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Meta-analysis links signalling pathways to bipolar disorder

Meta-analysis links signalling pathways to bipolar disorder

A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies has identified six biological pathways that may be involved in the genetic predisposition to develop bipolar disorder. [More]
NeoGenomics' revenue up 16.1% in first quarter 2014

NeoGenomics' revenue up 16.1% in first quarter 2014

NeoGenomics, Inc., a leading provider of cancer-focused genetic testing services today reported its results for the first quarter of 2014. [More]
Courtagen collaborates with CCMC to identify alterations in genes associated with ASD

Courtagen collaborates with CCMC to identify alterations in genes associated with ASD

Courtagen Life Sciences, Inc., an innovative molecular information company, announced today a collaboration with Connecticut Children's Medical Center to utilize Courtagen's sophisticated Next Generation Sequencing assays to help identify and characterize alterations found in genes associated with ASD. [More]
Alexion Pharmaceuticals obtains orphan drug designation from EC for Soliris

Alexion Pharmaceuticals obtains orphan drug designation from EC for Soliris

Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the European Commission has granted an orphan drug designation (ODD) to Soliris (eculizumab), a first-in-class terminal complement inhibitor, for the prevention of graft rejection following solid organ transplantation. Graft rejection can cause severe injury to the transplanted organ and is a significant barrier to successful transplantation. [More]
Sleeping more than 8 hours favours development of cognitive impairment in people over 65

Sleeping more than 8 hours favours development of cognitive impairment in people over 65

Sleeping more than 8 hours and less than 6 and the lack of cognitive stimulation such as reading favours the development of cognitive impairment in people over 65. This is the main conclusion of a study carried out by researchers from the Department of Pharmacy at the University CEU Cardenal Herrera and pharmacists in the Valencian Region (Spain). [More]
91% of Americans know genetic information has important utility in managing health

91% of Americans know genetic information has important utility in managing health

23andMe, the leading personal genetics company, is celebrating National DNA Day by taking an in-depth look at what Americans know about their DNA and how genetics play a role in our everyday lives. The survey found that 91 percent of Americans know that their genetic information has important utility in managing their health. [More]

Exposure to microgravity can simulate aging for immune cells

Telling someone to "act your age" is another way of asking him or her to behave better. Age, however, does not always bring improvements. [More]
Scientists develop DNA nanodevices that survive body's immune defenses

Scientists develop DNA nanodevices that survive body's immune defenses

It's a familiar trope in science fiction: In enemy territory, activate your cloaking device. And real-world viruses use similar tactics to make themselves invisible to the immune system. [More]

Research shows epigenetic changes contributed to human survival over other extinct species

In parallel with modern man (Homo sapiens), there were other, extinct types of humans with whom we lived side by side, such as Neanderthals and the recently discovered Denisovans of Siberia. Yet only Homo sapiens survived. What was it in our genetic makeup that gave us the advantage? [More]
Study reveals how human genome is protected from inadvertent import of viral RNA into cell

Study reveals how human genome is protected from inadvertent import of viral RNA into cell

Scientists of the Max F. Perutz Laboratories of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, together with colleagues of the ETH Zurich, have now shown how double stranded RNA, such as viral genetic information, is prevented from entering the nucleus of a cell. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Johns Hopkins scientists find a way to prevent atherosclerosis

Working with mice and rabbits, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a way to block abnormal cholesterol production, transport and breakdown, successfully preventing the development of atherosclerosis, the main cause of heart attacks and strokes and the number-one cause of death among humans. The condition develops when fat builds inside blood vessels over time and renders them stiff, narrowed and hardened, greatly reducing their ability to feed oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle and the brain. [More]

Studies identify 2 genes highly associated with IBD

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), a group of chronic inflammatory disorders of the intestine that result in painful and debilitating complications, affects over 1.4 million people in the U.S., and while there are treatments to reduce inflammation for patients, there is no cure. [More]
New computational tool identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations

New computational tool identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations

A computational tool developed at the University of Utah (U of U) has successfully identified diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases, U of U researchers and their colleagues report in a new study in The American Journal of Human Genetics. [More]
University of Utah software successfully identifies diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases

University of Utah software successfully identifies diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases

A computational tool developed at the University of Utah (U of U) has successfully identified diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases, U of U researchers and their colleagues report in a new study in The American Journal of Human Genetics. The software, Phevor (Phenotype Driven Variant Ontological Re-ranking tool), identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations by analyzing the exomes, or areas of DNA where proteins that code for genes are made, in individual patients and small families. [More]
Interleukin receives conditional approval to offer results of PerioPredict genetic risk test

Interleukin receives conditional approval to offer results of PerioPredict genetic risk test

Interleukin Genetics, Inc. today announced it has received conditional approval from the New York State Department of Health to offer, process and report the results of the PerioPredictâ„¢ Genetic Risk Test for periodontal disease. [More]

NBTY introduces Nature's Origin, a complete line of nutritional supplements

NBTY, Inc., a leading global manufacturer and distributor of high-quality vitamins and nutritional supplements, introduces Nature's Origin, its first complete line of vitamins, minerals and herbal supplements that are free from ingredients made with GMOs, preservatives, gluten and irradiation. [More]
Researcher explores public perceptions related to newborn screening programs

Researcher explores public perceptions related to newborn screening programs

While 94 per cent of Canadians surveyed said they would participate in public health programs that screen newborns for a specific number of genetic conditions, only 80 per cent said they would be willing to participate in screening that would sequence their newborns' genomes. [More]

RMANJ releases new fertility checklist for early diagnosis and treatment options

With over seven million men and women in the United States impacted by infertility, information about early diagnosis and various infertility treatment options like in vitro fertilization (IVF), preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), and comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS) can offer help to many patients looking to overcome infertility. [More]
Manure from dairy cows contains newly identified antibiotic resistance genes

Manure from dairy cows contains newly identified antibiotic resistance genes

Manure from dairy cows, which is commonly used as a farm soil fertilizer, contains a surprising number of newly identified antibiotic resistance genes from the cows' gut bacteria. The findings, reported in mBio- the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, hints that cow manure is a potential source of new types of antibiotic resistance genes that transfer to bacteria in the soils where food is grown. [More]

Race to Yes campaign lauds Sarepta's plans to seek FDA approval for Duchenne treatment

The Race to Yes campaign today lauded drug maker Sarepta on its plans to move forward immediately to seek FDA approval of the first drug to successfully treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the world's leading genetic killer of children. [More]