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Scientists reveal how disruption of DISC1 gene involved in mental illness affects the brain

Scientists reveal how disruption of DISC1 gene involved in mental illness affects the brain

Scientists have for the first time shown how the disruption of a key gene involved in mental illness impacts on the brain. [More]
TGen professor to receive top award from Arizona Medical Association

TGen professor to receive top award from Arizona Medical Association

Dr. Daniel D. Von Hoff, Distinguished Professor and Physician-In-Chief of the Translational Genomics Research Institute, will receive one of the top awards May 29 from the Arizona Medical Association. [More]
Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Scientists at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida created a novel mouse that exhibits the symptoms and neurodegeneration associated with the most common genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease), both of which are caused by a mutation in the a gene called C9ORF72. [More]
Scientists uncover role of HTRA3 protease in Cockayne syndrome

Scientists uncover role of HTRA3 protease in Cockayne syndrome

Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and CNRS, in collaboration with scientists from the Institut Gustave Roussy and CEA, have succeeded in restoring normal activity in cells isolated from patients with the premature aging disease Cockayne syndrome. They have uncovered the role played in these cells by an enzyme, the HTRA3 protease. [More]
Clinical genomic sequencing could impact treatment decisions in advanced prostate cancer patients

Clinical genomic sequencing could impact treatment decisions in advanced prostate cancer patients

An international collaboration of researchers are advancing precision medicine to men with advanced prostate cancer. [More]
Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Bacteria resistant to antibiotics are on the rise. There are different explanations for how resistances are transferred. Researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna found phages in chicken meat that are able to transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria. Phages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They can contribute to the spread of antimicrobial resistance. [More]
Sex-determining gene in mosquitoes may help reduce disease transmission

Sex-determining gene in mosquitoes may help reduce disease transmission

Researchers with the Fralin Life Science Institute at Virginia Tech have identified a gene responsible for sex determination in mosquitoes that can transmit yellow fever, dengue, and chikungunya viruses. [More]
TGen and Baylor partnership set to increase treatment options for cancer patients

TGen and Baylor partnership set to increase treatment options for cancer patients

The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Baylor Research Institute (BRI) at Dallas today announce an agreement that will focus on accelerating early detection and treatments for patients with a broad range of cancers. [More]
Scientists find new way to convert blood cells into sensory neurons

Scientists find new way to convert blood cells into sensory neurons

Scientists at McMaster University have discovered how to make adult sensory neurons from human patients simply by having them roll up their sleeve and providing a blood sample. [More]
Splicing pattern of obesity, type 2 diabetes genes may contribute to pathophysiology of obesity

Splicing pattern of obesity, type 2 diabetes genes may contribute to pathophysiology of obesity

Alternative splicing of obesity and type 2 diabetes related genes may contribute to the pathophysiology of obesity, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. Obesity leads to changes in the splicing pattern of metabolically relevant genes such as TCF7L2 and INSR, resulting in impaired insulin action. [More]
Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

A technique called auditory brainstem implantation can restore hearing for patients who can't benefit from cochlear implants. A team of US and Japanese experts has mapped out the surgical anatomy and approaches for auditory brainstem implantation in the June issue of Operative Neurosurgery, published on behalf of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Research finds association between fine particulate air pollution and childhood autism risk

Exposure to fine particulate air pollution during pregnancy through the first two years of a child's life may be associated with an increased risk of the child developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a condition that affects one in 68 children, according to a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health investigation of children in southwestern Pennsylvania. [More]
New study shows that infections can affect cognitive ability

New study shows that infections can affect cognitive ability

New research shows that infections can impair your cognitive ability measured on an IQ scale. The study is the largest of its kind to date, and it shows a clear correlation between infection levels and impaired cognition. [More]
Depression may be a risk factor for Parkinson's disease, say Umeå University researchers

Depression may be a risk factor for Parkinson's disease, say Umeå University researchers

People with depression may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, according to a large study by researchers at UmeƄ University, Sweden, published on 20 May, 2015, in the online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
DF/BWCC introduces new website to provide information about precision cancer medicine

DF/BWCC introduces new website to provide information about precision cancer medicine

Precision cancer medicine - diagnosis and treatment based on the genetic abnormalities of a specific tumor - is playing an ever-larger role in cancer care. The field got a boost earlier this year when President Barack Obama proposed a $215 million federal Precision Medicine Initiative with cancer as one of its priorities. [More]
First-of-its-kind DNA bank aims at advancing research into genetics of stuttering

First-of-its-kind DNA bank aims at advancing research into genetics of stuttering

Scientists at the University of Alberta's Institute for Stuttering Treatment and Research want Albertans to give a spit -- five millilitres to be precise -- to help find the cause and a cure for stuttering. [More]
Scientists reveal how lymphatic system develops in embryo

Scientists reveal how lymphatic system develops in embryo

For over one hundred years, scientists have debated the question of the origins of the lymphatic system - a parallel system to the blood vessels that serves as a conduit for everything from immune cells to fat molecules to cancer cells. This issue has now been resolved by Dr. Karina Yaniv of Weizmann Institute's Biological Regulation Department. In a study reported online today in Nature, she and her team revealed how the lymphatic system develops in the embryo and for the first time managed to grow lymphatic cells in the lab. [More]
Available research does not support link between chronic traumatic encephalopathy and sports

Available research does not support link between chronic traumatic encephalopathy and sports

Available research does not support the contention that athletes are uniquely at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) or other neurodegenerative disorders, according to a review in the June issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
AMD severity and progression tracks across eyes

AMD severity and progression tracks across eyes

Age-related macular degeneration in one eye tracks the severity of it in the fellow eye at all stages of the disease, findings from the Beaver Dam Eye study show. [More]
Celgene to use Cypher's Coral technology to find novel genomic biomarkers

Celgene to use Cypher's Coral technology to find novel genomic biomarkers

Cypher Genomics, Inc., a leading genome informatics company, today announced a collaboration with Celgene Corporation to apply Cypher's Coral technology to discover novel genomic biomarkers that associate with patient response to innovative medicines. [More]
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