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Antifungal drug resistance evoked through RNAi-dependent epimutations

Antifungal drug resistance evoked through RNAi-dependent epimutations

Microorganisms like bacteria and fungi can evade treatment by acquiring mutations in the genes targeted by antibiotics or antifungal drugs. [More]
Scientists find high proportion of oral bacteria in gut microbiota of liver cirrhosis patients

Scientists find high proportion of oral bacteria in gut microbiota of liver cirrhosis patients

Scientists from INRA in collaboration with a Chinese team found that the gut microbiota[1] of individuals with liver cirrhosis differ notably from healthy individuals', showing a high proportion of oral bacteria. [More]
Xbp1s protein plays key role in brain regions to regulate metabolism

Xbp1s protein plays key role in brain regions to regulate metabolism

A protein that controls when genes are switched on or off plays a key role in specific areas of the brain to regulate metabolism, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found. [More]
Researchers examine effects of bacteria in fighting against obesity

Researchers examine effects of bacteria in fighting against obesity

A probiotic that prevents obesity could be on the horizon. Bacteria that produce a therapeutic compound in the gut inhibit weight gain, insulin resistance and other adverse effects of a high-fat diet in mice, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. [More]
Scientists discover new pathway to manipulate, maintain human ESCs in a "na-ve"

Scientists discover new pathway to manipulate, maintain human ESCs in a "na-ve"

For years, researchers and patients have hoped that embryonic stem cells (ESCs)-capable of forming nearly any cell type in the body-could provide insight into numerous diseases perhaps even be used to treat them. Yet progress has been hampered by the inability to transfer research and tools from mouse ESC studies to their human counterparts, in part because human ESCs are "primed" and slightly less plastic than the mouse cells. [More]
Genetics involved with menarche may hold keys to preventing diabetes or osteoporosis in later life

Genetics involved with menarche may hold keys to preventing diabetes or osteoporosis in later life

A novel study shows that the age girls reach puberty is influenced by 'imprinted genes'-a subset of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent contributes the gene. [More]
Epigenetic switch can cause cancer, shows study

Epigenetic switch can cause cancer, shows study

Cancer has long been thought to be primarily a genetic disease, but in recent decades scientists have come to believe that epigenetic changes - which don't change the DNA sequence but how it is 'read' - also play a role in cancer. [More]
Study identifies molecular mechanisms could lead to new therapies to treat obesity, diabetes

Study identifies molecular mechanisms could lead to new therapies to treat obesity, diabetes

A protein that controls when genes are switched on or off plays a key role in specific areas of the brain to regulate metabolism, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found. [More]
Children who experience stress early in life have emotional, physical health problems

Children who experience stress early in life have emotional, physical health problems

Children who have been abused or neglected early in life are at risk for developing both emotional and physical health problems. [More]
Protein once seen as promising anti-cancer compound helps to stabilize neural circuits

Protein once seen as promising anti-cancer compound helps to stabilize neural circuits

Researchers at UC San Francisco (UCSF) have discovered that endostatin, a protein that once aroused intense interest as a possible cancer treatment, plays a key role in the stable functioning of the nervous system. [More]
Antioxidant biomaterial helps vascular grafts heal

Antioxidant biomaterial helps vascular grafts heal

When a foreign material like a medical device or surgical implant is put inside the human body, the body always responds. According to Northwestern University's Guillermo Ameer, most of the time, that response can be negative and affect the device's function. [More]
Study identifies three genetic changes linked to increased risk of breast cancer in East Asian women

Study identifies three genetic changes linked to increased risk of breast cancer in East Asian women

A new study in East Asian women has identified three genetic changes linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. The research, led by Vanderbilt University investigators, was published online July 20 in Nature Genetics. [More]
Age of sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes in girls

Age of sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes in girls

The age at which girls reach sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes, a small sub-set of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent passes on that gene, according to new research published today in the journal Nature. [More]
More genetic suspects for schizophrenia brought to light

More genetic suspects for schizophrenia brought to light

A meta-analysis from the Schizophrenia Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium has revealed a large number of previously unreported genetic loci that may have a role in schizophrenia. [More]
Cedars-Sinai investigators developing novel treatment for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

Cedars-Sinai investigators developing novel treatment for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

Investigators at the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute are developing a novel, multistep investigational treatment for one of the most complex and difficult-to-treat forms of the disease, locally advanced pancreatic cancer. [More]
Vanderbilt-led research team identifies protein "signatures" that drive colorectal cancer

Vanderbilt-led research team identifies protein "signatures" that drive colorectal cancer

A Vanderbilt University-led research team has identified protein "signatures" of genetic mutations that drive colorectal cancer, the nation's second leading cause of cancer deaths after lung cancer. [More]
Research findings could lead to new approaches for treating schizophrenia

Research findings could lead to new approaches for treating schizophrenia

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date, conducted with 80,000 people. [More]
Study reveals novel epilepsy pathway linked to neurodegenerative diseases

Study reveals novel epilepsy pathway linked to neurodegenerative diseases

A recent scientific discovery showed that mutations in prickle genes cause epilepsy, which in humans is a brain disorder characterized by repeated seizures over time. However, the mechanism responsible for generating prickle-associated seizures was unknown. [More]
Study suggests possible link between immune system and schizophrenia

Study suggests possible link between immune system and schizophrenia

Nancy Buccola, MSN, APRN, PMHCNS-BC, CNE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Nursing, contributed samples used in a study reporting new locations of genetic material associated with schizophrenia and also suggesting a possible link between the immune system and schizophrenia. [More]
Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Researchers have identified a population of clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells positive for the CTR2 marker that possess some stem-cell-like features and are able to induce an angiogenic response in vivo. [More]