Genes News and Research RSS Feed - Genes News and Research

Mistakes in mismatch repair genes may accurately predict response to certain immunotherapy drugs

Mistakes in mismatch repair genes may accurately predict response to certain immunotherapy drugs

In a report of a proof-of-principle study of patients with colon and other cancers for whom standard therapies failed, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say that mistakes in so-called mismatch repair genes, first identified by Johns Hopkins and other scientists two decades ago, may accurately predict who will respond to certain immunotherapy drugs known as PD-1 inhibitors. Such drugs aim to disarm systems developed by cancer cells to evade detection and destruction by immune system cells. [More]
KeyGenes platform could be useful for testing quality of stem cell transplants

KeyGenes platform could be useful for testing quality of stem cell transplants

A snapshot of gene activity is now all that's necessary to determine what organ or tissue type that a cluster of fetal stem cells will ultimately become. An algorithm developed by a team of Dutch scientists makes it possible to match what's happening inside of an immature stem cell to known human fetal cell gene expression, thus identifying what the stem cell has the potential to be. [More]
Presence of collagen in tumor microenvironment can be either good or bad

Presence of collagen in tumor microenvironment can be either good or bad

The presence of collagen in the tumor microenvironment, essentially where the tumor lives, can be either good or bad according to Constance Brinckerhoff, PhD who led the Dartmouth team's reporting of "The BRAFV600E inhibitor, PLX4032, increases type 1 collagen synthesis in melanoma cells," in Matrix Biology Journal. [More]
2015 EuroHeartCare annual meeting to highlight recent advances in cardiovascular nursing research, practice

2015 EuroHeartCare annual meeting to highlight recent advances in cardiovascular nursing research, practice

The cardiovascular nursing event of the year is heading south to Croatia. EuroHeartCare is the official annual meeting of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). [More]
Researchers uncover critical role for two proteins in chromatin structure

Researchers uncover critical role for two proteins in chromatin structure

A team of researchers at the IRCM led by Fran├žois Robert, PhD, uncovered a critical role for two proteins in chromatin structure. Their breakthrough, recently published in the scientific journal Molecular Cell, helps explain how DNA is organized in our cells. This discovery could lead to a better understanding of what causes certain types of cancer, such as lymphoma. [More]
Multiplatform biomarker analysis reveals new therapeutic options for squamous cell anal carcinomas

Multiplatform biomarker analysis reveals new therapeutic options for squamous cell anal carcinomas

While squamous cell anal carcinomas are rare, representing only about 2% of digestive-system cancer diagnoses, these cancers, which are associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV), sometimes prove very difficult to treat, recurring or developing metastases following standard treatment. [More]
Study suggests race-specific equations to aid clinicians better calculate warfarin dosage

Study suggests race-specific equations to aid clinicians better calculate warfarin dosage

A new report demonstrates that clinical and genetic factors affecting dose requirements for warfarin vary by race. The study, published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology, proposes race-specific equations to help clinicians better calculate warfarin dosage. [More]
UB researchers successfully harness E. coli to generate new forms of antibiotics

UB researchers successfully harness E. coli to generate new forms of antibiotics

Like a dairy farmer tending to a herd of cows to produce milk, researchers are tending to colonies of the bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) to produce new forms of antibiotics -- including three that show promise in fighting drug-resistant bacteria. [More]
Myriad Genetics to highlight new clinical studies on myRisk Hereditary Cancer test at ASCO 2015

Myriad Genetics to highlight new clinical studies on myRisk Hereditary Cancer test at ASCO 2015

Myriad Genetics, Inc. today announced it will highlight several new clinical studies on its myRisk Hereditary Cancer molecular diagnostic test at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting being held in Chicago, Ill. [More]
SNPs predict sunitinib outcome in mRCC

SNPs predict sunitinib outcome in mRCC

Research has confirmed that single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes related to the processing of sunitinib influence the outcome of treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. [More]
Larger studies needed to validate multigene testing for prediction of breast cancer risk

