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A gene is a unit of heredity in a living organism. It normally resides on a stretch of DNA that codes for a type of protein or for an RNA chain that has a function in the organism. All living things depend on genes, as they specify all proteins and functional RNA chains.

Study sheds light on how extra chromosome 21 upsets equilibrium of entire genome in Down syndrome

Occurring in about one per eight hundred births, Down syndrome - or trisomy 21 - is the most frequent genetic cause of intellectual disability. It results from a chromosomal abnormality where cells of affected individuals contain a third copy of chromosome 21 (1% of the human genome). [More]
Researchers discover new marker derived from human umbilical cord blood

Researchers discover new marker derived from human umbilical cord blood

The development of stem cell therapies to cure a variety of diseases depends on the ability to characterize stem cell populations based on cell surface markers. [More]

Engineering cell-based, biological devices may selectively kill cancer cells without disrupting healthy cells

​A Northwestern University synthetic biology team has created a new technology for modifying human cells to create programmable therapeutics that could travel the body and selectively target cancer and other sites of disease. [More]
Global cancer profiling market expected to grow $54.8 billion by 2018

Global cancer profiling market expected to grow $54.8 billion by 2018

Global Information Inc. announces the addition of a new market research report "Cancer Profiling and Pathways: Technologies and Global Markets" at GIIResearch.com. [More]
Researchers identify novel vancomycin-resistant MRSA superbug in Brazil

Researchers identify novel vancomycin-resistant MRSA superbug in Brazil

An international research team led by Cesar A. Arias, M.D., Ph.D., at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has identified a new superbug that caused a bloodstream infection in a Brazilian patient. The report appeared in the April 17 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]

College of American Pathologists and ASC sign MOU to advance delivery of cytopathology services

The College of American Pathologists and the American Society of Cytopathology announced today the signing of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) to collaborate on initiatives to advance the delivery of cytopathology services and improve patient care. [More]
Study shows R9-caPep compound blocks PCNA actions in neuroblastoma cells

Study shows R9-caPep compound blocks PCNA actions in neuroblastoma cells

Neuroblastoma is one of the deadliest childhood cancers, accounting for 15 percent of pediatric cancer deaths. For patients with high-risk neuroblastomas, the five-year survival rate is 40 to 50 percent even with the most rigorous treatments available today. [More]
New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

Sometimes known as Kennedy's disease, spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare inherited neuromuscular disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. [More]
Freiburg researchers discover molecule that smuggles toxins from intestinal pathogens into human cells

Freiburg researchers discover molecule that smuggles toxins from intestinal pathogens into human cells

Prof. Dr. Dr. Klaus Aktories and Dr. Panagiotis Papatheodorou from the Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology of the University of Freiburg have discovered the receptor responsible for smuggling the toxin of the bacterium Clostridium perfringens into the cell. [More]
New blood test accurately detects presence of breast cancer and monitors response to treatment

New blood test accurately detects presence of breast cancer and monitors response to treatment

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have designed a blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment. [More]
New mouse model breakthrough for Alzheimer's disease research

New mouse model breakthrough for Alzheimer's disease research

Alzheimer's disease, the primary cause of dementia in the elderly, imposes a tremendous social and economic burden on modern society. In Japan, the burden of the disease in 2050 is estimated to be a half a trillion US dollars, a figure equivalent to the government's annual revenues. [More]
New data focuses on different approaches to improve diagnosis and treatment of HCC

New data focuses on different approaches to improve diagnosis and treatment of HCC

Epidemiological, genetic and clinical data presented today at the International Liver CongressTM 2014 are collectively focussed on different approaches designed to improve the diagnosis, staging and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). [More]
New technique of single-cell genomic analysis to reverse tissue engineering

New technique of single-cell genomic analysis to reverse tissue engineering

Consider the marvel of the embryo. It begins as a glob of identical cells that change shape and function as they multiply to become the cells of our lungs, muscles, nerves and all the other specialized tissues of the body. [More]

Johns Hopkins designs blood test that accurately detects presence of advanced breast cancer

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have designed a blood test that accurately detects the presence of advanced breast cancer and also holds promise for precisely monitoring response to cancer treatment. [More]

New study identifies potential target for colorectal cancer treatment

A new study identifies a molecule that is a probable driving force in colorectal cancer and suggests that the molecule could be an important target for colorectal cancer treatment and a valuable biomarker of tumor progression. [More]

Researchers investigate role of microRNAs in breast cancer cells

Metastasis — the spreading of cancer cells from a primary tumor site to other parts of the body — generally leads to poorer outcomes for patients, so oncologists and researchers are constantly seeking new ways to detect and thwart this malicious process. [More]
Genetic evidence confirms role of group of virus-fighting genes in cancer development

Genetic evidence confirms role of group of virus-fighting genes in cancer development

Researchers have found a major piece of genetic evidence that confirms the role of a group of virus-fighting genes in cancer development. [More]

UK study finds link between low vitamin D status and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in British children

A UK study investigating the link between low vitamin D status and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in British children has identified a genetic variant associated with the disease's severity. [More]

European scientists set up new therapeutic approaches to tackle gene defects

On 15th April is the 1st International Pompe Disease Day, a campaign to raise awareness of this rare but severe gene defect. Pompe Disease is only one of more than 40 metabolic disorders that mainly affect children under the age of 10, often with devastating consequences. [More]
Lin28 gene may hold clues to regeneration of damaged kidneys in adults

Lin28 gene may hold clues to regeneration of damaged kidneys in adults

​Nearly one-third of cases of Wilms tumor, a pediatric cancer of the kidney, are linked to a gene called Lin28, according to research from Boston Children's Hospital. Mice engineered to express Lin28 in their kidneys developed Wilms tumor, which regressed when Lin28 was withdrawn, indicating that strategies aimed at blocking or deactivating the gene hold therapeutic promise for children with Wilms. [More]