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Gerontology is the study of the social, psychological and biological aspects of aging.
Elder financial exploitation resulting from age-related cognitive decline pose major economic threats

Elder financial exploitation resulting from age-related cognitive decline pose major economic threats

Protecting the wealth of older adults should be a high priority for banks, insurance companies, and others, according to the latest edition of Public Policy & Aging Report (PP&AR). Elder financial exploitation and diminished financial capacity resulting from age-related cognitive impairments both pose major economic threats, the issue finds. [More]
Stevens, Penn Nursing receive RWJF grant to determine effectiveness of transitional care model

Stevens, Penn Nursing receive RWJF grant to determine effectiveness of transitional care model

Stevens Institute of Technology and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing were recently funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to use policy flight simulators - pioneered by Stevens--to simulate use of the Transitional Care Model, developed by Penn Nursing. [More]

Numerous experts to attend Global Conference for Collaboration and Development on Regenerative Life Science in Beijing

In order to fulfill the mission of protecting life and health, and to inherit the advanced scientific technologies created by Dr. Rongxiang Xu in his lifetime and his spirit of healing the wounded and rescuing the dying, the Global Conference for Collaboration and Development on Regenerative Life Science cosponsored by The Chinese Red Cross Foundation and Beijing MEBO Institute for Burns, Wounds and Ulcers will be held in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Jan. 6, 2016. [More]
USC-led study finds link between anxiety and dementia

USC-led study finds link between anxiety and dementia

People who experienced high anxiety any time in their lives had a 48 percent higher risk of developing dementia compared to those who had not, according to a new study led by USC researchers. [More]
New GSA e-book provides detailed overviews of aging process across multiple organisms

New GSA e-book provides detailed overviews of aging process across multiple organisms

A new e-book published by The Gerontological Society of America provides a primary resource for detailed overviews of the aging process across multiple organisms -- from microbes to humans. This seminal publication, "Molecular and Cellular Biology of Aging," is intended as a textbook for emerging scholars of all levels. [More]

Tetyana Shippee named recipient of 2015 Senior Service America Senior Scholar Award

The Gerontological Society of America and Senior Service America, Inc., have named Tetyana P. Shippee, PhD, of the University of Minnesota as the 2015 recipient of the Senior Service America Senior Scholar Award for Research Related to Disadvantaged Older Adults. [More]
ApoE4-carrying men with Alzheimer's disease at risk of brain bleeds

ApoE4-carrying men with Alzheimer's disease at risk of brain bleeds

A common genetic variation, ApoE4, linked to Alzheimer's disease greatly raises the likelihood of tiny brain bleeds in some men, scientists have found. [More]
Study finds high prevalence of dehydration in older people living in UK care homes

Study finds high prevalence of dehydration in older people living in UK care homes

One in every five older people living in UK care homes has dehydration, suggesting that they are not drinking enough to keep themselves healthy. [More]
Negative stereotypes have adverse effects on patients' health

Negative stereotypes have adverse effects on patients' health

A national study led by a USC researcher found people who encountered the threat of being judged by negative stereotypes related to weight, age, race, gender, or social class in health care settings reported adverse effects. [More]
Prevalence of frailty in older people varies by region and race

Prevalence of frailty in older people varies by region and race

A large-scale survey of older Americans living at home or in assisted living settings found that 15 percent are frail, a diminished state that makes people more vulnerable to falls, chronic disease and disability, while another 45 percent are considered pre-frail, or at heightened risk of becoming physically diminished. [More]
WSU awarded nearly $1 million to train social workers and nurses in SBIRT

WSU awarded nearly $1 million to train social workers and nurses in SBIRT

Wayne State University has been awarded nearly $1 million to train social work and nursing students to assess patients in primary care settings for substance abuse behaviors. [More]
Genes that may mitigate smoking damage and cancer identified

Genes that may mitigate smoking damage and cancer identified

Smoking has been shown to have drastic consequences for lifespan and disease progression, and it has been suggested that cigarette exposure may impact the risk of death and disease via its acceleration of the aging process. Not all smokers experience early mortality, however, and a small proportion manage to survive to extreme ages. [More]
World expert panel recommends routine brain health screening for adults older than 70

World expert panel recommends routine brain health screening for adults older than 70

A panel of world experts in aging convened at Saint Louis University recommended that everyone 70 and older should have their memory and reasoning ability evaluated annually by a doctor or health care provider. [More]
Smoking may not always shorten life, cause cancer

Smoking may not always shorten life, cause cancer

Smoking has been shown to have drastic consequences for lifespan and disease progression, and it has been suggested that cigarette exposure may impact the risk of death and disease via its acceleration of the aging process. Not all smokers experience early mortality, however, and a small proportion manage to survive to extreme ages. [More]
Prenatal exposure to historical Ukraine Famine increases risk for Type 2 diabetes

Prenatal exposure to historical Ukraine Famine increases risk for Type 2 diabetes

Men and women exposed in early gestation to the man-made Ukrainian Famine of 1932-33 in regions with extreme food shortages were 1.5 times more likely to be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in adulthood. [More]
Kyriakos S. 'Kokos' Markides selected as the 2015 recipient of GSA's Robert W. Kleemeier Award

Kyriakos S. 'Kokos' Markides selected as the 2015 recipient of GSA's Robert W. Kleemeier Award

The Gerontological Society of America -- the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging -- has chosen Kyriakos S. "Kokos" Markides, PhD, of the University of Texas Medical Branch as the 2015 recipient of the Robert W. Kleemeier Award. [More]
Study: CPR usually saves lives on TV, but not in real life

Study: CPR usually saves lives on TV, but not in real life

If you think that performing CPR on a person whose heart has stopped is a surefire way to save their life, you may be watching too much TV. [More]

GSA selects Eric R. Kingson for 2015 Donald P. Kent Award

The Gerontological Society of America -- the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging -- has chosen Eric R. Kingson, MPA, PhD, of Syracuse University's School of Social Work as the 2015 recipient of the Donald P. Kent Award. [More]
Mary Naylor named recipient of GSA's Doris Schwartz Gerontological Nursing Research Award

Mary Naylor named recipient of GSA's Doris Schwartz Gerontological Nursing Research Award

The Gerontological Society of America -- the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging -- has chosen Mary Naylor, PhD, RN, FAAN, of the University of Pennsylvania as the 2015 recipient of the Doris Schwartz Gerontological Nursing Research Award. [More]

Research reveals why older adults who undergo general anesthesia experience postoperative delirium

Newly published research from the Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology at the Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine explains why up to half of older adults who undergo general anesthesia develop postoperative delirium - the sudden onset of confusion, aggression or agitated behavior that could progress to dementia. The findings indicate that older patients who are undergoing surgery may benefit from a less-potent, slower-acting anesthetic. [More]
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