue as well as increased rates of breast cancer. [More]
Scientists discover how faulty genetic instructions contribute to development of AML

Scientists discover how faulty genetic instructions contribute to development of AML

Scientists have previously identified a series of genetic errors that commonly occur inside cancerous blood cells, but it hasn't been clear exactly how those genetic malfunctions create immature blood cells that overpopulate, crowd out healthy cells and spread in patients with acute myeloid leukemia or AML. [More]
Researchers use sensitive technique to reveal high levels of genetic heterogeneity in schizophrenia

Researchers use sensitive technique to reveal high levels of genetic heterogeneity in schizophrenia

International researchers centered at Nagoya University use a highly sensitive technique to identify significantly more DNA sequence repeats in patients with schizophrenia than in control individuals, and outline a possible link between genome instability and disease. [More]
Study reveals surprising diversity in single neuronal transcriptomes of the brain

Study reveals surprising diversity in single neuronal transcriptomes of the brain

A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, University of California, San Diego and Illumina, Inc., has completed the first large-scale assessment of single neuronal "transcriptomes." [More]
University of Miami researchers awarded new contracts to detect genetic factors linked to Alzheimer's disease risk

University of Miami researchers awarded new contracts to detect genetic factors linked to Alzheimer's disease risk

Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly and occurs in all ethnic and racial groups. It affects more than 5 million people age 65 and older in the United States alone and there is currently no effective treatment or cure. [More]
KARMA study confirms resistance to anti-malarial drugs confined to Southeast Asia

KARMA study confirms resistance to anti-malarial drugs confined to Southeast Asia

The first global mapping of artemisinin resistance has definitively confirmed that resistance to the main drug currently used in the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria is for the moment confined to Southeast Asia and has not spread to sub-Saharan Africa. [More]
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