Genetic News and Research RSS Feed - Genetic News and Research

Researchers develop new treatment that extends telomeres

Researchers develop new treatment that extends telomeres

Will extending telomeres lead to longer, healthier lives? Researchers have taken an important step toward answering this question by developing a new treatment used in the laboratory that extends telomeres. [More]
SLU researcher discovers new information about how antibiotics stop staph infections

SLU researcher discovers new information about how antibiotics stop staph infections

In research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Saint Louis University Mee-Ngan F. Yap, Ph.D., discovered new information about how antibiotics like azithromycin stop staph infections, and why staph sometimes becomes resistant to drugs. [More]
Study shows how gut bacteria can affect normal brain activity

Study shows how gut bacteria can affect normal brain activity

The hundred trillion bacteria living in an adult human--mostly in the intestines, making up the gut microbiome--have a significant impact on behavior and brain health. The many ways gut bacteria can impact normal brain activity and development, affect sleep and stress responses, play a role in a variety of diseases, and be modified through diet for therapeutic use are described in a comprehensive Review article in Journal of Medicinal Food, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Altered AHNAK gene may open door to improved treatment for keloid scars

Altered AHNAK gene may open door to improved treatment for keloid scars

Researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit have identified a gene that may offer a better understanding of how keloid scars develop and potentially open the door to improved treatment for the often painful, itchy and tender scars. [More]
Study uses 'systems genetics' approach to identify potential target for epilepsy

Study uses 'systems genetics' approach to identify potential target for epilepsy

A single gene that coordinates a network of about 400 genes involved in epilepsy could be a target for new treatments, according to research. [More]
International study identifies genetic factors that influence the size of brain structures

International study identifies genetic factors that influence the size of brain structures

An international study, which included researchers from NUI Galway, has identified significant genetic factors that influence the size of structures within the brain. It is hoped these new insights may help scientists better understand disorders such as schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. [More]
Monell Center receives NIH grant to develop clinical tool that can predict anosmia

Monell Center receives NIH grant to develop clinical tool that can predict anosmia

Monell Center scientist Kai Zhao, PhD, is principal investigator on a $1.5M 4-year grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, part of the National Institutes of Health, to further develop clinical methodology that can predict the path of air flow through a person's nasal passages. [More]
Dr. Hans Clevers receives ISSCR's McEwen Award for Innovation

Dr. Hans Clevers receives ISSCR's McEwen Award for Innovation

The International Society for Stem Cell Research has awarded Dr. Hans Clevers, senior author on two important papers published recently in the scientific journal Cell, the society's McEwen Award for Innovation. [More]
New study links inflammatory bowel diseases to increase in diversity of viruses

New study links inflammatory bowel diseases to increase in diversity of viruses

Inflammatory bowel diseases are associated with a decrease in the diversity of bacteria in the gut, but a new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has linked the same illnesses to an increase in the diversity of viruses. [More]
UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

An international group co-led by University of Alabama at Birmingham researcher Mary MacDougall, Ph.D., has unraveled the molecular basis for the rare, inherited genetic disorder, Singleton-Merten Syndrome (SMS). Individuals with SMS develop extreme, life-threatening calcification of the aorta and heart valves, early-onset periodontitis and root resorption of the teeth, decreases in bone density, and loss of bone tissue at the tips of fingers and toes. [More]
Colorectal cancer incidence increasing among young adults

Colorectal cancer incidence increasing among young adults

The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) among young adults ages 20-39 years has increased during the past 20-30 years, despite declining rates of CRC for the U.S. population overall. [More]
Cleveland Clinic researcher awarded grant to advance treatment of lethal prostate cancer

Cleveland Clinic researcher awarded grant to advance treatment of lethal prostate cancer

The Prostate Cancer Foundation has presented Nima Sharifi, M.D., Kendrick Family Endowed Chair for Prostate Cancer Research at Cleveland Clinic's Lerner Research Institute, a Challenge Award to advance the treatment of lethal prostate cancer. He is also co-investigator on a second Challenge Award that was also selected for funding. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism by which anti-inflammatory processes may cause Alzheimer's

Researchers uncover mechanism by which anti-inflammatory processes may cause Alzheimer's

Inflammation has long been studied in Alzheimer's, but in a counterintuitive finding reported in a new paper, University of Florida researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which anti-inflammatory processes may trigger the disease. [More]
Study identifies gene that may become resistant to current testicular cancer treatments

Study identifies gene that may become resistant to current testicular cancer treatments

A major research study has uncovered several new genetic mutations that could drive testicular cancer - and also identified a gene which may contribute to tumours becoming resistant to current treatments. [More]
Researchers reveal role of epigenetic factors in malignant skin cancer

Researchers reveal role of epigenetic factors in malignant skin cancer

Melanoma, the most aggressive of all skin cancer strains, is often fatal for patients due to the pronounced formation of metastases. Until now, a melanoma's rampant growth was mainly attributed to genetic causes, such as mutations in certain genes. However, researchers from the University of Zurich now reveal that so-called epigenetic factors play a role in the formation of metastases in malignant skin cancer. This opens up new possibilities for future cancer treatments. [More]
TAU's Yosef Shiloh receives Olav Thon Foundation's first international research award

TAU's Yosef Shiloh receives Olav Thon Foundation's first international research award

Norway's largest charitable organization, the Olav Thon Foundation, which invests heavily in medical research, awarded its first international research award in the medical and natural sciences to Tel Aviv University's Prof. Yosef Shiloh and Prof. Judith Campisi of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging, California. [More]
CAP, ASCO University and AMP partner to create Molecular Oncology Tumor Board series

CAP, ASCO University and AMP partner to create Molecular Oncology Tumor Board series

The College of American Pathologists, the American Society of Clinical Oncology's ASCO University, and the Association for Molecular Pathology recently announced their partnership in the creation of the Molecular Oncology Tumor Board series, an online and user-driven resource designed to help cancer care providers with the interpretation and understanding of tumor molecular profiling tests and studies. [More]
Cornell scientists develop new computational method to identify functional human genome

Cornell scientists develop new computational method to identify functional human genome

Striving to unravel and comprehend DNA's biological significance, Cornell University scientists have created a new computational method that can identify positions in the human genome that play a role in the proper functioning of cells, according to a report published Jan. 19 in the journal Nature Genetics. [More]
ENIGMA scientists discover eight genetic mutations that may erode or boost brain tissue

ENIGMA scientists discover eight genetic mutations that may erode or boost brain tissue

In the largest collaborative study of the brain to date, researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California led a global consortium of 190 institutions to identify eight common genetic mutations that appear to age the brain an average of three years. The discovery could lead to targeted therapies and interventions for Alzheimer's disease, autism and other neurological conditions. [More]
Personalized approaches to treating intellectual disability

Personalized approaches to treating intellectual disability

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have produced an approach that protects animal models against a type of genetic disruption that causes intellectual disability, including serious memory impairments and altered anxiety levels. [More]