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Researchers show how genetic modification of mouse strains complicate biomedical research interpretation

Researchers show how genetic modification of mouse strains complicate biomedical research interpretation

Investigators affiliated with VIB and UGent recently achieved great success with a study involving biomedical research on mouse models. [More]
Vital molecular mechanism in plants has similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans

Vital molecular mechanism in plants has similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans

Scientists at Van Andel Research Institute have revealed an important molecular mechanism in plants that has significant similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans, which are closely linked to early embryonic development and to diseases such as cancer. [More]
York scientists identify how some micro-RNAs can make prostate cancers resistant to radiotherapy

York scientists identify how some micro-RNAs can make prostate cancers resistant to radiotherapy

Scientists at the University of York believe they have identified how some tiny regulatory molecules in cells can make prostate cancers resistant to radiotherapy. [More]
New study reveals protein's critical role in development and progression of AML

New study reveals protein's critical role in development and progression of AML

A new study by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine reveals a protein's critical - and previously unknown -- role in the development and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a fast-growing and extremely difficult-to-treat blood cancer. [More]
Case Western cancer researchers develop algorithm to detect DNA copy-number alterations in tumors

Case Western cancer researchers develop algorithm to detect DNA copy-number alterations in tumors

An algorithm dubbed ENVE could be the Google for genetic aberrations — and it comes from Case Western Reserve. [More]
Breakthrough reveals influence of schizophrenia’s 'Rosetta Stone' gene in brain development

Breakthrough reveals influence of schizophrenia’s 'Rosetta Stone' gene in brain development

Scientists have identified a critical function of what they believe to be schizophrenia's "Rosetta Stone" gene that could hold the key to decoding the function of all genes involved in the disease. [More]
Researchers find way to reverse clotting factor deficiency that triggers hemophilia A

Researchers find way to reverse clotting factor deficiency that triggers hemophilia A

Sufferers of hemophilia live in a perpetual state of stress and anxiety: their joints wear down prematurely and they have bleeding episodes that feel like they will never end. Their bodies lack the ability to make the clotting factor responsible for the coagulation of blood so any cut or bruise can turn into an emergency without immediate treatment. [More]
Groundbreaking experimental therapy has ability to suppress ulcerative colitis

Groundbreaking experimental therapy has ability to suppress ulcerative colitis

UCLA scientists have discovered a groundbreaking experimental therapy that has the ability to suppress the development of ulcerative colitis (UC), a disease which causes inflammation in the digestive tract and colon cancer. The treatment utilizes a chemical inhibitor able to block an RNA molecule (microRNA-214) involved in the transmission of genetic information. [More]
Moffitt researchers develop genetic test that analyzes sensitivity of tumors to radiation therapy

Moffitt researchers develop genetic test that analyzes sensitivity of tumors to radiation therapy

Recent advances in the understanding of cancer have led to more personalized therapies, such as drugs that target particular proteins and tests that analyze gene expression patterns in tumors to predict a patient's response to therapy. [More]
New Histone Antibody Specificity Database allows scientists to find right antibodies for biomedical research

New Histone Antibody Specificity Database allows scientists to find right antibodies for biomedical research

For years, a crisis has been brewing in molecular biology. The problem is that antibodies--research tools used to identify key proteins at work in a cell--aren't always what they seem. Unreliable antibodies have led to numerous instances of false findings, failed experiments, and wasted money and samples. [More]
Scientists discover genetic markers for mosquito resistance to insecticides

Scientists discover genetic markers for mosquito resistance to insecticides

Controlling mosquitoes that carry human diseases is a global health challenge as their ability to resist insecticides now threatens efforts to prevent epidemics. Scientists from the CNRS, IRD, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université Joseph Fourier in Grenoble and Institut Pasteur in French Guiana have identified new genetic markers for mosquito resistance to insecticides, which could improve its detection in the field. [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers study HDAC inhibitors to find effective treatments for anaplastic thyroid cancer

Mayo Clinic researchers study HDAC inhibitors to find effective treatments for anaplastic thyroid cancer

In their bid to find the best combination of therapies to treat anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), researchers on Mayo Clinic's Florida campus demonstrated that all histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are not created equal. [More]
New interactive tool helps researchers explore genetic underpinnings of cancer

New interactive tool helps researchers explore genetic underpinnings of cancer

Brown University computer scientists have developed a new interactive tool to help researchers and clinicians explore the genetic underpinnings of cancer. [More]
Deep Genomics set to bring the power of deep learning technologies to genomics

Deep Genomics set to bring the power of deep learning technologies to genomics

Evolution has altered the human genome over hundreds of thousands of years -- and now humans can do it in a matter of months. [More]
Researchers use gene-editing technique involving low-dose irradiation to repair human stem cells

Researchers use gene-editing technique involving low-dose irradiation to repair human stem cells

For the first time, researchers have employed a gene-editing technique involving low-dose irradiation to repair patient cells, according to a study published in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine. This method, developed by researchers in the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute, is 10 times more effective than techniques currently in use. [More]
Infants born with mutation in PLVAP gene develop severe protein losing enteropathy

Infants born with mutation in PLVAP gene develop severe protein losing enteropathy

Newborn children born with a mutation in the Plasmalemma Vesicle Associated Protein (PLVAP) gene develop severe protein losing enteropathy, according to a case study1 published in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Genetic variation influences survival in patients with multiple myeloma

Genetic variation influences survival in patients with multiple myeloma

As part of a multi-institutional effort, researchers with Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have found that multiple myeloma patients with a genetic variation in the gene FOPNL die on average 1-3 years sooner than patients without it. [More]
Multi-year project aims to develop, improve clinical research tools for studying ASD

Multi-year project aims to develop, improve clinical research tools for studying ASD

Government, non-profit, and other private partners will fund a multi-year project to develop and improve clinical research tools for studying autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The project will receive a total of $28 million over the next four years to test and refine clinical measures of social impairment in ASD in order to better evaluate potential behavioral and drug therapies. [More]
Study identifies new culprit in Alzheimer's disease development

Study identifies new culprit in Alzheimer's disease development

A recent study conducted at Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research and NYU Langone Medical Center implicates a new culprit in Alzheimer's disease development. The research reveals that ßCTF -- the precursor of the amyloid beta (Aß) peptide -- acts at the earliest stage of Alzheimer's to initiate a range of abnormalities leading to the loss of groups of neurons critical for memory formation. [More]
New TripAdvisor-style website launched to help researchers choose better tools for biomedical research

New TripAdvisor-style website launched to help researchers choose better tools for biomedical research

An international panel of leading scientists is launching a new TripAdvisor-style website aimed at helping researchers choose better-quality research tools - and avoiding potentially serious errors in biomedical research. [More]
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