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Researchers examine critical role of hypoxia in induction, amplification of FOP lesions

Researchers examine critical role of hypoxia in induction, amplification of FOP lesions

The cellular response to the lack of oxygen fans the flames of flare-ups in a rare bone disorder. In fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a mutation triggers bone growth in muscles, which limits motion, breathing, and swallowing, among a host of progressive symptoms. [More]
Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Novel gene therapy can treat pulmonary hypertension linked with heart failure

Scientists have used a novel gene therapy to halt the progression of pulmonary hypertension, a form of high blood pressure in the lung blood vessels that is linked to heart failure, according to a study led by Roger J. Hajjar, MD, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Cardiovascular Research Center at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Older women with chronic health problems more likely to have lower quality of life

Older women with chronic health problems more likely to have lower quality of life

Researchers writing in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society recently learned that older women who are frail, and who have six or more chronic health conditions, are twice as likely to have a lower quality of life compared to women with less than three risk factors. [More]
Frailty, depression symptoms in older adults can affect spouses

Frailty, depression symptoms in older adults can affect spouses

Frailty, a condition that affects 10 percent of people aged 65 and older, can make older adults more prone to disability, falls, hospitalization and a shorter lifespan. Recently, researchers writing in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society examined the effects of frailty and depression on married couples. [More]
Under-expressed miR-9 gene may contribute to schizophrenia risk

Under-expressed miR-9 gene may contribute to schizophrenia risk

By turning skin cells into brain neurons, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have identified that certain tiny molecules aiding in gene expression, known as microRNAs (miRNAs), are under-expressed in the brains of the 14 schizophrenia patients they studied. Their findings, published online today in the journal Cell Reports, show that one of these molecules, a miRNA known as miR-9, is a risk factor that controls the activity of hundreds of genes. [More]
Bacteria-derived gut metabolites can affect brain’s myelin content and induce depression-like symptoms

Bacteria-derived gut metabolites can affect brain’s myelin content and induce depression-like symptoms

Specific combinations of gut bacteria produce substances that affect myelin content and cause social avoidance behaviors in mice, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in the medical journal eLife. This research suggests that targeting intestinal bacteria, or their metabolites, could be one way to treat debilitating psychiatric disorders and demyelinating diseases, like multiple sclerosis. [More]
New diagnostic approach may help physicians more efficiently screen for dementia

New diagnostic approach may help physicians more efficiently screen for dementia

A tiered diagnostic approach that incorporates clinical, imaging and laboratory data may help physicians more efficiently screen for neurodegenerative disorders such as dementia, according to the consensus of a multi-disciplinary panel of experts. [More]
Researchers evaluate TBI-associated risk factors in older adults

Researchers evaluate TBI-associated risk factors in older adults

Traumatic brain injury (TBI), a leading cause of death and disability, has become so common in recent times that it has been called a "silent epidemic." And because older adults are more likely to suffer TBI, have worse outcomes, and are less likely to survive their injury than younger adults, older adults are considered a "silent population" within this epidemic. [More]
Researchers examine effectiveness of antipsychotic drugs to prevent or treat delirium

Researchers examine effectiveness of antipsychotic drugs to prevent or treat delirium

In a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers examined whether or not antipsychotic drugs, which are sometimes used to prevent or treat delirium, are effective. [More]
Removal of Dnmt1 enzyme during OPC differentiation could lead to neurological symptoms

Removal of Dnmt1 enzyme during OPC differentiation could lead to neurological symptoms

The removal of the enzyme Dnmt1 during oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) differentiation in the central nervous system resulted in inefficient myelin formation and neurological deterioration, including loss of control of bodily movements, in mice, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in the medical journal Cell Reports. The results could lead to a new understanding of multiple sclerosis and other myelin disorders in humans. [More]
Lung ultrasound may be highly effective, safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children

Lung ultrasound may be highly effective, safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children

Lung ultrasound has been shown to be highly effective and safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children and a potential substitute for chest X-ray, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Results are currently published in the medical journal Chest. [More]
Wake Forest Baptist researchers looking for ways to keep older adults on their feet

Wake Forest Baptist researchers looking for ways to keep older adults on their feet

There's no getting around it: Simply getting around is a major issue for older adults.
"People are in nursing homes for two reasons, either they can't think or they can't walk," said Stephen Kritchevsky, Ph.D., director of the Sticht Center on Aging at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. North Carolina. "We're working very hard on the thinking part, and the walking part is equally important. [More]
Two common approaches to post-operative AF equally safe, effective

Two common approaches to post-operative AF equally safe, effective

Cleveland Clinic researchers, as part of the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network, have found that two common approaches to post-operative atrial fibrillation - rhythm control and rate control - are equally safe and effective. [More]
Mount Sinai Health System recognized as 'Leaders in LGBT Healthcare Equality' by HRC Foundation

Mount Sinai Health System recognized as 'Leaders in LGBT Healthcare Equality' by HRC Foundation

Six campuses of the Mount Sinai Health System - The Mount Sinai Hospital, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Mount Sinai St. Luke's, Mount Sinai West (formerly known as Mount Sinai Roosevelt), Mount Sinai Queens, and New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai - have been recognized as "Leaders in LGBT Healthcare Equality" by the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) Foundation, the educational arm of the country's largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) civil rights organization. [More]
Better oral hygiene, regular dental visits could slow down cognitive decline in older adults

Better oral hygiene, regular dental visits could slow down cognitive decline in older adults

Better oral hygiene and regular dental visits may play a role in slowing cognitive decline as people age, although evidence is not definitive enough to suggest that one causes the other. [More]
Study finds that married men over age 55 more likely to get colonoscopy

Study finds that married men over age 55 more likely to get colonoscopy

A national study involving 804 couples found that married men over age 55 were almost 20 percent more likely to have had a screening colonoscopy in the previous five years than men who were not married. Men married to women who are happier with the marital relationship were nearly 30 percent more likely. That rises to more than 40 percent if their wives were highly educated. [More]
CCN5 protein reverses cardiac fibrosis in heart failure models

CCN5 protein reverses cardiac fibrosis in heart failure models

CCN5, a matricellular protein, has been found to reverse established cardiac fibrosis in heart failure models, according to a study led by Roger J. Hajjar, MD, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Cardiovascular Research Center at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Woo Jin Park, PhD, Professor of Life Sciences at the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea. [More]
Mount Sinai Hospital uses M1 LUMI Bead loaded with doxorubicin for liver cancer treatment

Mount Sinai Hospital uses M1 LUMI Bead loaded with doxorubicin for liver cancer treatment

An innovative cancer treatment made of luminescent chemotherapy-filled beads injected into tumors through the wrist is now available for patients with inoperable and difficult-to-treat liver cancer. [More]
Unnecessary transitions can lead to increased health problems in older adults with dementia

Unnecessary transitions can lead to increased health problems in older adults with dementia

A transition is a physical move from one location to another with a stay of at least one night. For older adults, especially those with dementia, some transitions may be unavoidable and necessary. However, unnecessary transitions are linked to problems such as medication errors, hospital readmissions, and increased risk of death. [More]
Study helps healthcare providers to explore older patients' health values, set specific goals

Study helps healthcare providers to explore older patients' health values, set specific goals

Person-centered care puts individual values and preferences at the heart of healthcare decisions, measuring success by focusing attention on people's health and life goals. When you're an older adult faced with a life-threatening illness -- especially if you're also dealing with other chronic health problems -- your expressed values can guide your healthcare provider to helping you decide on the most appropriate treatment approach for you. [More]
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