Genetic News and Research RSS Feed - Genetic News and Research

Scientists and families to gather in The Woodlands, Texas to build up community around Christianson Syndrome

Scientists and families to gather in The Woodlands, Texas to build up community around Christianson Syndrome

It takes a committed community to develop effective treatments for a new disease. With that hope, scientists and families will come together in a Houston suburb July 30- Aug. 2 to build up the community around Christianson Syndrome, a genetic intellectual disability disorder, often associated with autistic features, first discovered 16 years ago. [More]
Discovery could pave way to new treatments for malaria

Discovery could pave way to new treatments for malaria

Scientists have discovered new ways in which the malaria parasite survives in the blood stream of its victims, a discovery that could pave the way to new treatments for the disease. [More]
UPCI scientists lead a panel of experts in revising guidelines for thyroid cancer tests

UPCI scientists lead a panel of experts in revising guidelines for thyroid cancer tests

University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute scientists recently led a panel of experts in revising national guidelines for thyroid cancer testing to reflect newly available tests that better incorporate personalized medicine into diagnosing the condition. [More]
Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Lupus, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes are among more than a score of diseases in which the immune system attacks the body it was designed to defend. But just why the immune system begins its misdirected assault has remained a mystery. [More]
WPI-led study provides clues to new ways to treat difficult-to-cure fungal infections

WPI-led study provides clues to new ways to treat difficult-to-cure fungal infections

A study by a multidisciplinary research team, co-directed by Worcester Polytechnic Institute, offers new insights into how virulent fungi adapt through genetic modifications to fight back against the effects of medication designed to block their spread, and how that battle leaves them temporarily weakened. These insights may provide clues to new ways to treat notoriously difficult-to-cure fungal infections like thrush and vaginitis. [More]
Penn biologists reveal recent migratory history of blacklegged ticks in Northeastern United States

Penn biologists reveal recent migratory history of blacklegged ticks in Northeastern United States

Lyme disease cases are on the rise, with diagnoses occurring in areas that were historically Lyme-free. Scientists attribute the spread to the fact that populations of blacklegged ticks, which carry the bacteria that causes the disease, now flourish in areas once thought to be devoid of ticks. [More]
Extra set of guanines in DNA may function like 'spare' to help prevent cancers from developing

Extra set of guanines in DNA may function like 'spare' to help prevent cancers from developing

Carrying around a spare tire is a good thing -- you never know when you'll get a flat. Turns out we're all carrying around "spare tires" in our genomes, too. Today, in ACS Central Science, researchers report that an extra set of guanines (or "G"s) in our DNA may function just like a "spare" to help prevent many cancers from developing. [More]
Blood-borne molecule promotes age-related cognitive decline

Blood-borne molecule promotes age-related cognitive decline

A blood-borne molecule that increases in abundance as we age blocks regeneration of brain cells and promotes cognitive decline, suggests a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco and Stanford School of Medicine. [More]
Akcea Therapeutics obtains FDA Orphan Drug Designation for volanesorsen

Akcea Therapeutics obtains FDA Orphan Drug Designation for volanesorsen

Akcea Therapeutics, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted Orphan Drug Designation to volanesorsen (ISIS-APOCIIIRx) for the treatment of patients with Familial Chylomicronemia Syndrome (FCS). [More]

Bidding for Health charity auction to raise funds in support of Immunodeficiency Canada

Bidding for Health charity auction will raise much needed funds in support of a Canadian national registered charity Immunodeficiency Canada. 100% of proceeds raised will be used towards its programs and services. There is a wide range of exciting items to bid on with new items added throughout the month, so check back often. Something for all ages. [More]
Harvard Medical School scientists reveal structure of vesicular stomatitis virus protein

Harvard Medical School scientists reveal structure of vesicular stomatitis virus protein

