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Study points to TMPRSS2 gene as culprit for aggressive forms of androgen-fuelled cancers

Study points to TMPRSS2 gene as culprit for aggressive forms of androgen-fuelled cancers

A new study led by University of Toronto researcher Dr. David Lam has discovered the trigger behind the most severe forms of cancer pain. Released in top journal Pain this month, the study points to TMPRSS2 as the culprit: a gene that is also responsible for some of the most aggressive forms of androgen-fuelled cancers. [More]
Penn researchers find molecular bond between DNA damage, cellular senescence and premature aging

Penn researchers find molecular bond between DNA damage, cellular senescence and premature aging

Like a beloved pair of jeans, human DNA accumulates damage over time, and older people's bodies can't repair it as well. Many scientists believe a build up of damage can cause cells to enter an irreversible dormant state known as senescence. Cellular senescence is believed to be responsible for some of the telltale signs of aging, such as weakened bones, less resilient skin and slow-downs in organ function. [More]
Scientists identify possible new genes that could change benign skin growths into fatal melanomas

Scientists identify possible new genes that could change benign skin growths into fatal melanomas

A Houston Methodist-led team of international scientists has identified hundreds of possible new genes in mice that could transform benign skin growths into deadly melanomas. [More]
Bacterial imbalance in the gut can lead to inflammation similar to Crohn's disease

Bacterial imbalance in the gut can lead to inflammation similar to Crohn's disease

Crohn's disease is one of a family of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). While it has already been proven to have genetic causes, scientists have now shown that the presence of certain intestinal bacteria also plays a role. [More]
New study finds high mortality risks from alcohol and drug abuse among ex-prisoners

New study finds high mortality risks from alcohol and drug abuse among ex-prisoners

Alcohol and drug misuse are responsible for around a third of all deaths in former male prisoners and half in female ex-prisoners, a new study of almost 48000 ex-prisoners published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal has found. Moreover, the research shows that a substantial proportion of these deaths are from preventable causes, including accidents and suicide (42% in men and 70% in women). [More]
Twins pilot study shows genes may make some people more attractive to mosquitoes

Twins pilot study shows genes may make some people more attractive to mosquitoes

The likelihood of being bitten by mosquitoes could be down to our genes, according to a study carried out on twins. Research from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine found, for the first time, an underlying genetic component to how attractive we are to mosquitoes and this is likely to be caused by genetic control of our body odour. [More]
Calorie restriction can improve muscle metabolism during middle age

Calorie restriction can improve muscle metabolism during middle age

Calorie restriction has long been studied as a way to extend lifespan in animals. It has been associated with the ability to reduce the risks of cardiovascular and other diseases and to improve overall health. [More]
Case Western Reserve and MIT receive $1.7 million to explore potential treatments for Down syndrome

Case Western Reserve and MIT receive $1.7 million to explore potential treatments for Down syndrome

Thanks to the generosity of a philanthropy dedicated to children's issues, renowned Down syndrome researcher Alberto Costa, MD, PhD, has taken yet another step toward making Northeast Ohio the nation's leader in exploring potential treatments of the genetic condition that affects 400,000 people in the U.S. [More]
New research shows that serious life events in childhood can increase type 1 diabetes risk

New research shows that serious life events in childhood can increase type 1 diabetes risk

New research from Sweden published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) shows that serious life events (SLEs) in childhood, such as death or illness in the family, divorce/separation, a new child or adult in the family, and conflicts in the family, can triple the risk of subsequently developing type 1 diabetes (T1D). [More]
EMD Millipore launches Magna ChIRP RNA Interactome Kits for analyzing chromatin-associated RNAs

EMD Millipore launches Magna ChIRP RNA Interactome Kits for analyzing chromatin-associated RNAs

EMD Millipore, the Life Science business of Merck KGaA of Darmstadt, Germany, today introduced Magna ChIRP™ RNA Interactome Kits, which allow researchers to more easily identify, recover and analyze regions of chromatin that interact with chromatin-associated RNAs such as long non-coding RNA (lncRNA). [More]
Scientists find genetic link between autism and prodigy

Scientists find genetic link between autism and prodigy

Researchers have uncovered the first evidence of a genetic link between prodigy and autism. The scientists found that child prodigies in their sample share some of the same genetic variations with people who have autism. [More]
ADCs based on alpha-amanatin may help treat colorectal cancer

ADCs based on alpha-amanatin may help treat colorectal cancer

For some time, cancer scientists have considered the toxin, alpha-amanatin derived from "death cap" mushrooms, as a possible cancer treatment. However, due to its penchant for causing liver toxicity, its potential as an effective therapy has been limited. [More]
ADHD children at risk for eating disorder

ADHD children at risk for eating disorder

Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, are significantly more likely to have an eating disorder — a loss of control eating syndrome (LOC-ES) — akin to binge eating, a condition more generally diagnosed only in adults, according to results of a new Johns Hopkins Children's Center study. [More]
Purdue University study sheds light on how decitabine drug reverses cell damage

Purdue University study sheds light on how decitabine drug reverses cell damage

A Purdue University study sheds light on how cell damage is reversed by the cancer drug decitabine and identifies a potential biomarker that could indicate a patient's stage of cancer and response to treatment. [More]
ATA guidelines provide recommendations for managing thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer in children

ATA guidelines provide recommendations for managing thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer in children

Previous guidelines from the American Thyroid Association for evaluating and managing thyroid nodules and thyroid cancers targeted adults. Recognizing the potential differences in clinical presentation and long-term outcomes, and the potential risks of overly aggressive therapy in pediatric patients with thyroid cancer, an ATA Task Force developed management guidelines for children with thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), which are published in Thyroid, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers and the official journal of the American Thyroid Association. [More]
Scientists identify missing genetic link in common variable immunodeficiency disorder

Scientists identify missing genetic link in common variable immunodeficiency disorder

In the largest genetic study to date of a challenging immunodeficiency disorder, scientists have identified a gene that may be a "missing link" between overactive and underactive immune activity. The gene candidate also plays a key role in autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and allergies. [More]
New patent-pending detection method identifies bacteria contaminating oysters

New patent-pending detection method identifies bacteria contaminating oysters

In a major breakthrough in shellfish management and disease prevention, researchers at the University of New Hampshire have discovered a new method to detect a bacterium that has contaminated New England oyster beds and sickened consumers who ate the contaminated shellfish. [More]
Sysmex Inostics to offer OncoBEAM CLIA laboratory services in Germany, Austria and Switzerland

Sysmex Inostics to offer OncoBEAM CLIA laboratory services in Germany, Austria and Switzerland

Sysmex Inostics, a subsidiary of Sysmex Corporation, today announced that they have signed an exclusive distributor agreement with IndivuTest GmbH, and its parent company Indivumed GmbH, a cancer research company focused on the development of individualized cancer diagnostics and therapies. [More]
Study: Childhood cancer survivors need better care throughout their lives

Study: Childhood cancer survivors need better care throughout their lives

Children with cancer have a good chance of surviving the disease--today more than 80 percent survive because of advances in treatment and care. However, recent studies have shown that some of these more than 420,000 U.S. childhood cancer survivors face future health-related challenges as they become adults such as a second cancer diagnosis, cardiac failure, or other severe medical complications. [More]

Researchers explore evolution of eardrums

Researchers at the RIKEN Evolutionary Morphology Laboratory and the University of Tokyo in Japan have determined that the eardrum evolved independently in mammals and diapsids--the taxonomic group that includes reptiles and birds. Published in Nature Communications, the work shows that the mammalian eardrum depends on lower jaw formation, while that of diapsids develops from the upper jaw. [More]
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