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Scientists unravel new genetic immunodeficiency that makes children vulnerable to mild illnesses

Scientists unravel new genetic immunodeficiency that makes children vulnerable to mild illnesses

A team of scientists led by prof. Adrian Liston and prof. Isabelle Meyts were able to characterize a new genetic immunodeficiency resulting from a mutation in a gene named STAT2. [More]
TGen scientists identify potent inhibitory compound for treatment against glioblastoma

TGen scientists identify potent inhibitory compound for treatment against glioblastoma

A study led by scientists at the Translational Genomics Research Institute has identified "a potent inhibitory compound" in the elusive hunt for an improved treatment against glioblastoma, the most common and deadly type of adult brain cancer. [More]
Enzyme identified in baker's yeast can efficiently annihilate leukemia cells

Enzyme identified in baker's yeast can efficiently annihilate leukemia cells

An enzyme identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, commonly known as brewer's or baker's yeast, has passed in vitro trials, demonstrating its capacity to kill acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. [More]
Research findings could offer ways of fighting treatment resistance in oesophageal cancer

Research findings could offer ways of fighting treatment resistance in oesophageal cancer

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin have made exciting new findings that could offer a means of fighting resistance to treatment for people with oesophageal cancer. [More]
Inactive B2M genes can condition response of lung cancer patients to immunotherapy, study shows

Inactive B2M genes can condition response of lung cancer patients to immunotherapy, study shows

Researchers from the Genes and Cancer research group at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute have identified inactivating mutations in a number of genes that code for HLA-I histocompatibility complex proteins, which are involved in the immune response and can condition the tesponse of lung cancer patients to immunotherapy. [More]
COGENT scientists uncover genes responsible for cognitive ability

COGENT scientists uncover genes responsible for cognitive ability

An international team of scientists, led by Todd Lencz, PhD, professor at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health and Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, have unlocked some of the genes responsible for cognitive ability. [More]
Epigenetic changes drive successful metastases of pancreatic cancer cells

Epigenetic changes drive successful metastases of pancreatic cancer cells

A multicenter team of researchers reports that a full genomic analysis of tumor samples from a small number of people who died of pancreatic cancer suggests that chemical changes to DNA that do not affect the DNA sequence itself yet control how it operates confer survival advantages on subsets of pancreatic cancer cells. [More]
MGH researchers identify protein that may protect tumor-initiating cells in breast cancer

MGH researchers identify protein that may protect tumor-initiating cells in breast cancer

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have identified a protein that may play an essential role in maintaining a population of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) -- treatment-resistant cells responsible for cancer recurrence and metastasis -- in breast cancer, as well as a compound that appears to reduce the molecule's ability to protect TICs from the effects of chemotherapy. [More]
Drug-resistant deadly bacteria more widespread than previously thought, study finds

Drug-resistant deadly bacteria more widespread than previously thought, study finds

A family of highly drug-resistant and potentially deadly bacteria may be spreading more widely--and more stealthily -- than previously thought, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. [More]
Knowledge bank approach could help find best treatment option for AML patients

Knowledge bank approach could help find best treatment option for AML patients

An international collaboration led by clinical researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute has shown proof-of-concept that truly personalised therapy will be possible in the future for people with cancer. [More]
Researchers explore how metastatic pancreatic cancer gets ‘reprogrammed’ for optimal malignancy

Researchers explore how metastatic pancreatic cancer gets ‘reprogrammed’ for optimal malignancy

Metastatic pancreatic cancer -- cancer that has spread from the pancreas to other tissues and is responsible for most patient deaths -- changes its metabolism and is "reprogrammed" for optimal malignancy, according to new findings reported Jan. 16 in Nature Genetics. [More]
DNAstack receives NRC-IRAP funding to build cloud-based genomics software platform

DNAstack receives NRC-IRAP funding to build cloud-based genomics software platform

DNAstack, a Toronto based company, today is announcing the investment into its cloud-based genomics software platform from the National Research Council of Canada Industrial Research Assistance Program. [More]
People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with schizophrenia more likely to have diabetes than general population

People with early schizophrenia are at an increased risk of developing diabetes, even when the effects of antipsychotic drugs, diet and exercise are taken out of the equation, according to an analysis by researchers from King's College London. [More]
Endogenous retroviruses may have played significant role in development of the brain

Endogenous retroviruses may have played significant role in development of the brain

Over millions of years retroviruses have been incorporated into our human DNA, where they today make up almost 10 per cent of the total genome. [More]
Diet and exercise can help lessen damage caused by malaria, UTA study suggests

Diet and exercise can help lessen damage caused by malaria, UTA study suggests

The right amount of diet and exercise can help lessen damage to the heart and skeletal muscles brought on by malaria, according to a new UTA study. [More]
Concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline, research finds

Concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline, research finds

New research has found concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline in people who are at genetic risk for the condition. [More]
Harvard scientists discuss promise and peril of emerging IVG technique

Harvard scientists discuss promise and peril of emerging IVG technique

In vitro fertilization has transformed reproductive medicine and sparked a number of therapeutic and diagnostic breakthroughs. [More]
Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

New concepts of infectious disease are evolving with the realization that pathogens are key players in the development of progressive chronic diseases that originally were not thought to be infectious. Infection is well-known to be associated with numerous neurological diseases for which... [More]
NovaSeq, the new sequencer by Illumina, said to transform the field of genomics

NovaSeq, the new sequencer by Illumina, said to transform the field of genomics

Illumina, Inc., the global leader in next-generation sequencing technology, today introduced the NovaSeqTM Series, a new and scalable sequencing architecture expected one day to enable a $100 genome. Unveiled at the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference, this platform redefines high throughput sequencing with unrivaled throughput, ease of use, low per sample costs, and unmatched flexibility. [More]
Inhibition of EZH2 protein could be new strategy to treat multiple myeloma

Inhibition of EZH2 protein could be new strategy to treat multiple myeloma

In a study published in the scientific journal Oncotarget, researchers from Uppsala University show how the protein EZH2 affects the development of multiple myeloma, and that inhibition of EZH2 could be used as a new strategy to treat the disease. [More]
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