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Research reveals stark variation in genetic tests for inherited eye disease in England

Research reveals stark variation in genetic tests for inherited eye disease in England

New research from The University of Manchester published in the Journal of Community Genetics reveals a stark variation in genetic testing services for inherited eye disease in England. [More]
Study shows stark variation in genetic testing services for inherited eye conditions in England

Study shows stark variation in genetic testing services for inherited eye conditions in England

New research from The University of Manchester published in the Journal of Community Genetics reveals a stark variation in genetic testing services for inherited eye disease in England. [More]
New research reveals how a deadly fungus grows and kills immune cells

New research reveals how a deadly fungus grows and kills immune cells

New research from the University of Toronto has scientists re-thinking how a lethal fungus grows and kills immune cells. The study hints at a new approach to therapy for Candida albicans, one of the most common causes of bloodstream infections. [More]
Broad Institute expands collaboration with Bayer to develop new cardiovascular therapies

Broad Institute expands collaboration with Bayer to develop new cardiovascular therapies

The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have expanded their collaboration with Bayer HealthCare to include cardiovascular genomics and drug discovery. The goal of this new part of the alliance is to leverage insights from human genetics to help create new cardiovascular therapies. [More]
New study finds that walnuts have potential to benefit overall health

New study finds that walnuts have potential to benefit overall health

Multiple new research abstracts suggest walnuts may have the potential to positively affect several important health factors. From their impact on colon cancer and certain aspects of cognitive aging, to their positive effect on both gut health and vascular health, the research findings presented at Experimental Biology 2015 detail our latest understanding of walnuts' inner workings. [More]
Researchers uncover relationship between two proteins linked to cerebral cavernous malformations

Researchers uncover relationship between two proteins linked to cerebral cavernous malformations

Researchers have uncovered new details about the relationship between two proteins associated with the formation of cerebral cavernous malformations, a little understood neurovascular disorder. [More]
Reoccurring oxygen deprivation during pregnancy affects offspring's liver function

Reoccurring oxygen deprivation during pregnancy affects offspring's liver function

Sleep apnea, a disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops during sleep, is a potentially serious condition because it deprives the body of oxygen. It becomes an even more serious condition in pregnant women—who can be more prone to it—because the oxygen deprivation may affect the baby. [More]
CNIO researchers describe presence of MDH2 gene mutations in hereditary neuroendocrine tumors

CNIO researchers describe presence of MDH2 gene mutations in hereditary neuroendocrine tumors

Researchers in the Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre -- led by Alberto Cascón and Mercedes Robledo -- have described the presence of mutations in the MDH2 gene, in a family with very rare neuroendocrine tumours associated with a high hereditary component: pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas that affect the suprarenal and parathyroid glands (groups of chromaffin cells in the central nervous system), respectively. [More]
Cantrixil proves highly effective at killing human ovarian stem cells in pre-clinical study

Cantrixil proves highly effective at killing human ovarian stem cells in pre-clinical study

US-Australian drug discovery company, Novogen Ltd, and its subsidiary, CanTx, Inc., and Yale University, on March 27 released pre-clinical data on experimental anti-cancer drug, Cantrixil. The data was presented as an oral presentation by Professor Gil Mor MD PhD of Yale Medical School to the 62nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society of Reproductive Investigation in San Francisco, CA. [More]
Big data helps discover gephyrin protein's connection in human history

Big data helps discover gephyrin protein's connection in human history

Big data: It's a term we read and hear about often, but is hard to grasp. Computer scientists at Washington University in St. Louis' School of Engineering & Applied Science tackled some big data about an important protein and discovered its connection in human history as well as clues about its role in complex neurological diseases. [More]
New faculty members join UNC Lineberger to help launch immunotherapy clinical trials

New faculty members join UNC Lineberger to help launch immunotherapy clinical trials

Two new faculty members have joined the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center to help launch groundbreaking immunotherapy clinical trials testing an experimental treatment in which patients' own immune cells are genetically engineered to fight their cancer. [More]

DURECT initiates DUR-928 multi-dose Phase 1 clinical trial for NAFLD, NASH and AKI

DURECT Corporation today announced that it has initiated a multi-dose Phase 1 clinical trial of an oral formulation of DUR-928, the lead molecule in DURECT's Epigenomic Regulator Program. [More]
Researchers identify bio-markers that could help detect early stage colorectal cancer

Researchers identify bio-markers that could help detect early stage colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer globally and the second most common cause of cancer deaths. The chance of a cure is high if the cancer is detected early enough, but early detection is not a given. Researchers from VIB and KU Leuven - together with various European oncology centers, including UZ Leuven - have identified bio-markers that can be incorporated in a new diagnostic test. [More]
MDC scientists find solution to increase efficiency of precise genetic modifications

MDC scientists find solution to increase efficiency of precise genetic modifications

CRISPR-Cas9 is a powerful new tool for editing the genome. For researchers around the world, the CRISPR-Cas9 technique is an exciting innovation because it is faster and cheaper than previous methods. Now, using a molecular trick, Dr. Van Trung Chu and Professor Klaus Rajewsky of the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine Berlin-Buch and Dr. Ralf Kühn, MDC and Berlin Institute of Health, have found a solution to considerably increase the efficiency of precise genetic modifications by up to eightfold. [More]
Rare genetic mutation explains why flu can kill in rare cases

Rare genetic mutation explains why flu can kill in rare cases

Nobody likes getting the flu, but for some people, fluids and rest aren't enough. A small number of children who catch the influenza virus fall so ill they end up in the hospital — perhaps needing ventilators to breathe — even while their family and friends recover easily. New research by Rockefeller University scientists, published March 26 in Science, helps explain why: a rare genetic mutation. [More]
Genes crucial for vision multiplied in early stages of vertebrate evolution

Genes crucial for vision multiplied in early stages of vertebrate evolution

A new study from SciLifeLab at Uppsala University published in PLOS ONE shows that genes crucial for vision were multiplied in the early stages of vertebrate evolution and acquired distinct functions leading to the sophisticated mechanisms of vertebrate eyes. [More]
Experimental nanoparticle therapy speeds healing of all sorts of wounds

Experimental nanoparticle therapy speeds healing of all sorts of wounds

An experimental therapy developed by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University cut in half the time it takes to heal wounds compared to no treatment at all. Details of the therapy, which was successfully tested in mice, were published online in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. [More]
Researchers harness gene editing technique in mosquito that infects people with deadly diseases

Researchers harness gene editing technique in mosquito that infects people with deadly diseases

Traditionally, to understand how a gene functions, a scientist would breed an organism that lacks that gene - "knocking it out" - then ask how the organism has changed. Are its senses affected? Its behavior? [More]
UAB scientist explores the bone development function of runx2 gene

UAB scientist explores the bone development function of runx2 gene

Amjad Javed, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has taken a major step forward in understanding the bone development function of a gene called runx2, which could lead to future ways to speed bone healing, aid bone bioengineering, stem osteoporosis and reduce arthritis. [More]
Research: Common bacteria poised to become antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Research: Common bacteria poised to become antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Antibiotic resistance is poised to spread globally among bacteria frequently implicated in respiratory and urinary infections in hospital settings, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
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