Larger studies needed to validate multigene testing for prediction of breast cancer risk

While advances in technology have made multigene testing, or "panel testing," for genetic mutations that increase the risk of breast or other cancers an option, authors of a review published today in the New England Journal of Medicine say larger studies are needed in order to provide reliable risk estimates for counseling these patients. [More]
Differences in brain expression of RORA protein levels may lead to sex bias in autism

Differences in brain expression of RORA protein levels may lead to sex bias in autism

George Washington University researcher Valerie Hu, Ph.D., has found an important sex-dependent difference in the level of RORA protein in brain tissues of males and females. Specifically, females without autism have a slightly higher level of RORA in the frontal cortex of the brain than males without autism, while the levels of the protein are comparably lower in the brain of both males and females with autism. [More]
New TB-Profiler tool to find appropriate drugs for TB patients may improve likelihood of cure

New TB-Profiler tool to find appropriate drugs for TB patients may improve likelihood of cure

Finding out what drugs can be used to treat a patient with tuberculosis (TB) can be sped up by days or weeks, thanks to a new free online tool. The new TB-Profiler tool, developed by a team of scientists led by Dr Taane Clark at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, analyses and interprets genome sequence data to predict resistance to 11 drugs used for the treatment of TB. [More]
DNA analysis reveals how ovarian cancer takes genetic twists and turns to outsmart chemotherapy

DNA analysis reveals how ovarian cancer takes genetic twists and turns to outsmart chemotherapy

The largest complete DNA analysis of ovarian cancer in the world, published overnight in Nature, has revealed unprecedented new insight into the genetic twists and turns a deadly form of the disease takes to outsmart chemotherapy, potentially changing treatment approaches for women around the world. [More]
Investigating epigenetic marks in ancient DNA could help understand health of ancient populations

Investigating epigenetic marks in ancient DNA could help understand health of ancient populations

A new study by anthropologists from The University of Texas at Austin shows for the first time that epigenetic marks on DNA can be detected in a large number of ancient human remains, which may lead to further understanding about the effects of famine and disease in the ancient world. [More]
Penn State to receive $1.84 million over five years to explore craniosynostosis

Penn State to receive $1.84 million over five years to explore craniosynostosis

Penn State will receive $1.84 million over five years as a subcontract on a National Institutes of Health grant through the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, N.Y., to explore craniosynostosis, a birth defect that includes facial and cranial dysmorphology. [More]
Amway releases BodyKey by Nutrilite tool that uses genetic test to determine weight management approach

Amway releases BodyKey by Nutrilite tool that uses genetic test to determine weight management approach

When it comes to choosing a weight management plan, research shows that one size does not fit all. That's why Amway introduced BodyKey by Nutrilite, a weight management program that uses a genetic test or a comprehensive assessment based on validated science to help consumers determine an ideal weight management approach. [More]
Researchers use animal models to study how dysfunction of genes contributes to ASD risk

Researchers use animal models to study how dysfunction of genes contributes to ASD risk

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurological condition that affects approximately two percent of people around the world. Although several genes have been linked to multiple concurring conditions of ASD, the process that explains how specific genetic variants lead to behaviors characteristic of the disorder remains elusive. [More]
Strand Life Sciences to launch expanded StrandAdvantage pan-cancer genomic profiling service at ASCO 2015

Strand Life Sciences to launch expanded StrandAdvantage pan-cancer genomic profiling service at ASCO 2015

Strand Life Sciences, a global genomic profiling company that uses next generation sequencing technology to empower cancer care, today announced it will introduce its expanded StrandAdvantage pan-cancer genomic profiling service later this month at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago. [More]
New genetic models allow for comprehensive analysis of drivers for osteosarcoma

New genetic models allow for comprehensive analysis of drivers for osteosarcoma

New models developed at the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota reveal the genes and pathways that, when altered, can cause osteosarcoma. The information could be used to better target treatments for the often-deadly type of cancer. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement