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Study uncovers new drug-gene mutation combinations that can kill cancer cells

Study uncovers new drug-gene mutation combinations that can kill cancer cells

In an effort to expand the number of cancer gene mutations that can be specifically targeted with personalized therapies, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center looked for combinations of mutated genes and drugs that together kill cancer cells. [More]
Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

Scientists discover group of genes that can help predict damage in transplanted kidney

A multicenter team of researchers led by Barbara Murphy, MD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has identified a panel of genes which can help predict whether a transplanted kidney will later develop fibrosis, an injury which can cause the organ to fail. Their results were published in the July 21 edition of Lancet. [More]
Scientists design and construct 10 large protein icosahedra to improve drug delivery

Scientists design and construct 10 large protein icosahedra to improve drug delivery

Using novel computational and biochemical approaches, scientists have accurately designed and built from scratch 10 large protein icosahedra--polyhedra with 20 faces--similar to viral capsids that carry viral DNA. [More]
New study identifies alternative route for tuberculosis infection

New study identifies alternative route for tuberculosis infection

Researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a new way that tuberculosis bacteria get into the body, revealing a potential therapeutic angle to explore. [More]
Researchers unveil engineered protein to suppress cancer-promoting message within cells

Researchers unveil engineered protein to suppress cancer-promoting message within cells

Over a century of research has shined light on the once-murky innards of our cells, from the genes that serve as our "blueprints" to the proteins and other molecules that are our cellular taskmasters. [More]
New study reports strains of chimpanzee-carried SIVs can infect human cells

New study reports strains of chimpanzee-carried SIVs can infect human cells

No one knows exactly how it happened. It may have entered through a cut or bite wound, the blood of a chimpanzee seeping into an exposed fingertip or forearm or foot. [More]
Researchers identify important therapeutic target for small cell lung cancer

Researchers identify important therapeutic target for small cell lung cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a protein termed ASCL1 that is essential to the development of small cell lung cancer and that, when deleted in the lungs of mice, prevents the cancer from forming. [More]
Key gene controls ability of adult stem cells to regenerate muscle after injury, study finds

Key gene controls ability of adult stem cells to regenerate muscle after injury, study finds

A key gene enables the repair of injured muscle throughout life. This is the finding of a study in mice led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and the University of Colorado at Boulder, and published online July 21 in Cell Reports. [More]
Study highlights role of BCL11A gene in intellectual disability syndrome

Study highlights role of BCL11A gene in intellectual disability syndrome

Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics have found a gene responsible for an intellectual disability disorder and proven how it works. [More]
Huntington's disease monkey model embodies full array of symptoms similar to human patients

Huntington's disease monkey model embodies full array of symptoms similar to human patients

Transgenic Huntington's disease monkeys display a full spectrum of symptoms resembling the human disease, ranging from motor problems and neurodegeneration to emotional dysregulation and immune system changes, scientists at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University report. [More]
Shared lifestyle and environment may contribute to risk of common diseases in families, study shows

Shared lifestyle and environment may contribute to risk of common diseases in families, study shows

Family history of disease may be as much the result of shared lifestyle and surroundings as inherited genes, research has shown. [More]
New study sheds light on pathogenesis of DNA lesions present in leukemia

New study sheds light on pathogenesis of DNA lesions present in leukemia

Researchers have succeeded in shedding light on the pathogenesis of DNA breakpoints that are associated with leukemia. [More]
Enhancers can boost frequency of transcriptional bursting, study shows

Enhancers can boost frequency of transcriptional bursting, study shows

A new study by researchers at Princeton University suggests that sporadic bursts of gene activity may be important features of genetic regulation rather than just occasional mishaps. [More]
Researchers find dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria in wastewater from broken sewer lines

Researchers find dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria in wastewater from broken sewer lines

University of South Florida researchers investigating the aftermath of a September, 2014 sewer line break in St. Petersburg, Florida, have found dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the untreated wastewater that gushed into neighborhoods and into Boca Ciega Bay at a rate of 250 to 500 gallons per minute. [More]
New virus-based method opens wide range of options to treat various diseases

New virus-based method opens wide range of options to treat various diseases

The ability to switch disease-causing genes on and off remains a dream for many physicians, research scientists and patients. [More]
Scientists capture atomic level snapshots of how key enzyme modifies signaling proteins

Scientists capture atomic level snapshots of how key enzyme modifies signaling proteins

Scientists have captured atomic level snapshots showing how one key enzyme modifies a protein involved in turning genes on or off inside cells. Understanding this process-which is particularly important when cells are first taking on specialized identities such as nerve cells, muscle, skin, and so on-helps explain how complex organisms can arise from a finite number of genes. [More]
Identifying new pathway of EZH2 gene may lead to targeted therapies for aggressive breast cancer

Identifying new pathway of EZH2 gene may lead to targeted therapies for aggressive breast cancer

Scientists from A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore and the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore came together to understand how EZH2, a cancer-promoting gene which is known to be involved in many types of cancers, is activated in breast cancer and lymphomas. [More]
Scientists identify marker that subdivides insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas

Scientists identify marker that subdivides insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas

The marker Flattop subdivides the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas into those that maintain glucose metabolism and into immature cells that divide more frequently and adapt to metabolic changes. [More]
Novel biomarkers may offer solution for detecting autologous blood transfusion in athletes

Novel biomarkers may offer solution for detecting autologous blood transfusion in athletes

Increasing oxygen delivery to muscles can help athletes perform better and give them the edge needed to win elite competitions. One of the best ways to increase oxygen supply is through blood manipulation, undergoing a blood transfusion that provides extra red blood cells and boosts oxygen levels. [More]
Scientists explore black box of genome biology

Scientists explore black box of genome biology

Scientists at Florida State University, Baylor College of Medicine and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT have broken ground in a little-understood area of human genetics. [More]
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