Genetic News and Research RSS Feed - Genetic News and Research

Researchers reveal common features responsible for antibiotic resistance

Researchers reveal common features responsible for antibiotic resistance

Treating bacterial infections with antibiotics is becoming increasingly difficult as bacteria develop resistance not only to the antibiotics being used against them, but also to ones they have never encountered before. By analyzing genetic and phenotypic changes in antibiotic-resistant strains of E. coli, researchers at the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center in Japan have revealed a common set of features that appear to be responsible for the development of resistance to several types of antibiotics. [More]
Researchers examine why Mexican-Americans at increased risk for Type 2 diabetes

Researchers examine why Mexican-Americans at increased risk for Type 2 diabetes

While people of Mexican ancestry are nearly twice as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes as people of European heritage, the majority of research in this area has focused on those of European origin. [More]
Eight researchers to receive 2015 Leibniz Prize

Eight researchers to receive 2015 Leibniz Prize

The new recipients of Germany's most prestigious research funding prize have been announced. In Bonn today, the Joint Committee of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) decided to award the 2015 Leibniz Prize to eight researchers. [More]
Research findings may lead to new treatment strategies for Ewing sarcoma

Research findings may lead to new treatment strategies for Ewing sarcoma

The genetic abnormality that drives the bone cancer Ewing sarcoma operates through two distinct processes - both activating genes that stimulate tumor growth and suppressing those that should keep cancer from developing. These findings by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators, published in the November issue of Cancer Cell, may lead to new therapies targeting these aberrant mechanisms. [More]
Secrets of success for pioneering research revealed

Secrets of success for pioneering research revealed

The British Pharmacological Society has announced the secrets of success for pioneering research along with the outcome of its annual 'Putting UK Pharmacology on the Map' vote. The vote selects sites of special scientific interest linked to achievements in pharmacology based on a ballot of MPs, peers and senior members of the scientific community. [More]
Tel Aviv University study throws spotlight on gene mutation responsible for premature ovarian failure

Tel Aviv University study throws spotlight on gene mutation responsible for premature ovarian failure

Premature ovarian failure, also known as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), affects 1% of all women worldwide. In most cases, the exact cause of the condition, which is often associated with infertility, is difficult to determine. [More]
New study finds high suicide rates among transgender veterans

New study finds high suicide rates among transgender veterans

Veterans of the U.S. armed forces who have received a diagnosis consistent with transgender status are more likely to have serious suicidal thoughts and plans and to attempt suicide. [More]
UK doctors to test cannabis-based medicine for children with severe epilepsy

UK doctors to test cannabis-based medicine for children with severe epilepsy

Children with severe epilepsy could be helped by a new treatment derived from the cannabis plant. [More]
Bacterial biofilms may increase colon cancer risk

Bacterial biofilms may increase colon cancer risk

Researchers from Johns Hopkins have found that dense mats of interacting bacteria, called biofilms, were present in the majority of cancers and polyps, particularly those on the right side of the colon. The presence of these bacterial bunches, they say, may represent an increased risk for colon cancer and could form the basis of new diagnostic tests. [More]
Researchers use novel technique to identify microlesions in brain tissue from epileptic patients

Researchers use novel technique to identify microlesions in brain tissue from epileptic patients

Using an innovative technique combining genetic analysis and mathematical modeling with some basic sleuthing, researchers have identified previously undescribed microlesions in brain tissue from epileptic patients. The millimeter-sized abnormalities may explain why areas of the brain that appear normal can produce severe seizures in many children and adults with epilepsy. [More]
Novel technique to identify biological markers in brain development

Novel technique to identify biological markers in brain development

With a unique, multi-faceted approach, researchers at the Lieber Institute for Brain Development have quantified the effect of previously unidentified anomalies in genetic expression that determine how the human brain develops from its earliest stages. [More]
Research finding could inspire new ideas for treating type 2 oculocutaneous albinism

Research finding could inspire new ideas for treating type 2 oculocutaneous albinism

Newly published research provides the first demonstration of how a genetic mutation associated with a common form of albinism leads to the lack of melanin pigments that characterizes the condition. [More]
Mitochondrial DNA may predict overall risk of frailty, death

Mitochondrial DNA may predict overall risk of frailty, death

New research from The Johns Hopkins University suggests that the amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) found in peoples’ blood directly relates to how frail they are medically. This DNA may prove to be a useful predictor of overall risk of frailty and death from any cause 10 to 15 years before symptoms appear. [More]
Preclinical study strongly supports NT-113 as potential new treatment for glioblastoma multiforme

Preclinical study strongly supports NT-113 as potential new treatment for glioblastoma multiforme

NewGen Therapeutics, Inc. today announced the publication of preclinical research strongly supporting NT-113, the company's novel irreversible pan-erbB inhibitor (EGFR, HER2 and HER4), as a potential new treatment for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in adults. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals begins ISIS-DMPK Rx clinical study in DM1 patients

Isis Pharmaceuticals begins ISIS-DMPK Rx clinical study in DM1 patients

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that it has initiated a study for ISIS-DMPK Rx in patients with Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 (DM1). DM1 is a rare genetic neuromuscular disease caused by the production of toxic dystrophia myotonica-protein kinase (DMPK) RNA in cells. ISIS-DMPKRx is specifically designed to reduce toxic DMPK RNA. [More]
Joslin study could lead to improved anti-aging drugs

Joslin study could lead to improved anti-aging drugs

In a study published today by Nature, researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center used a microscopic worm (C. elegans) to identify a new path that could lead to drugs to slow aging and the chronic diseases that often accompany it--and might even lead to better cosmetics. [More]
Scientists demonstrate technique for editing genome in sperm-producing adult stem cells

Scientists demonstrate technique for editing genome in sperm-producing adult stem cells

Scientists at Indiana University and colleagues at Stanford and the University of Texas have demonstrated a technique for "editing" the genome in sperm-producing adult stem cells, a result with powerful potential for basic research and for gene therapy. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify possible therapy to treat neurofibromatosis type 1

UT Southwestern researchers identify possible therapy to treat neurofibromatosis type 1

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a possible therapy to treat neurofibromatosis type 1 or NF1, a childhood neurological disease characterized by learning deficits and autism that is caused by inherited mutations in the gene encoding a protein called neurofibromin. [More]
ADIPOQ gene variations linked to colorectal cancer risk, new study reveals

ADIPOQ gene variations linked to colorectal cancer risk, new study reveals

Adiponectin, a collagen-like protein secreted by fat cells, derives from the ADIPOQ gene. Variations in this gene may increase risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and various cancers. A new study that links specific variations in the ADIPOQ gene to either higher or lower colorectal cancer risk is published in Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Back pain is exceptionally common. In fact, to not experience back pain at some point of your life would be thoroughly abnormal. Experiencing back pain is like becoming tired or becoming sad; we don’t necessarily like it, but it’s perfectly common. [More]