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BioLight Life Sciences Investments reports operational and financial results for Q2 2015

BioLight Life Sciences Investments reports operational and financial results for Q2 2015

BioLight Life Sciences Investments, a firm that invests in, manages and commercializes biomedical innovations in ophthalmology and cancer diagnostics, today reported operational and financial results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2015. [More]
Researchers find genetic cause of previously unknown disease

Researchers find genetic cause of previously unknown disease

Researchers at the University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital have found the genetic cause of a previously undescribed disease. With this, they have solved an over ten year old medical conundrum. [More]
Autism Speaks launches web-based portal for MSSNG database

Autism Speaks launches web-based portal for MSSNG database

Autism Speaks, the world's leading autism science and advocacy organization, today launched the web-based portal for its MSSNG database, making the resource available to researchers worldwide. [More]
Gene therapy restores visual function in mouse model of LCA1

Gene therapy restores visual function in mouse model of LCA1

Mice lacking the protein retGC1, which is deficient in humans suffering Leber congenital amaurosis-1 (LCA1), a disorder that causes severe visual impairment beginning in infancy, received gene therapy to replace retGC1 and showed fully restored visual function that persisted for at least 6 months. [More]
Study sheds light on ways to improve embryonic wound healing in humans

Study sheds light on ways to improve embryonic wound healing in humans

It's like something out of a science-fiction movie - time-lapse photography showing how wounds in embryos of fruit flies heal themselves. The images are not only real; they shed light on ways to improve wound recovery in humans. [More]
Northwestern University receives $11.7 million NCI grant to use nanotechnology for cancer treatments

Northwestern University receives $11.7 million NCI grant to use nanotechnology for cancer treatments

Northwestern University, a leader in cancer nanotechnology research, has received a five-year, $11.7 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to use nanotechnology to develop next-generation cancer treatments. [More]
Researchers discover that vitamin D may play significant role in preventing AMD among women

Researchers discover that vitamin D may play significant role in preventing AMD among women

Vitamin D has been studied extensively in relation to bone health as well as cancer. Now, a team led by a researcher at the University at Buffalo has discovered that vitamin D may play a significant role in eye health, specifically in the possible prevention of age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, among women who are more genetically prone to developing the sight-damaging disease. [More]
Multiple HIV-1 variants at the beginning of infection impact viral load setpoints

Multiple HIV-1 variants at the beginning of infection impact viral load setpoints

HIV-1 infection with multiple founder variants points to poorer clinical outcomes than infection with a single variant, according to a paper published today in the journal Nature Medicine. [More]
CUMC vision researchers discover gene that causes myopia

CUMC vision researchers discover gene that causes myopia

Vision researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have discovered a gene that causes myopia, but only in people who spend a lot of time in childhood reading or doing other "nearwork." [More]
Gene linked to sudden cardiac death in general population identified using ICD monitoring

Gene linked to sudden cardiac death in general population identified using ICD monitoring

A gene associated with sudden cardiac death in the general population has been identified using implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) monitoring in research presented for the first time at ESC Congress today. [More]
Gene ZSCAN4 may help treat Down syndrome

Gene ZSCAN4 may help treat Down syndrome

For people with Down syndrome, news from Elixirgen, LLC may brighten their day. The biotechnology company, located in the Science + Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, has outlined one of the best potential therapies yet for people with Down syndrome and other chromosome disorders in a paper entitled, "Correction of Down syndrome and Edwards syndrome aneuploidies in human cell cultures," published in the journal DNA Research. [More]
Scientists identify new protein that regulates severity of tissue damage caused by RA

Scientists identify new protein that regulates severity of tissue damage caused by RA

Scientists have identified a new protein (C5orf30) which regulates the severity of tissue damage caused by rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an autoimmune disease that causes inflammation, pain, stiffness and damage to the joints of the feet, hips, knees, and hands. [More]
New book provides authoritative overview of neuroendocrine tumors

New book provides authoritative overview of neuroendocrine tumors

Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) originate from diffuse neuroendocrine cells that are dispersed throughout the body, predominantly in the gastrointestinal tract, islets of Langerhans in the pancreas and the bronchopulmonary system. [More]
Drinking coffee increases risk of cardiovascular events in young adults with mild hypertension

Drinking coffee increases risk of cardiovascular events in young adults with mild hypertension

Coffee drinking is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events (mainly heart attacks) in young adults (18-45) with mild hypertension, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Lucio Mos, a cardiologist at Hospital of San Daniele del Friuli in Udine, Italy. [More]
ESC Guidelines recommend DNA analysis for post mortem assessment in young sudden death victims

ESC Guidelines recommend DNA analysis for post mortem assessment in young sudden death victims

ESC Guidelines published today recommend DNA analysis as a fundamental component of post mortem assessment in young sudden death victims. Identification of a genetic cause helps to quickly diagnose and protect relatives. [More]
New treatment algorithm for pulmonary arterial hypertension launched in 2015 ESC/ERS Guidelines

New treatment algorithm for pulmonary arterial hypertension launched in 2015 ESC/ERS Guidelines

A novel treatment algorithm for pulmonary arterial hypertension is launched today in new pulmonary hypertension guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology and European Respiratory Society. [More]
Oysters play important role in persistence and transmission of norovirus

Oysters play important role in persistence and transmission of norovirus

Oysters not only transmit human norovirus; they also serve as a major reservoir for these pathogens, according to research published August 28 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. "More than 80 percent of human norovirus genotypes were detected in oyster samples or oyster-related outbreaks," said corresponding author Yongjie Wang, PhD. [More]
KAIST scientists predict how biological circuits sustain rhythms

KAIST scientists predict how biological circuits sustain rhythms

Our bodies have a variety of biological clocks that follow rhythms or oscillations with periods ranging from seconds to days. For example, our hearts beat every second, and cells divide periodically. The circadian clock located in the hypothalamus generates twenty-four hour rhythms, timing our sleep and hormone release. [More]
New non-invasive image processing technique may improve IVF success rates

New non-invasive image processing technique may improve IVF success rates

A collaboration between biologists and engineers at Monash University has led to the development of a new non-invasive image processing technique to visualise embryo formation. Researchers were able to see, for the first time, the movement of all of the cells in living mammalian embryos as they develop under the microscope. [More]
Researchers provide new insights into biology of aging, age-related diseases

Researchers provide new insights into biology of aging, age-related diseases

The scientific team of a new biotech company Gero in collaboration with one of the leading academics in the field of aging Prof. Robert J. Shmookler Reis (current world record holder in life extension for model animals - 10 fold for nematodes) has recently brought new insights into biology of aging and age-related diseases, primarily, around the stability and stress resistance of certain gene regulatory networks. [More]
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