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Sequenom's total revenues increase 62% to $39.8 million in Q2 2014

Sequenom's total revenues increase 62% to $39.8 million in Q2 2014

Sequenom, Inc., a life sciences company providing innovative genetic analysis solutions, today reported total revenues of $39.8 million for the second quarter of 2014, an increase of 62% compared to revenues of $24.5 million for the second quarter of 2013. [More]
Research findings could lead to new approaches for treating schizophrenia

Research findings could lead to new approaches for treating schizophrenia

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date, conducted with 80,000 people. [More]
Findings point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia

Findings point to biological mechanisms and pathways that may underlie schizophrenia

As part of a multinational, collaborative effort, researchers from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and scores of other institutions from all over the world have helped identify over 100 locations in the human genome associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia, in what is the largest genomic study published on any psychiatric disorder to date. [More]
UH Case Medical Center signs agreement with ARUP to offer DEEPGEN-HIV test

UH Case Medical Center signs agreement with ARUP to offer DEEPGEN-HIV test

University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center has signed an agreement with ARUP Laboratories, a major national clinical reference laboratory that offers an extensive menu of highly complex and unique medical tests to hospitals, medical schools, and other nonprofit and commercial organizations throughout the United States. [More]
Fabry disease awareness: an interview with Dr. Hartmann Wellhoefer, Head of Medical Affairs, Rare Disease, Shire

Fabry disease awareness: an interview with Dr. Hartmann Wellhoefer, Head of Medical Affairs, Rare Disease, Shire

Lysosomes are subcellular organelles that are present in most cells, with the major exception of red blood cells. [More]
Cannabis use and schizophrenia ‘share genetic risk’

Cannabis use and schizophrenia ‘share genetic risk’

Variants of genes that predispose people to developing schizophrenia also predispose them to using cannabis, a study of more than 2000 people has found. [More]
Reticular drusen linked to AMD progression

Reticular drusen linked to AMD progression

Four percent of individuals aged 49 years and above will develop reticular drusen over 15 years of follow-up, Australian study findings suggest, with the incidence higher in those with age-related macular degeneration risk factors. [More]
Vertex receives positive opinion from European CHMP for approval of KALYDECO for cystic fibrosis

Vertex receives positive opinion from European CHMP for approval of KALYDECO for cystic fibrosis

Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated today announced that the European Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use has issued a positive opinion recommending the approval of KALYDECO (ivacaftor) for people with cystic fibrosis (CF) ages 6 and older who have one of eight non-G551D gating mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. [More]
Study explores prevalence of chronic brain damage in retired NFL players

Study explores prevalence of chronic brain damage in retired NFL players

A study published online today in Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach provides a different take on previous information regarding the prevalence of chronic brain damage in retired NFL players. [More]
Newborn congenital adrenal hyperplasia screening justified

Newborn congenital adrenal hyperplasia screening justified

The Swedish neonatal screening programme successfully detected all cases of clinically classified salt-wasting congenital adrenal hyperplasia during a 26-year period, researchers report. [More]
Variations in BRCA2 and CHEK2 genes can increase lung cancer risk, study finds

Variations in BRCA2 and CHEK2 genes can increase lung cancer risk, study finds

New research confirms a vulnerability to lung cancer can be inherited and implicates the BRCA2 gene as harboring one of the involved genetic mutations. [More]
New software tool helps identify genetic mutations linked to increased risk for cancer

New software tool helps identify genetic mutations linked to increased risk for cancer

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and other institutions have applied a newly developed software tool to identify genetic mutations that contribute to a person's increased risk for developing common, complex diseases, such as cancer. [More]
Agena Bioscience expands ultrasensitive somatic mutation detection technology

Agena Bioscience expands ultrasensitive somatic mutation detection technology

Agena Bioscience, Inc., which recently acquired the Bioscience business of Sequenom, Inc., today announced expansion of the UltraSEEK™ technology, the first ultrasensitive somatic mutation detection technology for high-throughput and definitive interrogation of rare mutations that occur at less than 1% abundance in matched tissue, circulating plasma, and tumor samples. [More]
Agena Bioscience acquires Sequenom’s Bioscience business

Agena Bioscience acquires Sequenom’s Bioscience business

Agena Bioscience, Inc., a portfolio company of Telegraph Hill Partners (THP), today acquired the Bioscience business of Sequenom, Inc., which sells the MassARRAY® System for mass spectrometry-based detection of nucleic acids in research and clinical laboratories. [More]
Blood gene expression profile identifies patients with elevated risk of cardiovascular death

Blood gene expression profile identifies patients with elevated risk of cardiovascular death

A study of 338 patients with coronary artery disease has identified a gene expression profile associated with an elevated risk of cardiovascular death. Used with other indicators such as biochemical markers and family history, the profile - based on a simple blood test - may help identify patients who could benefit from personalized treatment and counseling designed to address risk factors. [More]
Immucor's PreciseType HEA test receives FDA approval to predict blood compatibility

Immucor's PreciseType HEA test receives FDA approval to predict blood compatibility

Immucor, Inc., a global leader in transfusion and transplantation diagnostics, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted approval for the company's PreciseType HEA test. [More]
Scientists identify key molecular switches that control age-related memory impairment

Scientists identify key molecular switches that control age-related memory impairment

Even among the healthiest individuals, memory and cognitive abilities decline with age. This aspect of normal aging can affect an individual's quality of life and capability to live independently but the rate of decline is variable across individuals. [More]
Armetheon reaches agreement with FDA on SPA for final pivotal trial of tecarfarin

Armetheon reaches agreement with FDA on SPA for final pivotal trial of tecarfarin

Armetheon, Inc., today announced that it has reached agreement with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on a Special Protocol Assessment (SPA) for the final pivotal trial of tecarfarin. [More]
Illumina launches VeriSeq PGS for preimplantation genetic screening of embryos

Illumina launches VeriSeq PGS for preimplantation genetic screening of embryos

Illumina, Inc. today announced the launch of VeriSeq PGS, a next-generation sequencing solution developed for preimplantation genetic screening of embryos using Illumina's NextSeq 500 and MiSeq® sequencing systems. [More]
New study sheds light on mysterious gene that influences cardiovascular health

New study sheds light on mysterious gene that influences cardiovascular health

A new study from researchers at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute (UOHI), published today in Cell Reports, sheds light on a mysterious gene that likely influences cardiovascular health. [More]