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Genetic changes in patients with Crohn's disease could hold clues to fighting illness

Genetic changes in patients with Crohn's disease could hold clues to fighting illness

Genetic changes that occur in patients with the bowel condition Crohn's disease could hold clues to fighting the illness. [More]
Scientists find that DNA repair drug could help treat leukaemia, other cancers

Scientists find that DNA repair drug could help treat leukaemia, other cancers

A team of scientists led by Research Associate Professor Motomi Osato and Professor Yoshiaki Ito from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore found that a drug originally designed for killing a limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could potentially be used to treat leukaemia and other cancers. [More]
Protein p66ShcA shows promise as biomarker to identify breast cancers with poor prognoses

Protein p66ShcA shows promise as biomarker to identify breast cancers with poor prognoses

A protein named p66ShcA shows promise as a biomarker to identify breast cancers with poor prognoses, according to research published ahead of print in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biology. [More]
Spanish scientists explore genetic basis of familial extreme longevity

Spanish scientists explore genetic basis of familial extreme longevity

In a recent report in Aging Cell, a multidisciplinary team of Spanish scientists, led by Tim Cash and Manuel Serrano at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, identify rare variants in the APOB gene in several families where exceptional longevity (>100 years of age) appears to cluster. [More]
Drug to kill limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could treat leukaemia

Drug to kill limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could treat leukaemia

A team of scientists led by Research Associate Professor Motomi Osato and Professor Yoshiaki Ito from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) found that a drug originally designed for killing a limited type of cancer cells with DNA repair defects could potentially be used to treat leukaemia and other cancers. [More]
Female rats whose great grandparents exposed to toxins become more vulnerable to stress

Female rats whose great grandparents exposed to toxins become more vulnerable to stress

Scientists have known that toxic effects of substances known as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), found in both natural and human-made materials, can pass from one generation to the next, but new research shows that females with ancestral exposure to EDC may show especially adverse reactions to stress. [More]
Researchers develop new integrated approach to pinpoint genetic "drivers" of cancer

Researchers develop new integrated approach to pinpoint genetic "drivers" of cancer

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have developed a new integrated approach to pinpoint the genetic "drivers" of cancer, uncovering eight genes that could be viable for targeted breast cancer therapy. [More]
Study sheds light on direct causal relationship between smoking and mortality

Study sheds light on direct causal relationship between smoking and mortality

It is a fact that smoking is harmful and associated with deadly diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. [More]
Statistical genetic analysis can detect aggressiveness of lymphoma

Statistical genetic analysis can detect aggressiveness of lymphoma

Each year, more than one thousand Norwegians develop lymphoma. A statistical genetic analysis can detect when the disease will be aggressive. Thereby, treatment can be initiated in time. [More]
Study finds a host of new clues on gene-environment interactions in Crohn's disease

Study finds a host of new clues on gene-environment interactions in Crohn's disease

A new study finds a wide range of epigenetic changes-alterations in DNA across the genome that may be related to key environmental exposures-in children with Crohn's disease (CD), reports Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, official journal of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. [More]
Study: Low birth weight may put African American women at higher risk for type 2 diabetes

Study: Low birth weight may put African American women at higher risk for type 2 diabetes

African American women born at a low or very low birth weight may be at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The findings, which appear in Diabetes Care, may explain in part the higher occurrence of type 2 diabetes in African American populations, which has a high prevalence of low birth weight. [More]
Study shows new role for protein APC in suppressing colorectal cancer

Study shows new role for protein APC in suppressing colorectal cancer

A study recently published in the journal Carcinogenesis by researchers at the University of Kansas shows a new role for the protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) in suppressing colorectal cancer - the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. [More]
Children and adolescents with autism have surplus of synapses in brain

Children and adolescents with autism have surplus of synapses in brain

Children and adolescents with autism have a surplus of synapses in the brain, and this excess is due to a slowdown in a normal brain "pruning" process during development, according to a study by neuroscientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). [More]
DNA testing for congenital cataracts can accurately diagnose diseases linked to childhood blindness

DNA testing for congenital cataracts can accurately diagnose diseases linked to childhood blindness

Researchers in the United Kingdom have demonstrated that advanced DNA testing for congenital cataracts can quickly and accurately diagnose a number of rare diseases marked by childhood blindness, according to a study published online today in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. [More]
Study identifies protein that appears to play key role in protecting people infected with tuberculosis

Study identifies protein that appears to play key role in protecting people infected with tuberculosis

UCLA-led study has identified a protein that appears to play a key role in protecting people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis — the bacterium that causes tuberculosis — from developing the active form of the disease. [More]
Deep sequencing technique opens up new possibilities for finding genetic causes for brain disorder

Deep sequencing technique opens up new possibilities for finding genetic causes for brain disorder

Not every cell in the body is the same genetically, and disease-causing mutations don't necessarily affect every cell—making these mutations easy to miss even with next-generation genomic sequencing. [More]
Researchers identify mutated forms of gene that encodes unregulated enzyme driving CML

Researchers identify mutated forms of gene that encodes unregulated enzyme driving CML

Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah have identified and characterized mutated forms of the gene that encodes BCR-ABL, the unregulated enzyme driving the blood cancer chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). [More]
Researchers focus on how exposure to opioids may alter expression of OPRM1 gene

Researchers focus on how exposure to opioids may alter expression of OPRM1 gene

Some infants born with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) secondary to in-utero opioid exposure have a more difficult time going through withdrawal than others, but the underlying reasons are not well understood. [More]
Analysis of Candida glabrata fungus mutations reveals new genes that confer anti-fungal tolerance

Analysis of Candida glabrata fungus mutations reveals new genes that confer anti-fungal tolerance

A group of researchers at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories has created one of the three world's largest gene libraries for the Candida glabrata yeast, which is harmful to humans. [More]
Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Study examines national impact of newborn screening test for SCID

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a potentially life-threatening, but treatable, disorder affecting infants, is twice as common as previously believed, according to a new study that is the first to examine the national impact of this newborn screening test. [More]