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Gerontology is the study of the social, psychological and biological aspects of aging.
Incorporating laughter into exercise program could provide health benefits to older adults

Incorporating laughter into exercise program could provide health benefits to older adults

Incorporating laughter into a physical activity program that is focused on strength, balance and flexibility could improve older adults' mental health, aerobic endurance and confidence in their ability to exercise, according to a study led by Georgia State University. [More]
Wayne State receives NIH funding to advance brain aging research

Wayne State receives NIH funding to advance brain aging research

Wayne State University has received a $3.6 million grant from the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health for a project that will advance knowledge of brain aging, its relation to cognitive performance and the role of common vascular and metabolic risk factors in shaping the trajectories of aging. [More]
International conference on longevity to be held in Brussels for 3 days

International conference on longevity to be held in Brussels for 3 days

The Eurosymposium on Healthy Ageing is an international event that provides a unique opportunity for researchers, government officials, biotech executives, entrepreneurs, and non-governmental institutions from around the world to meet, network, and forge new scientific collaborations. [More]
Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Are there any ways of preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease or other forms of age-associated dementia? While several previously published studies have suggested a protective effect for cognitive activities such as reading, playing games or attending cultural events, questions have been raised about whether these studies reveal a real cause-and-effect relationship or if the associations could result from unmeasured factors. [More]
GSA selects Kali St. Marie Thomas as recipient of 2016 Carroll L. Estes Rising Star Award

GSA selects Kali St. Marie Thomas as recipient of 2016 Carroll L. Estes Rising Star Award

The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) -- the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging -- has chosen Kali St. Marie Thomas, PhD, MA, of Brown University and the Providence VA Medical Center as the 2016 recipient of the Carroll L. Estes Rising Star Award. [More]
Mayo Clinic, Geroscience Network researchers aim to accelerate pace of aging research

Mayo Clinic, Geroscience Network researchers aim to accelerate pace of aging research

Mayo Clinic, along with other members of the Geroscience Network, has published six manuscripts that map strategies for taking new drugs that target processes underlying aging into clinical trials. [More]
Researchers find causal link between senescent cells and age-related osteoarthritis

Researchers find causal link between senescent cells and age-related osteoarthritis

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have reported a causal link between senescent cells — cells that accumulate with age and contribute to frailty and disease — and osteoarthritis in mice. [More]
Working or volunteering could decrease chances of physical disability in elders

Working or volunteering could decrease chances of physical disability in elders

Working or volunteering can reduce the chances of chronic health conditions leading to physical disability in older Americans, according to researchers at Georgia State University and Florida State University. [More]
Older adults experience restriction on rights to sexual freedom in assisted-living facilities, study finds

Older adults experience restriction on rights to sexual freedom in assisted-living facilities, study finds

Older adults in assisted-living facilities experience limits to their rights to sexual freedom because of a lack of policies regarding the issue and the actions of staff and administrators at these facilities, according to research conducted by the Gerontology Institute at Georgia State University. [More]
Loss of senescent cells improves pulmonary function in mice

Loss of senescent cells improves pulmonary function in mice

Most cells can divide only a limited number of times and eventually undergo permanent cell cycle arrest, a state known as cellular senescence. [More]
Penn's ADCC receives $8.8 million grant to continue research on treatment for AD and related dementias

Penn's ADCC receives $8.8 million grant to continue research on treatment for AD and related dementias

The University of Pennsylvania's Alzheimer's Disease Core Center has been awarded an estimated $8.8 million over five years from the National Institute on Aging to continue its mission of investigating mechanisms, diagnostics, treatments and strategies for Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and related dementias including Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Lewy Body dementia (LBD) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). [More]
Regular physical exercise could lead to higher brain volumes and decreased dementia risk

Regular physical exercise could lead to higher brain volumes and decreased dementia risk

Using the landmark Framingham Heart Study to assess how physical activity affects the size of the brain and one's risk for developing dementia, UCLA researchers found an association between low physical activity and a higher risk for dementia in older individuals. [More]
Researchers quantify impact of hyperkyphosis on decline in pulmonary function

Researchers quantify impact of hyperkyphosis on decline in pulmonary function

Researchers from the Harvard affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research, have published a recent article in Journals of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, suggesting that preventing or slowing progression of hyperkyphosis may reduce pulmonary decline in older adults. [More]
Duke Health study shows physical declines start earlier than detected

Duke Health study shows physical declines start earlier than detected

Physical declines begin sooner in life than typically detected, often when people are still in their 50s, according to a Duke Health study that focused on a large group of U.S. adults across a variety of age groups. [More]
Patient characteristics, outcomes differ for indoor and outdoor fallers, study shows

Patient characteristics, outcomes differ for indoor and outdoor fallers, study shows

Falling can have serious consequences for older adults, including a loss of function and increased risk of institutionalization. [More]
Researchers discover novel neuroprotection strategies to slow progression of Parkinson's disease

Researchers discover novel neuroprotection strategies to slow progression of Parkinson's disease

Using a robust model for Parkinson's disease, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers and colleagues have discovered an interaction in neurons that contributes to Parkinson's disease, and they have shown that drugs now under development may block the process. [More]
Delirium in older surgical patients may be linked to long-term cognitive decline

Delirium in older surgical patients may be linked to long-term cognitive decline

Researchers from the Harvard Medical School - affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research have found increasing evidence that delirium in older surgical patients may be associated with long-term cognitive decline. [More]
Researcher receives $1.9 million grant to study development of memory networks in children

Researcher receives $1.9 million grant to study development of memory networks in children

Noa Ofen, Ph.D., a Wayne State University researcher in lifespan cognitive neuroscience, received a five-year, $1.9 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health to study the development of memory networks in children. [More]
Study examines how frequently older adults with diagnosed and undiagnosed dementia perform unsafe activities

Study examines how frequently older adults with diagnosed and undiagnosed dementia perform unsafe activities

Dementia currently affects some 5 million people in the U.S., and that number is expected to triple by 2050. Having dementia affects the way you think, act, and make decisions. [More]
In-hospital program improves community mobility, posthospitalization function in older adults

In-hospital program improves community mobility, posthospitalization function in older adults

Decreased mobility during hospitalization for older adults is associated with increased risk of death, nursing home admission and functional decline. University of Alabama at Birmingham investigators found that patients who participated in a mobility program were less likely to experience a decline in mobility when compared to the usual care provided during hospilization. [More]
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