Genetic News and Research RSS Feed - Genetic News and Research

Scientists discover new way to predict risk for delayed recovery in children with AML

Scientists discover new way to predict risk for delayed recovery in children with AML

The chemotherapy treatments necessary to treat Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) in children can be grueling on the body, and can cause health-related complications during therapy, as well as long down the road after remission. [More]
Women with BRCA1 gene mutation at increased risk of aggressive uterine cancer

Women with BRCA1 gene mutation at increased risk of aggressive uterine cancer

Women who carry the BRCA1 gene mutation that dramatically increases their risk of breast and ovarian cancers are also at higher risk for a lethal form of uterine cancer, according to a study led by a Duke Cancer Institute researcher. [More]
Recommendations for integrating genomic results into clinical practice

Recommendations for integrating genomic results into clinical practice

A quiet transformation has been brewing in medicine, as large-scale DNA results become increasingly available to patients and healthcare providers. [More]
Sheffield researchers identify novel function of C9orf72 protein linked to ALS and FTD

Sheffield researchers identify novel function of C9orf72 protein linked to ALS and FTD

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered a novel function of the C9orf72 protein which is linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) - giving a new insight into the most common genetic cause of the degenerative diseases. [More]
Researchers uncover how dysfunction of brain circuit may contribute to memory loss

Researchers uncover how dysfunction of brain circuit may contribute to memory loss

Two interconnected brain areas - the hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex - help us to know where we are and to remember it later. [More]
Using NMR to investigate intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Dr Isabella Felli

Using NMR to investigate intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Dr Isabella Felli

“IDPs” is now a widely used acronym that stands for “intrinsically disordered proteins.” It is the term generally used by the scientific community to refer to a wide variety of proteins that do not have a stable 3D structure and are instead characterized by a high extent of local mobility, disorder and many conformers that are accessible at room temperature. [More]
Scientists gain new insights into how cancer cells may squeeze through narrow blood vessels

Scientists gain new insights into how cancer cells may squeeze through narrow blood vessels

The spread of cancer from a tumor's original location to other parts of the body can play a major role in whether the disease turns deadly. Many steps in this process, called metastasis, remain murky. [More]
New research identifies flaws in LM-method for Lyme disease

New research identifies flaws in LM-method for Lyme disease

A new microscopy technique (LM-method) developed to detect Lyme disease is unable to distinguish infected patients from healthy controls, yielding false-positive results that could lead doctors to over-diagnose a patient, according to new research published in the journal Infectious Diseases. [More]
Study focuses on critical proteins involved in ovarian cancer biology

Study focuses on critical proteins involved in ovarian cancer biology

In what is believed to be the largest study of its kind, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University and their collaborators from institutions across the nation have examined the collections of proteins in the tumors of 169 ovarian cancer patients to identify critical proteins present in their tumors. [More]
Scientists develop new nonradioactive method to determine telomere length

Scientists develop new nonradioactive method to determine telomere length

UT Southwestern Medical Center cell biologists have identified a new method for determining the length of telomeres, the endcaps of chromosomes, which can influence cancer progression and aging. [More]
New AAV 3.0 program to create next-generation viral vectors for better treatment of inherited diseases

New AAV 3.0 program to create next-generation viral vectors for better treatment of inherited diseases

The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has launched a new program, called AAV 3.0, to create new viral vectors to find quicker and better treatments for an array of diseases. James M. Wilson, MD, PhD, a professor of Medicine and director of the Orphan Disease Center, will lead an interdisciplinary team of over 30 scientists to create this new technology platform with support provided by the University of Pennsylvania Health System. [More]
Acupuncture improves headache-related QoL in TBI patients

Acupuncture improves headache-related QoL in TBI patients

A study comparing the effectiveness of usual care alone to usual care plus either auricular or traditional Chinese acupuncture in treating patients with headaches due to a previous traumatic brain injury (TBI) showed a significant improvement in headache-related quality of life (QoL) with the addition of acupuncture. [More]
New $2 test can rapidly detect Zika virus in saliva

New $2 test can rapidly detect Zika virus in saliva

Anxiety over the Zika virus is growing as the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro approach. To better diagnose and track the disease, scientists are now reporting in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry a new $2 test that in the lab can accurately detect low levels of the virus in saliva. [More]
Study links alpha-defensin genes to IgA nephropathy risk

Study links alpha-defensin genes to IgA nephropathy risk

A gene which forms part of our body's first line of defence against infection may be associated with an increased risk with a type of kidney disease, research involving academics at The University of Nottingham has discovered. [More]
Ways to prevent, treat skin irritations after contact with poisonous plants

Ways to prevent, treat skin irritations after contact with poisonous plants

Poisonous plants cause the most common allergic reactions to the skin, affecting as many as 50 million Americans each year, according to the American Skin Association. University of Alabama at Birmingham associate professor of Emergency Medicine, Walter Schrading, M.D., says it is important people are able to identify poisonous plants, prevent an allergic reaction and treat skin irritations after contact. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new strategy to design potential HIV vaccine candidates

TSRI scientists develop new strategy to design potential HIV vaccine candidates

Want to catch a criminal? Show a mugshot on the news. Want to stop HIV infections? Get the immune system to recognize and attack the virus's tell-tale structure. That's part of the basic approach behind efforts at The Scripps Research Institute to design an AIDS vaccine. [More]
Experts receive NIH grant to study why some HIV-infected individuals resist TB

Experts receive NIH grant to study why some HIV-infected individuals resist TB

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine experts and colleagues in the United States and Africa have received an $11 million, five-year NIH grant to understand why some people living with HIV in Africa avoid becoming infected with the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB) despite exposure to high-TB-risk circumstances. [More]
Researchers develop new computational method to track colorectal cancer progression

Researchers develop new computational method to track colorectal cancer progression

Team of researchers elaborated a computational method to track the progress of the colorectal cancer. It is a scientific advance that can bring new perspectives to discover the factors that push this pathology and the selection of efficient therapies. [More]
Scientists use Sanger sequencing to conduct detailed genetic screening of PD patients

Scientists use Sanger sequencing to conduct detailed genetic screening of PD patients

A team of scientists at the University of Granada has used a next-generation genetic sequencing method and a technique known as "Sanger sequencing" to conduct a detailed genetic screening of patients in Granada suffering from Parkinson's disease. [More]
Tiny doses of anti-HIV drug may be effective for treating Alzheimer's disease

Tiny doses of anti-HIV drug may be effective for treating Alzheimer's disease

For a promising pathway to treating Alzheimer's patients, "aim here." That's what National Institute of Standards of Technology researchers advised collaborators hunting for molecules that, by linking to a normally occurring enzyme, rev up the brain's capacity for clearing cholesterol--a boost associated with improvements in memory and other benefits in animal studies. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement