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A gene is a unit of heredity in a living organism. It normally resides on a stretch of DNA that codes for a type of protein or for an RNA chain that has a function in the organism. All living things depend on genes, as they specify all proteins and functional RNA chains.
Patient with severe Alzheimer's shows promising benefits during treatment with Bryostatin drug

Patient with severe Alzheimer's shows promising benefits during treatment with Bryostatin drug

Researchers at the Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute and the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine announced their findings from a new study entitled, "PSEN1 Variant in a Family with Atypical AD." An Alzheimer patient with very severe disease, genetically confirmed to have a known variant of PSEN1, showed promising benefits during treatment with the drug Bryostatin 1. [More]
Study finds link between neurodegenerative disorders and inflammation

Study finds link between neurodegenerative disorders and inflammation

Researchers from McMaster University and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York have discovered that a protein associated with neurodegenerative diseases like ALS also plays an important role in the body's natural antiviral response. [More]
CNIO researchers describe presence of MDH2 gene mutations in hereditary neuroendocrine tumors

CNIO researchers describe presence of MDH2 gene mutations in hereditary neuroendocrine tumors

Researchers in the Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre -- led by Alberto Cascón and Mercedes Robledo -- have described the presence of mutations in the MDH2 gene, in a family with very rare neuroendocrine tumours associated with a high hereditary component: pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas that affect the suprarenal and parathyroid glands (groups of chromaffin cells in the central nervous system), respectively. [More]
Merck Serono, Intrexon partner to develop and commercialize CAR-T cancer therapies

Merck Serono, Intrexon partner to develop and commercialize CAR-T cancer therapies

Merck Serono, the biopharmaceutical business of Merck, and Intrexon Corporation, today announced an exclusive strategic collaboration and license agreement to develop and commercialize Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-cell (CAR-T) cancer therapies. [More]
Big data helps discover gephyrin protein's connection in human history

Big data helps discover gephyrin protein's connection in human history

Big data: It's a term we read and hear about often, but is hard to grasp. Computer scientists at Washington University in St. Louis' School of Engineering & Applied Science tackled some big data about an important protein and discovered its connection in human history as well as clues about its role in complex neurological diseases. [More]
New faculty members join UNC Lineberger to help launch immunotherapy clinical trials

New faculty members join UNC Lineberger to help launch immunotherapy clinical trials

Two new faculty members have joined the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center to help launch groundbreaking immunotherapy clinical trials testing an experimental treatment in which patients' own immune cells are genetically engineered to fight their cancer. [More]
One round of adenosine triphosphate turnover sufficient for SNARE complex disassembly

One round of adenosine triphosphate turnover sufficient for SNARE complex disassembly

In 2013, James E. Rothman, Randy W. Schekman, and Thomas C. Südhof won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries of molecular machineries for vesicle trafficking, a major transport system in cells for maintaining cellular processes. Vesicle traffic acts as a kind of "home-delivery service" in cells. [More]
Society for Reproductive Investigation awards two top honors to Dr. Ayman Al-Hendy

Society for Reproductive Investigation awards two top honors to Dr. Ayman Al-Hendy

Dr. Ayman Al-Hendy, an obstetrician-gynecologist and molecular biologist at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University and GRHealth, has received two top honors from the Society for Reproductive Investigation. [More]
Researchers identify bio-markers that could help detect early stage colorectal cancer

Researchers identify bio-markers that could help detect early stage colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer globally and the second most common cause of cancer deaths. The chance of a cure is high if the cancer is detected early enough, but early detection is not a given. Researchers from VIB and KU Leuven - together with various European oncology centers, including UZ Leuven - have identified bio-markers that can be incorporated in a new diagnostic test. [More]
New study opens door to preventative treatments for congenital diaphragmatic hernia

New study opens door to preventative treatments for congenital diaphragmatic hernia

Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is not as well known as muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis, but like them it is a life-threatening birth defect, and is just as common. Occurring in one in 3,000 births, CDH causes the guts and liver to protrude through a defective diaphragm and into the chest cavity, where they interfere with the lungs. [More]
MDC scientists find solution to increase efficiency of precise genetic modifications

MDC scientists find solution to increase efficiency of precise genetic modifications

CRISPR-Cas9 is a powerful new tool for editing the genome. For researchers around the world, the CRISPR-Cas9 technique is an exciting innovation because it is faster and cheaper than previous methods. Now, using a molecular trick, Dr. Van Trung Chu and Professor Klaus Rajewsky of the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch and Dr. Ralf Kühn, MDC and Berlin Institute of Health, have found a solution to considerably increase the efficiency of precise genetic modifications by up to eightfold. [More]
Rare genetic mutation explains why flu can kill in rare cases

Rare genetic mutation explains why flu can kill in rare cases

Nobody likes getting the flu, but for some people, fluids and rest aren't enough. A small number of children who catch the influenza virus fall so ill they end up in the hospital — perhaps needing ventilators to breathe — even while their family and friends recover easily. New research by Rockefeller University scientists, published March 26 in Science, helps explain why: a rare genetic mutation. [More]
Genes crucial for vision multiplied in early stages of vertebrate evolution

Genes crucial for vision multiplied in early stages of vertebrate evolution

A new study from SciLifeLab at Uppsala University published in PLOS ONE shows that genes crucial for vision were multiplied in the early stages of vertebrate evolution and acquired distinct functions leading to the sophisticated mechanisms of vertebrate eyes. [More]
Experimental nanoparticle therapy speeds healing of all sorts of wounds

Experimental nanoparticle therapy speeds healing of all sorts of wounds

An experimental therapy developed by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University cut in half the time it takes to heal wounds compared to no treatment at all. Details of the therapy, which was successfully tested in mice, were published online in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. [More]
Researchers harness gene editing technique in mosquito that infects people with deadly diseases

Researchers harness gene editing technique in mosquito that infects people with deadly diseases

Traditionally, to understand how a gene functions, a scientist would breed an organism that lacks that gene - "knocking it out" - then ask how the organism has changed. Are its senses affected? Its behavior? [More]
UAB scientist explores the bone development function of runx2 gene

UAB scientist explores the bone development function of runx2 gene

Amjad Javed, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has taken a major step forward in understanding the bone development function of a gene called runx2, which could lead to future ways to speed bone healing, aid bone bioengineering, stem osteoporosis and reduce arthritis. [More]
Research: Common bacteria poised to become antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Research: Common bacteria poised to become antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Antibiotic resistance is poised to spread globally among bacteria frequently implicated in respiratory and urinary infections in hospital settings, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Study: Blood test may help diagnose Fragile X syndrome related disorders in women

Study: Blood test may help diagnose Fragile X syndrome related disorders in women

A blood test may shed new light on Fragile X syndrome related disorders in women, according to a new study published in the March 25, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Fragile X is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability and the most frequent genetic cause of autism. [More]
Women face Lymphangioleiomyomatosis risk during their childbearing years

Women face Lymphangioleiomyomatosis risk during their childbearing years

A rare and potentially deadly lung disease called Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) strikes women during their childbearing years. [More]
NCCC at Dartmouth designated again as Comprehensive Cancer Center by NCI

NCCC at Dartmouth designated again as Comprehensive Cancer Center by NCI

The National Cancer Institute has renewed its Cancer Center Support Grant to Norris Cotton Cancer Center at Dartmouth, continuing NCCC's designation as a Comprehensive Cancer Center. [More]
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