Genetic News and Research RSS Feed - Genetic News and Research

Obesity mutation MC4R can significantly contribute to weight gain at early age

Obesity mutation MC4R can significantly contribute to weight gain at early age

People who have the most common genetic mutation linked to obesity respond differently to pictures of appetizing foods than overweight or obese people who do not have the genetic mutation, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Discovery could lead to development of new cancer therapies

Discovery could lead to development of new cancer therapies

DNA mutations-long known to fuel cancer as well as evolutionary changes in a living organism-had been thought to be rare events that occur randomly throughout the genome. [More]
Alterations to single gene could predict risk of suicide attempt

Alterations to single gene could predict risk of suicide attempt

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered a chemical alteration in a single human gene linked to stress reactions that, if confirmed in larger studies, could give doctors a simple blood test to reliably predict a person's risk of attempting suicide. [More]
Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

The University of Maryland Schools of Dentistry (UM SOD) and Medicine (UM SOM) jointly announced today that they have received a five-year $10.7 million grant award from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health to study the causes, prevention and treatment of sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs). [More]
New toolkits help young adults navigate shift from pediatric to adult health care

New toolkits help young adults navigate shift from pediatric to adult health care

For young adults who have been diagnosed with a chronic condition like Type 1 diabetes or growth hormone deficiency, health concerns can add a degree of difficulty to transitions like leaving for college or living alone for the first time. [More]
New electrical pattern in brains predicts how well individual animals fare in stressful situations

New electrical pattern in brains predicts how well individual animals fare in stressful situations

Some people can handle stressful situations better than others, and it's not all in their genes: Even identical twins show differences in how they respond. [More]
Sequenom's total revenues increase 62% to $39.8 million in Q2 2014

Sequenom's total revenues increase 62% to $39.8 million in Q2 2014

Sequenom, Inc., a life sciences company providing innovative genetic analysis solutions, today reported total revenues of $39.8 million for the second quarter of 2014, an increase of 62% compared to revenues of $24.5 million for the second quarter of 2013. [More]
New stem-cell discovery may lead to more streamlined process for tissue regeneration

New stem-cell discovery may lead to more streamlined process for tissue regeneration

A new stem-cell discovery might one day lead to a more streamlined process for obtaining stem cells, which in turn could be used in the development of replacement tissue for failing body parts, according to UC San Francisco scientists who reported the findings in the current edition of Cell. [More]
Researchers confirm for the first time that achalasia is autoimmune in origin

Researchers confirm for the first time that achalasia is autoimmune in origin

Achalasia is a rare disease - it affects 1 in 100,000 people - characterized by a loss of nerve cells in the esophageal wall. [More]
Research points to new direction for potential therapies to treat mucoepidermoid carcinoma

Research points to new direction for potential therapies to treat mucoepidermoid carcinoma

Research conducted at the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute has discovered links between a set of genes known to promote tumor growth and mucoepidermoid carcinoma, an oral cancer that affects the salivary glands. The discovery could help physicians develop new treatments that target the cancer's underlying genetic causes. [More]
PLXNA4 gene may increase risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

PLXNA4 gene may increase risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine report variants in a new gene, PLXNA4, which may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). The discovery of this novel genetic association may lead to new drug treatment options that target PLXNA4 specifically. [More]
Researchers provide global genotype prevalence estimates for HCV

Researchers provide global genotype prevalence estimates for HCV

In one of the largest prevalence studies to date, researchers from the U.K. provide national, regional, and global genotype prevalence estimates for the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Findings published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, indicate that genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide, with over 83 million patients infected of which one-third reside in East Asia. [More]
GW researcher awarded SFARI grant for autism research

GW researcher awarded SFARI grant for autism research

The link between autism and disrupted brain development is an essential part of the puzzle of the disease, and is largely unknown. However, thanks to funding from the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative, George Washington University researcher Anthony-Samuel LaMantia, Ph.D. may be able to offer truly integrative and in-depth answers to these key questions in the field of autism research. [More]
Unique bacterial biomarkers may help develop diagnostics, treatments for liver cirrhosis

Unique bacterial biomarkers may help develop diagnostics, treatments for liver cirrhosis

ENTEROME Bioscience SA, a pioneer in the development of innovative disease management solutions based on a deep understanding of the gut microbiome, and with a strong focus on liver diseases, highlights the advanced online publication in Nature of a research paper describing the identification of a unique series of bacterial biomarkers that could provide new opportunities for the development of diagnostics and treatments for liver cirrhosis. [More]
Early life experiences influence risk of cognitive impairment in later life

Early life experiences influence risk of cognitive impairment in later life

Early life experiences, such as childhood socioeconomic status and literacy, may have greater influence on the risk of cognitive impairment late in life than such demographic characteristics as race and ethnicity, a large study by researchers with the UC Davis Alzheimer's Disease Center and the University of Victoria, Canada, has found. [More]
Genetics involved with menarche may hold keys to preventing diabetes or osteoporosis in later life

Genetics involved with menarche may hold keys to preventing diabetes or osteoporosis in later life

A novel study shows that the age girls reach puberty is influenced by 'imprinted genes'-a subset of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent contributes the gene. [More]
Molecular testing panel increases likelihood of performing correct surgery for thyroid cancer patients

Molecular testing panel increases likelihood of performing correct surgery for thyroid cancer patients

The routine use of a molecular testing panel developed at UPMC greatly increases the likelihood of performing the correct initial surgery for patients with thyroid nodules and cancer, report researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), partner with UPMC CancerCenter. [More]
Epigenetic switch can cause cancer, shows study

Epigenetic switch can cause cancer, shows study

Cancer has long been thought to be primarily a genetic disease, but in recent decades scientists have come to believe that epigenetic changes - which don't change the DNA sequence but how it is 'read' - also play a role in cancer. [More]
Experts at ABTA conference reveal possible causes, risk factors for brain tumors

Experts at ABTA conference reveal possible causes, risk factors for brain tumors

Today, nearly 700,000 people in the U.S. are living with a brain tumor, and yet, when it comes to pinpointing causes or risk factors, scientists are still searching for answers. [More]
UTHealth scientists identify inhibitory switch to prevent peripheral vascular disease

UTHealth scientists identify inhibitory switch to prevent peripheral vascular disease

Millions of people in the United States have a circulatory problem of the legs called peripheral vascular disease. It can be painful and may even require surgery in serious cases. This disease can lead to severe skeletal muscle wasting and, in turn, limb amputation. [More]