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Frederick Alt honored with 2015 Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research

Frederick Alt honored with 2015 Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research

Frederick Alt, PhD, director of the Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine at Boston Children's Hospital, has been honored with the 2015 Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research. [More]
Texas Biomed scientists awarded NIH grant to develop potential HPV-based HIV vaccine

Texas Biomed scientists awarded NIH grant to develop potential HPV-based HIV vaccine

Scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute have begun work on a nearly $3.4 million study funded by the National Institutes of Health over the next four years to create an attenuated, or weakened, virus that is a hybrid of the papilloma virus and the human immunodeficiency virus, with the potential to jumpstart a body's immune response to develop antibodies against both viruses. [More]
UTHealth scientists use new methods to explore naturally occurring 'knockout humans'

UTHealth scientists use new methods to explore naturally occurring 'knockout humans'

Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston are helping to make precision medicine a reality by sequencing entire exomes of people to assess chronic disease risk and drug efficacy. The results of a study on this topic were published in Nature Genetics on Monday. [More]
Study finds that gene therapy can clip out genetic material associated with heart failure

Study finds that gene therapy can clip out genetic material associated with heart failure

Gene therapy can clip out genetic material linked to heart failure and replace it with the normal gene in human cardiac cells, according to a study led by researchers from the Cardiovascular Research Center at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
New device can turn smartphone into DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope

New device can turn smartphone into DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope

If you thought scanning one of those strange, square QR codes with your phone was somewhat advanced, hold on to your seat. Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles have recently developed a device that can turn any smartphone into a DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope. [More]
Link between dDsk2 protein and neurodegenerative diseases identified

Link between dDsk2 protein and neurodegenerative diseases identified

Until today, the proteins known as ubiquitin receptors have been associated mainly with protein degradation, a basic cell cleaning process. A new function now described for the protein dDsk2 by the team headed by Ferran Azorín, group leader at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and CSIC research professor, links ubiquitin receptors for the first time with the regulation of gene expression. [More]
Researchers discover key mechanism in neural death that causes Parkinson's disease

Researchers discover key mechanism in neural death that causes Parkinson's disease

In studying the molecular biology of brain development, a team of researchers led by Ludwig Stockholm director Thomas Perlmann has discovered how disruption of a developmental mechanism alters the very nerve cells that are most affected in Parkinson's disease. [More]
New TSRI study points to promising new therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease

New TSRI study points to promising new therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease

Taking a new approach, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have uncovered some surprising details of a group of compounds that have shown significant potential in stimulating the growth of brain cells and memory restoration in animal models that mimic Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Scientists reveal complex role of soy in preventing and advancing breast cancer

Scientists reveal complex role of soy in preventing and advancing breast cancer

Scientists have mapped the human genes triggered by the phytonutrients in soy, revealing the complex role the legume plays in both preventing and advancing breast cancer. [More]
New genetic mutation appears to protect people from Type 2 diabetes

New genetic mutation appears to protect people from Type 2 diabetes

An international team of scientists led by a Cedars-Sinai researcher has identified a new genetic mutation that appears to protect people from developing Type 2 diabetes. [More]

Research findings may help identify genes that trigger BWS in humans

Humans and cattle share a similar epigenetic fetal overgrowth disorder that occurs more commonly following assisted reproduction procedures. In humans, this disorder is called Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), and in cattle it is called large offspring syndrome (LOS) and can result in the overgrowth of fetuses and enlarged babies. [More]
Children with peanut allergies safer at school than at home

Children with peanut allergies safer at school than at home

Children who are allergic to peanuts are far more likely to be exposed to them in their own homes that at school, says University of Montreal's Sabrine Cherkaoui. Cherkaoui and her colleagues at McGill University came to the discovery after reviewing the circumstances surrounding 567 incidents of accidental peanut exposure to allergic children. [More]
New T1D Prevention Initiative launched to identify pathways to prevent type 1 diabetes

New T1D Prevention Initiative launched to identify pathways to prevent type 1 diabetes

As the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) rises worldwide, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust today announced the launch of an ambitious new T1D Prevention Initiative to investigate the early stages of development of the disease and identify new pathways to prevent it. [More]
WCH researchers identify new breast cancer gene

WCH researchers identify new breast cancer gene

A new breast cancer gene has been identified in a study led by Women's College Hospital researcher Dr. Mohammad Akbari, who is also an assistant professor with the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. [More]
Study suggests that inhibiting FOXO1 protein could speed diabetic wound healing

Study suggests that inhibiting FOXO1 protein could speed diabetic wound healing

A protein that normally fosters tissue repair instead acts to inhibit healing when sugar levels are high, according to a study in The Journal of Cell Biology. The role reversal helps explain why wounds heal slowly in people with diabetes. [More]
Yale researchers successfully correct gene mutation that causes cystic fibrosis

Yale researchers successfully correct gene mutation that causes cystic fibrosis

Yale researchers successfully corrected the most common mutation in the gene that causes cystic fibrosis, a lethal genetic disorder. The study was published April 27 in Nature Communications. [More]
Resverlogix, Hepalink announce equity investment and license agreement for RVX-208

Resverlogix, Hepalink announce equity investment and license agreement for RVX-208

Resverlogix Corp. today announced that it has entered into a Framework Agreement which sets forth the principal business terms for an equity investment and a license of RVX-208, for all indications, to Shenzhen Hepalink Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. for China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macau (the "Territories"). [More]
Common diabetes medication causes intersex in fish

Common diabetes medication causes intersex in fish

A medication commonly taken for Type II diabetes, which is being found in freshwater systems worldwide, has been shown to cause intersex in fish -male fish that produce eggs. [More]
Scientists discover new way to control inflammation during worm infections and allergies

Scientists discover new way to control inflammation during worm infections and allergies

Research from The University of Manchester is bringing scientists a step closer to developing new therapies for controlling the body's response to allergies and parasitic worm infections. [More]
Study explores innovative approach to identifying successful treatment for HER2+ breast cancer

Study explores innovative approach to identifying successful treatment for HER2+ breast cancer

Ahmad M. Khalil, PhD, knew the odds were against him -- as in thousands upon thousands to one. Yet he and his team never wavered from their quest to identify the parts of the body responsible for revving up one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer, HER2+. This month in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, Khalil and his colleagues at Case Western Reserve University proved the power of persistence; from a pool of more than 30,000 possibilities, they found 38 genes and molecules that most likely trigger HER2+ cancer cells to spread. [More]
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