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Imran Noorani receives Brainlab Community Neurosurgery Abstract Award at 2016 CNS annual meeting

Imran Noorani receives Brainlab Community Neurosurgery Abstract Award at 2016 CNS annual meeting

Imran Noorani MD, MRCS, of Cambridge, England, received the Brainlab Community Neurosurgery Abstract Award at the Congress of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting in San Diego. [More]
Researchers aim to discover new treatments for triple-negative breast cancer

Researchers aim to discover new treatments for triple-negative breast cancer

The precision medicine approach involving DNA sequencing to pinpoint specific alterations that can be targeted with anti-cancer therapies is becoming an alternate treatment avenue for those with poor-responding cancers. [More]
Scientists identify molecule in liver cells that regulates release of fats into the bloodstream

Scientists identify molecule in liver cells that regulates release of fats into the bloodstream

ETH researchers have discovered a molecule in liver cells that controls the release of fat into the bloodstream. This "lock keeper" is present in large quantities in overweight people and leads indirectly to vascular narrowing. [More]
Researchers link RHOX gene mutations to infertility in men

Researchers link RHOX gene mutations to infertility in men

The underlying cause of male infertility is unknown for 30 percent of cases. In a pair of new studies, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine determined that the reproductive homeobox (RHOX) family of transcription factors — regulatory proteins that activate some genes and inactivate others — drive the development of stem cells in the testes in mice. [More]
Researchers identify process in the brains of mice that may explain repetitive actions in Rett patients

Researchers identify process in the brains of mice that may explain repetitive actions in Rett patients

Three-year-old Naomi slaps her forehead a few times, bites her fingers and toddles across the doctor's office in her white and pink pajamas before turning her head into a door with a dull thud. [More]
Study suggests calorie-restricted diet can protect mice from abdominal aortic aneurysms

Study suggests calorie-restricted diet can protect mice from abdominal aortic aneurysms

Mice placed on a low-calorie diet are less likely to develop abdominal aortic aneurysms, according to a new study in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Are migraines genetic? An interview with Nick Furlotte

Are migraines genetic? An interview with Nick Furlotte

There's a big debate right now in the migraine community around the underlying cause of the disease. The question is whether it is vascular, and has something to do with our vessels, or whether it has to do with our neurons not functioning correctly or misfiring. [More]
Researchers identify, validate three distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer

Researchers identify, validate three distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer

In the largest study of its kind to date, researchers have identified and validated three distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer that correlate with distant metastasis-free survival and can assist in future research to determine how patients will respond to treatment, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
KAUST researchers develop biocompatible nanostructures for use in gene delivery

KAUST researchers develop biocompatible nanostructures for use in gene delivery

A tiny therapeutic delivery system that can control the body’s ability to manufacture proteins has been developed by Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) researchers. [More]
DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in Korea have uncovered the mechanisms behind the enzyme that controls our appetite in response to low glucose availability in the brain. [More]
New global map shines light on genetic roots of diseases

New global map shines light on genetic roots of diseases

A global genetic interaction map is revolutionizing how genes are being studied. A new study, involving University of Minnesota researchers, is no longer looking at genes as loners, but instead as a social network of the body, interacting in groups. The new approach may ultimately change our understanding of the genetic roots of diseases. [More]
Scientist uses stem cells derived from dental pulp to return hearing to deaf people

Scientist uses stem cells derived from dental pulp to return hearing to deaf people

Deafness is a condition in which the hearing diminishes or disappears; currently there are few procedures to treat because it often is irreversible. Also, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), the disease globally affects 360 million people. [More]
Scientists manage to produce first molecular map of genes in the pancreas

Scientists manage to produce first molecular map of genes in the pancreas

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have managed to produce the first molecular map of the genes that are active in the various cells of the human pancreas. [More]
Researchers receive grant to help develop stem cell therapy for glaucoma

Researchers receive grant to help develop stem cell therapy for glaucoma

Researchers from the University's Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease have been awarded a pump-priming grant to help develop a stem cell therapy for glaucoma. [More]
DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

Results of a study published this week show that the effects of smoking on DNA are wide-reaching and some persist long after a person has stopped smoking. The information gained may help improve our understanding of smoking-related diseases. [More]
Precision medicine trial shows analysing person's DNA improves treatment options for cancer patients

Precision medicine trial shows analysing person's DNA improves treatment options for cancer patients

A clinical trial for types of advanced cancer is the first of its kind to show that precision medicine - or tailoring treatment for individual people - can slow down the time it takes for a tumour to grow back, according to research presented at the Molecular Analysis for Personalised Therapy (MAP) conference, today (Friday). [More]
Some people may have youthful DNA despite old age, study shows

Some people may have youthful DNA despite old age, study shows

The DNA of young people is regulated to express the right genes at the right time. With the passing of years, the regulation of the DNA gradually gets disrupted, which is an important cause of ageing. [More]
Ludwig researchers shed more light on key requirement for function of regulatory T cells

Ludwig researchers shed more light on key requirement for function of regulatory T cells

A Ludwig Cancer Research study published online September 5th in Nature Immunology illuminates a key requirement for the function of regulatory T cells—immune cells that play a critical role in many biological processes, from suppressing inflammation and deadly autoimmunity to helping tumors evade immune attack. [More]
Scientists find way to reverse malfunctioning protein clumps involved in ALS

Scientists find way to reverse malfunctioning protein clumps involved in ALS

In the quest to understand the driving forces behind neurodegenerative diseases, researchers in recent years have zeroed in on clumps of malfunctioning proteins thought to kill neurons in the brain and spinal cord by jamming their cellular machinery. [More]
Scientists identify potential new way to prevent chronic urinary tract infections

Scientists identify potential new way to prevent chronic urinary tract infections

Researchers have identified a potential way to prevent chronic urinary tract infections (UTIs). Their research points to a key protein that bacteria use to latch onto the bladder and cause UTIs, according to scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
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