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Genomics is the study of the complete genetic material, including genes and their functions, of an organism.
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Removing volatile organic solvents from your 96-well microplates in minutes

Removing volatile organic solvents from your 96-well microplates in minutes

The MiniVap™ blowdown evaporator from Porvair Sciences takes just minutes to remove volatile organic solvents from your 96-well microplates. The MiniVap™ is the perfect tool for labs where smaller numbers of individual plates need drying. [More]
First Major Analysis Of Human Protein Atlas Is Published In Science

First Major Analysis Of Human Protein Atlas Is Published In Science

A research article published today in Science presents the first major analysis based on the Human Protein Atlas, including a detailed picture of the proteins that are linked to cancer, the number of proteins present in the bloodstream, and the targets for all approved drugs on the market. [More]
Researchers find CREB-activated genes in long-term memory-trained worms

Researchers find CREB-activated genes in long-term memory-trained worms

A new study has identified genes involved in long-term memory in the worm as part of research aimed at finding ways to retain cognitive abilities during aging. [More]
Cypher Genomics, Sequenom sign development agreement for noninvasive prenatal tests

Cypher Genomics, Sequenom sign development agreement for noninvasive prenatal tests

Cypher Genomics, Inc., the leading genome informatics company, and Sequenom, Inc., the leading molecular diagnostics company, today announced a development agreement for next generation noninvasive prenatal tests (NIPT). [More]
CAP, ASCO University and AMP partner to create Molecular Oncology Tumor Board series

CAP, ASCO University and AMP partner to create Molecular Oncology Tumor Board series

The College of American Pathologists, the American Society of Clinical Oncology's ASCO University, and the Association for Molecular Pathology recently announced their partnership in the creation of the Molecular Oncology Tumor Board series, an online and user-driven resource designed to help cancer care providers with the interpretation and understanding of tumor molecular profiling tests and studies. [More]
Cornell scientists develop new computational method to identify functional human genome

Cornell scientists develop new computational method to identify functional human genome

Striving to unravel and comprehend DNA's biological significance, Cornell University scientists have created a new computational method that can identify positions in the human genome that play a role in the proper functioning of cells, according to a report published Jan. 19 in the journal Nature Genetics. [More]
Penn researchers make breakthrough on novel anesthetics

Penn researchers make breakthrough on novel anesthetics

Penn Medicine researchers, in a continuation of their groundbreaking work to better understand how anesthesia works in the body, have found the first new class of novel anesthetics since the 1970s. Their findings, published in February issue of Anesthesiology, detail the processes through which the group uncovered these compounds. [More]
Trovagene, Genomac Research Institute to expand clinical collaboration

Trovagene, Genomac Research Institute to expand clinical collaboration

Trovagene, Inc., today announced it will expand the clinical collaboration with Genomac Research Institute in Prague, Czech Republic. Trovagene Precision Cancer Monitoring SM technology will be used in two prospective clinical studies for the early detection of emerging oncogene mutations indicative of resistance to targeted therapies used to treat colorectal and lung cancer. [More]
Research breakthrough in understanding mosquito reproductive process

Research breakthrough in understanding mosquito reproductive process

Diseases transmitted by mosquitoes have contributed to the death and suffering of millions throughout human history, earning the mosquito the title as the world's most dangerous animal. Even today, several devastating mosquito-borne diseases (such as malaria, dengue fever and West Nile virus) continue to rage. [More]
Changes in current Ebola virus epidemic could potentially interfere with experimental treatments

Changes in current Ebola virus epidemic could potentially interfere with experimental treatments

Researchers have tracked the genetic mutations that have occurred in the Ebola virus during the last four decades. Their findings, published in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, identified changes in the current West African outbreak strain that could potentially interfere with experimental, sequence-based therapeutics. [More]
Study unveils genetic architecture that enables parasite to develop antimalarial drug resistance

Study unveils genetic architecture that enables parasite to develop antimalarial drug resistance

The largest genome-wide association study to date of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum unveils a complex genetic architecture that enables the parasite to develop resistance to our most effective antimalarial drug, artemisinin. The results could help to improve early detection of emerging artemisinin resistance. [More]
Tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may trigger age-related macular degeneration

Tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may trigger age-related macular degeneration

New research from scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found that tiny lumps of calcium phosphate may be an important triggering factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a degenerative eye disease that can cause severe vision loss and blindness. [More]
Modelling the biological mesoscale: an interview with Professor Art Olson

Modelling the biological mesoscale: an interview with Professor Art Olson

The biological mesoscale range includes biological structures that range from 10 to 100 nanometers (billionths of a meter). Structures in this size range include viruses, cellular organelles, large molecular complexes, and any other internal cellular environments within that range. [More]
Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

It's been known for decades that some metals, including iron, accumulate in human tissues during aging and that toxic levels of iron have been linked to neurologic diseases, such as Parkinson's. Common belief has held that iron accumulation happens as a result of the aging process. [More]
Researchers uncover new gene tied to incurable eye disorder

Researchers uncover new gene tied to incurable eye disorder

An exhaustive hereditary analysis of a large Louisiana family with vision issues has uncovered a new gene tied to an incurable eye disorder called retinitis pigmentosa, according to an examination led by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Women with postpartum depression during pregnancy may face greater risk, study finds

Women with postpartum depression during pregnancy may face greater risk, study finds

When it comes to postpartum depression, one size does not fit all, according to a new study led by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers. [More]
John H. Postlethwait selected to receive GSA's George W. Beadle Award

John H. Postlethwait selected to receive GSA's George W. Beadle Award

The Genetics Society of America is pleased to announce that John H. Postlethwait, PhD (University of Oregon) has been selected to receive the Society's George W. Beadle Award for outstanding contributions to the community of genetics researchers. [More]
Major investment boosts Scotland's gene research

Major investment boosts Scotland's gene research

A major investment in gene sequencing technology will secure Scotland's place as a world leader in a genomics revolution that is set to transform healthcare. [More]
Study assesses therapeutic benefits of new oral immunotherapy for children allergic to wheat

Study assesses therapeutic benefits of new oral immunotherapy for children allergic to wheat

The study carried out by researchers from the Centre for Plant Biotechnology and Genomics along with the Allergy Department of the Hospital Infantil Universitario Niño Jesús of Madrid have shown that, most of the children that received this new oral immunotherapy treatment were able to eat 100 grams of wheat bread without side effects. This result has overcome the risk of accidental ingestion by patients with this allergy. This research could be the basis for large clinical trials with more patients with the aim of assessing the therapeutic benefit of this new approach. [More]
Beckman Coulter Genomics announces CAP accreditation

Beckman Coulter Genomics announces CAP accreditation

Beckman Coulter Genomics, a leading provider of DNA Sequencing Services announces today accreditation from the College of American Pathologists (CAP). [More]