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A gene is a unit of heredity in a living organism. It normally resides on a stretch of DNA that codes for a type of protein or for an RNA chain that has a function in the organism. All living things depend on genes, as they specify all proteins and functional RNA chains.
UAB researchers uncover vital mechanism for L-DOPA-induced-dyskinesia

UAB researchers uncover vital mechanism for L-DOPA-induced-dyskinesia

Though the drug levodopa can dramatically improve Parkinson's disease symptoms, within five years one-half of the patients using L-DOPA develop an irreversible condition -- involuntary repetitive, rapid and jerky movements. [More]
Study identifies two proteins crucial for self-renewal of skin stem cells

Study identifies two proteins crucial for self-renewal of skin stem cells

Our skin renews, heals wounds, and regenerates the hair that covers it thanks to a small group of stem cells. These cells continually produce new ones, which appear on the skin surface after a few days. [More]
Scientists identify novel way to target lung cancer through KRAS gene

Scientists identify novel way to target lung cancer through KRAS gene

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a new way to target lung cancer through the KRAS gene, one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer and one researchers have so far had difficulty targeting successfully. [More]
New study to examine genomics of anti-platelet therapy after coronary interventions

New study to examine genomics of anti-platelet therapy after coronary interventions

Which antiplatelet medication is best after a coronary stent? The Tailored Antiplatelet Therapy to Lessen Outcomes After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (TAILOR-PCI) Study examines whether prescribing heart medication based on a patient's CYP2C19 genotype will help prevent heart attack, stroke, unstable angina, and cardiovascular death in patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), commonly called angioplasty. [More]
Blood pressure hormone system important for cardiovascular health can promote obesity

Blood pressure hormone system important for cardiovascular health can promote obesity

New research by University of Iowa scientists helps explain how a hormone system often targeted to treat cardiovascular disease can also lower metabolism and promote obesity. [More]
Study reports sampling method used for new breast cancer tests may need to be refined

Study reports sampling method used for new breast cancer tests may need to be refined

Not only is breast cancer more than one disease, but a single breast cancer tumor can vary within itself, a finding that University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute researchers discovered has the potential to lead to very different patient treatment plans depending on the tumor sample and diagnostic testing used. [More]
New gene therapy shows promising results for treating neurodegenerative disorders

New gene therapy shows promising results for treating neurodegenerative disorders

A new gene therapy approach designed to replace the enzyme that is deficient in patients with the inherited neurodegenerative disorders Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases successfully delivered the therapeutic gene to the brains of treated mice, restored enzyme function, and extended survival by about 2.5-fold. [More]
Researchers discover genetic changes in MSH3 gene in patients with hereditary colon cancer

Researchers discover genetic changes in MSH3 gene in patients with hereditary colon cancer

The formation of large numbers of polyps in the colon has a high probability of developing into colon cancer, if left untreated. [More]
Scientists identify mutation responsible for new, rare genetic disorder

Scientists identify mutation responsible for new, rare genetic disorder

An international team of researchers has discovered the mutation responsible for a rare, newly identified genetic disorder that causes craniofacial abnormalities and developmental delays. [More]
Changes in the brain's pleasure center may decrease physical activity in postmenopausal women

Changes in the brain's pleasure center may decrease physical activity in postmenopausal women

As women enter menopause, their levels of physical activity decrease; for years scientists were unable to determine why. [More]
ZMYND8 protein can suppress metastasis-linked genes in prostate cancer

ZMYND8 protein can suppress metastasis-linked genes in prostate cancer

Although it reads like European license plate number, a protein known as ZMYND8 has demonstrated its ability to block metastasis-linked genes in prostate cancer, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Updated guidelines for breast cancer increase number of patients who test HER2-positive

Updated guidelines for breast cancer increase number of patients who test HER2-positive

Changes to HER2 testing guidelines for breast cancer in 2013 significantly increased the number of patients who test HER2-positive, according to a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]
Study finds risk markers for Parkinson's disease hiding in unusual spots

Study finds risk markers for Parkinson's disease hiding in unusual spots

Clues that point toward new risk mechanisms for developing Parkinson's disease are hiding in some unusual spots, according to a study published today in Scientific Reports [More]
Researchers develop tiny 3-D tissue models to study how ovarian cancer develops in women

Researchers develop tiny 3-D tissue models to study how ovarian cancer develops in women

With a unique approach that draws on 3-D printing technologies, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers is developing new tools for understanding how ovarian cancer develops in women. [More]
Researchers test new approach to treat metabolic diseases without organ transplant

Researchers test new approach to treat metabolic diseases without organ transplant

With a shortage of donor organs, Mayo Clinic is exploring therapeutic strategies for patients with debilitating liver diseases. Researchers are testing a new approach to correct metabolic disorders without a whole organ transplant. Their findings appear in Science Translational Medicine. [More]
New gene therapeutic approach could save people suffering from muscle wasting disease

New gene therapeutic approach could save people suffering from muscle wasting disease

A discovery by Washington State University scientist Dan Rodgers and collaborator Paul Gregorevic could save millions of people suffering from muscle wasting disease. [More]
Researchers find potential way for delivering gene therapy to treat eye diseases

Researchers find potential way for delivering gene therapy to treat eye diseases

Eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration are among the leading causes of irreversible vision loss and blindness worldwide. Currently, gene therapy can be administered to treat these conditions -- but this requires an injection. [More]
Study reveals long-term safety of AAV2-neurturin gene therapy in patients with Parkinson's disease

Study reveals long-term safety of AAV2-neurturin gene therapy in patients with Parkinson's disease

New safety data from a study of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease five years after gene transfer-mediated delivery of the neuroprotective factor neurturin directly to patients' brains reveal no serious adverse events related to the treatment. [More]
Scientists identify new genetic variations contributing to onset of APL

Scientists identify new genetic variations contributing to onset of APL

A study led by a team of scientists from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore has identified new genetic alterations contributing to the onset of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL). [More]
Shorter and longer reproductive durations can raise risk of type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal women

Shorter and longer reproductive durations can raise risk of type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal women

Using data from the Women's Health Initiative, a new study has found that women with reproductive-period durations of less than 30 years had a 37% increased risk of type 2 diabetes compared with women whose reproductive durations were somewhere in the middle (36 to 40 years). [More]
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