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Headache disorders may increase risk of thyroid condition

Headache disorders may increase risk of thyroid condition

Sufferers of migraines, cluster headaches, tension headaches or other headache disorders are at greater risk of developing a thyroid condition called hypothyroidism, according to a study by University of Cincinnati College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Association for Molecular Pathology announces winners of 2016 awards

Association for Molecular Pathology announces winners of 2016 awards

The Association for Molecular Pathology, the premier global, non-profit organization serving molecular diagnostics professionals, today announced the recipients of the Jeffrey A. Kant Leadership Award and the AMP Meritorious Service Award. Together with the AMP Award for Excellence in Molecular Diagnostics, these awards will be presented at the AMP 2016 Annual Meeting. [More]
Neuroscientists discover genetic 'lingua franca' that allows the brain to interpret sensory input

Neuroscientists discover genetic 'lingua franca' that allows the brain to interpret sensory input

Sight, touch and hearing are our windows to the world: these sensory channels send a constant flow of information to the brain, which acts to sort out and integrate these signals, allowing us to perceive the world and interact with our environment. [More]
Aspergillus fungus can easily adapt to changing environments, researchers find

Aspergillus fungus can easily adapt to changing environments, researchers find

The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is capable of rapid genetic adaptation in both natural environments and in humans according to a study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases by Radboud university medical center/CWZ and Wageningen University & Research. [More]
Scientists identify rare genetic variants linked to risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes

Scientists identify rare genetic variants linked to risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes

Scientists from the Welcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have discovered 17 rare human genetic variations associated with risk factors for diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. [More]
Increasing specific brain fats could be potential strategy for preventing epileptic seizures

Increasing specific brain fats could be potential strategy for preventing epileptic seizures

Increasing the concentration of specific fats in the brain could suppress epileptic seizures. This is evident from ground-breaking research carried out by the research groups of Professor Patrik Verstreken and Professor Wim Versées. [More]
Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies open new avenues for development of effective vaccine

Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies open new avenues for development of effective vaccine

A small number of people infected with HIV produce antibodies with an amazing effect: Not only are the antibodies directed against the own virus strain, but also against different sub-types of HIV that circulate worldwide. [More]
Research shows degenerative diseases affecting the retina may be treatable with gene therapy

Research shows degenerative diseases affecting the retina may be treatable with gene therapy

Researchers have demonstrated the ability to deliver a fully functional copy of the CLN3 gene to stem cells of patients with juvenile NCL, an inherited neurodegenerative disease in which a mutation in the CLN3 gene causes early-onset severe central vision loss. [More]
MU researcher awarded $3 million NIH grant to develop new drugs for treating HBV

MU researcher awarded $3 million NIH grant to develop new drugs for treating HBV

Hepatitis B (HBV) is a viral infection that increases the likelihood of developing liver cancer or liver failure. [More]
New NCCN Guidelines outline diagnosis, treatment strategies for myeloproliferative neoplasms

New NCCN Guidelines outline diagnosis, treatment strategies for myeloproliferative neoplasms

Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN) are a group of blood cancers characterized by significant symptoms and a high risk of transformation into acute leukemia. [More]
Are migraines genetic? An interview with Nick Furlotte

Are migraines genetic? An interview with Nick Furlotte

There's a big debate right now in the migraine community around the underlying cause of the disease. The question is whether it is vascular, and has something to do with our vessels, or whether it has to do with our neurons not functioning correctly or misfiring. [More]
Researchers identify, validate three distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer

Researchers identify, validate three distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer

In the largest study of its kind to date, researchers have identified and validated three distinct molecular subtypes of prostate cancer that correlate with distant metastasis-free survival and can assist in future research to determine how patients will respond to treatment, according to research presented today at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Salk scientist Clodagh O'Shea named recipient of grant from Faculty Scholars Program

Salk scientist Clodagh O'Shea named recipient of grant from Faculty Scholars Program

Clodagh O'Shea, an associate professor in the Salk Institute's Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory, is among the first recipients of a grant from the Faculty Scholars Program, a new partnership of Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Simons Foundation for early career researchers whose work shows the potential for groundbreaking contributions in their fields. [More]
Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted three simultaneous approvals for the expanded use of Ilaris (canakinumab) to treat three rare and distinct types of Periodic Fever Syndromes. [More]
KAUST researchers develop biocompatible nanostructures for use in gene delivery

KAUST researchers develop biocompatible nanostructures for use in gene delivery

A tiny therapeutic delivery system that can control the body’s ability to manufacture proteins has been developed by Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) researchers. [More]
DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

DGIST researchers uncover mechanisms that control appetite during low glucose conditions in the brain

Researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in Korea have uncovered the mechanisms behind the enzyme that controls our appetite in response to low glucose availability in the brain. [More]
NIGHTSEA and EMS nominate Dr. Sarah Petersen for 2016 KEY Award

NIGHTSEA and EMS nominate Dr. Sarah Petersen for 2016 KEY Award

NIGHTSEA, creators and manufacturers of the innovative Stereo Microscope Fluorescence Adapter (SFA), and Electron Microscopy Sciences (EMS) are pleased to award the second annual KEY Award for New Faculty to Dr. Sarah Petersen of Kenyon College. [More]
New global map shines light on genetic roots of diseases

New global map shines light on genetic roots of diseases

A global genetic interaction map is revolutionizing how genes are being studied. A new study, involving University of Minnesota researchers, is no longer looking at genes as loners, but instead as a social network of the body, interacting in groups. The new approach may ultimately change our understanding of the genetic roots of diseases. [More]
Identical twins experience unimaginable cancer

Identical twins experience unimaginable cancer

Since the day they came home from the hospital in matching newborn monkey outfits, Zane and Zac Taylor have done everything together. [More]
Gene editing of hematopoietic stem cells can cure many hereditary and congenital diseases

Gene editing of hematopoietic stem cells can cure many hereditary and congenital diseases

Recent advances in gene editing technology, which allows for targeted repair of disease-causing mutations, can be applied to hematopoietic stem cells with the potential to cure a variety of hereditary and congenital diseases. [More]
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