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UT Southwestern receives CPRIT grant to expand genetic screening services in North Texas

UT Southwestern receives CPRIT grant to expand genetic screening services in North Texas

Genetic screening services for rural and underserved populations will expand from six to 22 counties in North Texas under a $1.5 million grant from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas to UT Southwestern Medical Center. [More]
Study reveals subtypes, potential diagnostic and treatment clues for papillary thyroid carcinomas

Study reveals subtypes, potential diagnostic and treatment clues for papillary thyroid carcinomas

A comprehensive analysis of the genomes of nearly 500 papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC) – the most common form of thyroid cancer – has provided new insights into the roles of frequently mutated cancer genes and other genomic alterations that drive disease development. [More]
High risk for congenital heart defects in Down syndrome provides tool to identify changes in genes

High risk for congenital heart defects in Down syndrome provides tool to identify changes in genes

Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality in humans, involving a third copy of all or part of chromosome 21. In addition to intellectual disability, individuals with Down syndrome have a high risk of congenital heart defects. However, not all people with Down syndrome have them – about half have structurally normal hearts. [More]
Research could pave way for more effective drugs to treat inflammation

Research could pave way for more effective drugs to treat inflammation

Six Case Western Reserve scientists are part of an international team that has discovered two compounds that show promise in decreasing inflammation associated with diseases such as ulcerative colitis, arthritis and multiple sclerosis. [More]
Research finds link between autism spectrum disorder and air toxics

Research finds link between autism spectrum disorder and air toxics

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were more likely to have been exposed to higher levels of certain air toxics during their mothers' pregnancies and the first two years of life compared to children without the condition, according to the preliminary findings of a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health investigation of children in southwestern Pennsylvania. [More]
Researchers reveal how particular melanoma cells help tumors resist drugs

Researchers reveal how particular melanoma cells help tumors resist drugs

UNC School of Medicine researchers have pinpointed a set of intriguing characteristics in a previously unknown subpopulation of melanoma cancer cells in blood vessels of tumors. These cells, which mimic non-cancerous endothelial cells that normally populate blood vessels in tumors, could provide researchers with another target for cancer therapies. [More]
Nano-sized discovery helps explain bipolar disorder

Nano-sized discovery helps explain bipolar disorder

A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine® scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness. [More]
MIT researchers develop new way to model effects of cancer-causing genetic mutations

MIT researchers develop new way to model effects of cancer-causing genetic mutations

Sequencing the genomes of tumor cells has revealed thousands of genetic mutations linked with cancer. However, sifting through this deluge of information to figure out which of these mutations actually drive cancer growth has proven to be a tedious, time-consuming process. [More]
Longer looks: Obamacare in the midterm campaign; watching Ebola mutate; lessons on dying

Longer looks: Obamacare in the midterm campaign; watching Ebola mutate; lessons on dying

According to Kantar Media, a firm that tracks political advertising, health care is the main subject of campaign ads, especially Republican ones. Obamacare is unpopular-;over half of Americans disapprove of it. Republicans talk about it constantly on the campaign trail, though not as intemperately as they did during their own party's primaries. Democrats scarcely mention it (10/18). [More]
French hospital uses Sophia DDM Platform to improve diagnostic testing of congenital disorders

French hospital uses Sophia DDM Platform to improve diagnostic testing of congenital disorders

The Hospices Civils de Lyon, the second-largest University Hospital Network in France, has elected to use the Sophia Genetics Data Driven Medicine (DDM) Platform to support improvements in diagnostic testing for patients suffering from congenital disorders. [More]
New test could help physicians predict people who are at early stages of sepsis

New test could help physicians predict people who are at early stages of sepsis

A new test, developed by University of British Columbia researchers, could help physicians predict within an hour if a patient will develop severe sepsis so they can begin treatment immediately. [More]
Scientists use innovative exome sequencing strategy to identify new gene associated with ALS

Scientists use innovative exome sequencing strategy to identify new gene associated with ALS

Using an innovative exome sequencing strategy, a team of international scientists led by John Landers, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School has shown that TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin Alpha 4A protein, is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurological disorder also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease. [More]
Genetics underpin bullying victimisation influence on paranoia

Genetics underpin bullying victimisation influence on paranoia

Bullying victimisation in childhood may indicate genetic risk for later psychosis, rather than being an environmental trigger, say UK researchers. [More]
YEDA and XL-protein sign deal to commercialize PASylated IFN superagonis

YEDA and XL-protein sign deal to commercialize PASylated IFN superagonis

YEDA Research and Development Company Ltd., the technology transfer arm of the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel, and XL-protein GmbH, Germany, a privately owned biopharmaceutical company, have signed a business collaboration agreement to commercialize a PASylated interferon superagonist -- PAS-YNSα8 -- which has been jointly developed by scientists at the Weizmann Institute and XL-protein. [More]

Couple renews multi-million dollar commitment to screen newborn babies for SCID disorders

Frustrated with the slow pace of implementation of Newborn Screening for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID), Vicki and Fred Modell renewed a multi-million dollar commitment to screen every baby born in every state for this life threatening condition, often referred to as "Bubble Boy" disease. [More]

Cypher researchers identify new genetic cause of severe epileptic encephalopathy

Cypher Genomics, Inc., the genome informatics company, announced today the identification of de novo KCNB1 missense mutations as a novel genetic cause of severe epileptic encephalopathy. Cypher’s co-founder and Chief Scientific Officer Ali Torkamani, Ph.D. reviewed the data today at a platform presentation at the ASHG 2014 meeting being held October 18 to 22 in San Diego. [More]
Scientists identify potent inhibitors to combat common obesity gene

Scientists identify potent inhibitors to combat common obesity gene

Individuals who are genetically predisposed to obesity may soon have a therapeutic solution to combat their condition. A research team led by scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has identified several potent inhibitors that selectively target FTO, the common fat mass and obesity-associated gene. [More]
Finding could help improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise, normal aging

Finding could help improve treatment of hearing loss caused by noise, normal aging

Scientists have restored the hearing of mice partly deafened by noise, using advanced tools to boost the production of a key protein in their ears. [More]
New study reveals how cancer becomes drug resistant over time

New study reveals how cancer becomes drug resistant over time

Like a colony of bacteria or species of animals, cancer cells within a tumor must evolve to survive. A dose of chemotherapy may kill hundreds of thousands of cancer cells, for example, but a single cell with a unique mutation can survive and quickly generate a new batch of drug-resistant cells, making cancer hard to combat. [More]
Van Andel Research Institute commits $7.5M to support epigenetic therapy in cancer treatment

Van Andel Research Institute commits $7.5M to support epigenetic therapy in cancer treatment

The work of one of the Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) inaugural Dream Teams, launched in 2009 to focus on epigenetic therapy in cancer treatment, will continue with the commitment of $7.5 million from Van Andel Research Institute (VARI). [More]