Genetic News and Research RSS Feed - Genetic News and Research

Research could help eventual treatment of degenerative muscle, brain diseases

Research could help eventual treatment of degenerative muscle, brain diseases

Our genetic information is stored in DNA, tiny strands of nucleic acid that contain instructions for the functioning of our bodies. To express this genetic data, our DNA is copied into RNA molecules, which then translate the instructions into proteins that perform tasks in our cells. [More]
Two young Egyptian scientists at TUM win ISS project

Two young Egyptian scientists at TUM win ISS project

Two researchers at Technische Universit-t M-nchen have won the 'International Space Station Research Competition' with their project 'Egypt Against Hepatitis C Virus.' As their prize, the scientists will see the International Space Station crew perform experiments on the space station. [More]
Research findings provide more details about earliest stages of neurodegenerative disease

Research findings provide more details about earliest stages of neurodegenerative disease

The link between a protein typically associated with Alzheimer's disease and its impact on memory and cognition may not be as clear as once thought, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Waisman Center. [More]
People who experience migraine in middle age may develop movement disorders later in life

People who experience migraine in middle age may develop movement disorders later in life

A new study suggests that people who experience migraine in middle age may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, or other movement disorders later in life. Those who have migraine with aura may be at double the risk of developing Parkinson's, according to the study published in the September 17, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine and The Wistar Institute have been awarded a prestigious $12.1 million SPORE grant from the National Cancer Institute. The five-year Specialized Programs of Research Excellence, or SPORE, grant will fund four new melanoma research projects that aim to translate fundamental laboratory discoveries into new therapeutics to treat melanoma and other skin cancers. [More]
Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Researchers at UT-Southwestern Medical Center have found that the most common variant of the circulating protein apolipoprotein E, called apoE3, helps repair the lining of blood vessels. Individuals with another variant, called apoE4, do not get the benefit of this repair, putting them at higher risk for cardiovascular disease. [More]
Common type of hospital-associated infections can be prevented with vaccine

Common type of hospital-associated infections can be prevented with vaccine

The most common type of hospital-associated infection may be preventable with a vaccine, new research in mice suggests. [More]
New approach to imaging metastatic tumors

New approach to imaging metastatic tumors

Bioluminescence, nanoparticles, gene manipulation - these sound like the ideas of a science fiction writer, but, in fact, they are components of an exciting new approach to imaging local and metastatic tumors. [More]
Studies explore role of STXBP5 gene in development of cardiovascular disease

Studies explore role of STXBP5 gene in development of cardiovascular disease

Two independent groups of researchers led by Sidney (Wally) Whiteheart, PhD, of the University of Kentucky, and Charles Lowenstein, MD, of the University of Rochester, have published important studies exploring the role that a gene called STXBP5 plays in the development of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Scientists find 23 new genetic variants that increase risk for prostate cancer

Scientists find 23 new genetic variants that increase risk for prostate cancer

In an analysis of genetic information among more than 87,000 men, a global team of scientists says it has found 23 new genetic variants - common differences in the genetic code -- that increase a man's risk for prostate cancer. The so-called "meta-analysis," believed to be the largest of its kind, has revealed once hidden mutations among men in a broad array of ethnic groups comprising men of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. [More]
Rosuvastatin promotes bone growth in mice with achondroplasia symptoms

Rosuvastatin promotes bone growth in mice with achondroplasia symptoms

Skeletal dysplasia is a group of rare diseases that afflict skeletal growth through abnormalities in bone and cartilage. Its onset hits at the fetal stage and is caused by genetic mutations. [More]
Sanofi, MyoKardia partner to develop targeted therapeutics for cardiomyopathies

Sanofi, MyoKardia partner to develop targeted therapeutics for cardiomyopathies

Sanofi and MyoKardia, Inc., a privately-held company leading the development of precision therapies for genetic heart disease, announced today a worldwide collaboration to discover and develop first-of-its-kind targeted therapeutics for heritable heart diseases known as cardiomyopathies, the most common forms of heart muscle disease. [More]
Scientists develop first blood test to diagnose major adult depression

Scientists develop first blood test to diagnose major adult depression

The first blood test to diagnose major depression in adults has been developed by Northwestern Medicine- scientists, a breakthrough approach that provides the first objective, scientific diagnosis for depression. [More]
Jacobsen syndrome linked to autism, find UCSD and SDSU researchers

Jacobsen syndrome linked to autism, find UCSD and SDSU researchers

A rare genetic disorder known as Jacobsen syndrome has been linked with autism, according to a recent joint investigation by researchers at San Diego State University and the University of California, San Diego. In addition to suggesting better treatment options for people with Jacobsen syndrome, the finding also offers more clues into the genetic underpinnings of autism. [More]
Study uncovers new genetic risk factor for deadly skin cancer

Study uncovers new genetic risk factor for deadly skin cancer

Buffers that guard against damage to the ends of chromosomes could hold the key to a better understanding of malignant melanoma - the deadliest form of skin cancer - according to new research from the University of Leeds. [More]
Catecholamine polymorphism influences opioid use

Catecholamine polymorphism influences opioid use

The catechol-O-methyltransferase rs4680 single nucleotide polymorphism could affect postoperative opioid consumption, study findings show. [More]
Age confounds relationship between ambulatory and office BP

Age confounds relationship between ambulatory and office BP

The relationship between ambulatory and office blood pressure varies with age, with the likelihood of white-coat hypertension increasing as people get older, a study shows. [More]
APOC3 gene variant dramatically reduces triglyceride levels in the blood

APOC3 gene variant dramatically reduces triglyceride levels in the blood

Research using data collected from around 4,000 healthy people in the UK has enabled scientists to identify a rare genetic variant that dramatically reduces levels of certain types of lipids in the blood. The study is the first to emerge from the UK10K Project's cohort of samples from the general public and demonstrates the power of whole genome sequencing at scale. [More]
New study sheds light on relationship between schizophrenia and smoking stems

New study sheds light on relationship between schizophrenia and smoking stems

Schizophrenia is associated with increased rates and intensity of tobacco smoking. A growing body of research suggests that the relationship between schizophrenia and smoking stems, in part, from an effort by patients to use nicotine to self-medicate symptoms and cognitive impairment associated with the disease. [More]
Reproductive cell division has mechanical safeguard against chromosome sorting errors

Reproductive cell division has mechanical safeguard against chromosome sorting errors

Reproductive cell division has evolved a simple, mechanical solution to avoid chromosome sorting errors, researchers report in the Sept. 11 Science Express. [More]