Viruses need us. In order to multiply, viruses have to invade a host cell and copy their genetic information. To do so, viruses encode their own replication machinery or components that subvert the host replication machinery to their advantage. [More]
Researchers compare effectiveness of two stem cell types in treating retinal degeneration

Researchers compare effectiveness of two stem cell types in treating retinal degeneration

By growing two types of stem cells in a "3-D culture" and measuring their ability to produce retinal cells, a team lead by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital researchers has found one cell type to be better at producing retinal cells. [More]
Imaging proteasome complex helps show target site for potential cancer drugs

Imaging proteasome complex helps show target site for potential cancer drugs

Scientists have pioneered the use of a high-powered imaging technique to picture in exquisite detail one of the central proteins of life - a cellular recycling unit with a role in many diseases. [More]
Gene therapy for cystic fibrosis shows significant benefit in lung function

Gene therapy for cystic fibrosis shows significant benefit in lung function

For the first time gene therapy for cystic fibrosis has shown a significant benefit in lung function compared with placebo, in a phase 2 randomised trial published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal. The technique replaces the defective gene response for cystic fibrosis by using inhaled molecules of DNA to deliver a normal working copy of the gene to lung cells. [More]
Study: Genes may not trigger heart disease in people suffering from migraine with aura

Study: Genes may not trigger heart disease in people suffering from migraine with aura

A new study suggests that genes may not be to blame for the increased risk of heart disease some studies have shown in people with migraine, especially those with migraine with aura. The research is published during Headache/Migraine Awareness Month in the inaugural issue of the journal Neurology Genetics, an open access, or free to the public, online-only, peer-reviewed journal from the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
SkylineDx’s MMprofiler test helps predict prognosis of patients with multiple myeloma

SkylineDx’s MMprofiler test helps predict prognosis of patients with multiple myeloma

SkylineDx, an innovative biotechnology company specialising in the development and commercialization of genetic tests, is today launching its MMprofiler assay. This test enables clinicians to more accurately predict the prognosis of patients with multiple myeloma (bone marrow cancer) than traditional methods. [More]
Penn study suggests future precision medicine approach to treating diabetes, other metabolic disorders

Penn study suggests future precision medicine approach to treating diabetes, other metabolic disorders

In the first study of its kind, Penn researchers have shown how an anti-diabetic drug can have variable effects depending on small natural differences in DNA sequence between individuals. Mitchell Lazar, MD, PhD, Raymond Soccio, MD, PhD, and colleagues at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, aim to apply this knowledge to develop personalized approaches to treating diabetes and other metabolic disorders. [More]
Scientists to discuss the possibility of predicting evolution at scientific conference in Portugal

Scientists to discuss the possibility of predicting evolution at scientific conference in Portugal

Is it possible to predict the evolution of the influenza virus? Or how rapidly bacteria evolve resistance to antibiotics? Or even how cancer cells spread inside a human being? These are some of the main topics of discussion that bring together renowned scientists from all over the world at the scientific conference "Forecasting evolution?" held at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation (FCG; Portugal) from 8th to 11th July. [More]
DTC genetic testing has negative consequences in children

DTC genetic testing has negative consequences in children

A woman coping with the burden of familial breast cancer can't help but wonder if her young daughter will suffer the same fate. Has she inherited the same disease-causing mutation? Is it best to be prepared for the future, or to wait? During the last decade, genetic tests have been through a sea change, both in their availability and the technologies behind them. Today there are at least 34 companies that offer direct to consumer (DTC) DNA testing, some of which return health results. And now it is possible to sequence someone's entire genetic code for the price of a laptop. [More]
Afamelanotide treatment improves quality of life in people with erythropoietic protoporphyria

Afamelanotide treatment improves quality of life in people with erythropoietic protoporphyria

A novel synthetic hormone that makes certain skin cells produce more melanin significantly increases pain-free sun exposure in people with erythropoietic protoporphyria, a rare, genetic disorder resulting in excruciating pain within minutes of sun exposure. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement