Glioblastoma News and Research RSS Feed - Glioblastoma News and Research

Glioblastoma is the most aggressive and malignant form of glioma, a type of primary brain cancer. Surgery is often used to treat gliomas, along with radiation. However, since surgery and radiation fail to cure the disease, doctors may turn to additional radiation or chemotherapy. In early stages glioblastoma tumors often grow without symptoms and therefore can become quite large before symptoms arise. When the tumor becomes symptomatic, tumor growth is usually very rapid and is accompanied by altered brain function, and if left untreated the disease becomes lethal. Although primary treatment is often successful in temporarily stopping the progression of the tumor, glioblastomas almost always recur and become lethal.
UT Southwestern researchers find new potential target for halting tumor growth

UT Southwestern researchers find new potential target for halting tumor growth

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have discovered that brain tumors are capable of burning acetate for fuel, providing a new potential target for halting tumor growth. [More]
Two orphan receptor proteins exert fatal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells

Two orphan receptor proteins exert fatal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells

Two related proteins exert a lethal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells when activated with a small molecule, say researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. [More]
Preclinical study strongly supports NT-113 as potential new treatment for glioblastoma multiforme

Preclinical study strongly supports NT-113 as potential new treatment for glioblastoma multiforme

NewGen Therapeutics, Inc. today announced the publication of preclinical research strongly supporting NT-113, the company's novel irreversible pan-erbB inhibitor (EGFR, HER2 and HER4), as a potential new treatment for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in adults. [More]
CMC Biologics, OncoSynergy partner to develop novel potential treatment for Ebola

CMC Biologics, OncoSynergy partner to develop novel potential treatment for Ebola

CMC Biologics and OncoSynergy have entered into an agreement for process development and GMP manufacture of OS2966 – a novel potential treatment for Ebola. The investigational drug candidate, designed to inhibit a major cellular adhesion receptor (CD29) that is fundamental for progression of aggressive and resistant cancer tumors, was granted orphan drug designation by the U.S. FDA earlier this year in the treatment of glioblastoma. [More]
Pre-clinical studies confirm TRXE-009 as new potential treatment for melanoma

Pre-clinical studies confirm TRXE-009 as new potential treatment for melanoma

Novogen Limited, Australian/US biotechnology company, today announces that it has confirmed that its lead candidate product, TRXE-009, originally developed for the treatment of brain cancers, has been shown in pre-clinical studies also to be highly active against melanoma. [More]
UC Davis researchers uncover complex relationship between p53 and Rbm38 proteins

UC Davis researchers uncover complex relationship between p53 and Rbm38 proteins

Scientists have long known the p53 protein suppresses tumors. However, a recent animal study by UC Davis researchers has uncovered a complicated relationship between p53 and another protein, Rbm38, highlighting how the body calibrates protein levels. Too much Rbm38 reduces p53 levels, increasing the risk of cancer. [More]
New MIT study implicates RNA-binding proteins in regulation of cancer

New MIT study implicates RNA-binding proteins in regulation of cancer

A new study from MIT implicates a family of RNA-binding proteins in the regulation of cancer, particularly in a subtype of breast cancer. These proteins, known as Musashi proteins, can force cells into a state associated with increased proliferation. [More]
New statistical model enables better identification of different cell types in solid tumors

New statistical model enables better identification of different cell types in solid tumors

A new statistical model developed by a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute may enable physicians to create personalized cancer treatments for patients based on the specific genetic mutations found in their tumors. [More]
Brunel scientists find way to target hard-to-reach cancers using 'Trojan horse' nanoparticles

Brunel scientists find way to target hard-to-reach cancers using 'Trojan horse' nanoparticles

Scientists at Brunel University London have found a way of targeting hard-to-reach cancers and degenerative diseases using nanoparticles, but without causing the damaging side effects the treatment normally brings. [More]
Heat-shock protein 90 enables ER+ breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy

Heat-shock protein 90 enables ER+ breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy

Long known for its ability to help organisms successfully adapt to environmentally stressful conditions, the highly conserved molecular chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) also enables estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy. [More]
Henry Ford Hospital recruits patients to participate in brain cancer clinical trial

Henry Ford Hospital recruits patients to participate in brain cancer clinical trial

Henry Ford Hospital today announced that it is actively recruiting patients to participate in a clinical trial taking place at the Hermelin Brain Tumor Center which is showing promising results in patients with brain cancer. [More]
Scientists suspect role of mini-chromosomes in cancers, diseases caused by gene mutations

Scientists suspect role of mini-chromosomes in cancers, diseases caused by gene mutations

Cancers are due to genetic aberrations in certain cells that gain the ability to divide indefinitely. This proliferation of sick cells generates tumors, which gradually invade healthy tissue. Therefore, current therapies essentially seek to destroy cancer cells to stop their proliferation. Through high-throughput genetic sequencing of glioblastoma cells, one of the most deadly brain tumors, a team of geneticists from the University of Geneva's (UNIGE) Faculty of Medicine discovered that some of these mutations are caused by supplemental extrachromosomal DNA fragments, called double minutes, which enable cancer cells to better adapt to their environment and therefore better resist to treatments meant to destroy them. [More]
CytRx's clinical trials for aldoxorubicin placed on partial clinical hold

CytRx's clinical trials for aldoxorubicin placed on partial clinical hold

CytRx Corporation, a biopharmaceutical research and development company specializing in oncology, today announced that the Company has received written notice from the United States Food and Drug Administration that its clinical trials for aldoxorubicin have been placed on partial clinical hold. [More]
Research shows that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in glioblastoma, brain metastases

Research shows that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in glioblastoma, brain metastases

New evidence that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in glioblastoma and brain metastases was presented today by Dr Anna Sophie Berghoff at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland. [More]
3SBio enters into exclusive license agreement with PharmAbcine for Tanibirumab

3SBio enters into exclusive license agreement with PharmAbcine for Tanibirumab

3SBio Inc., a leading China-based biotechnology company focused on researching, developing, manufacturing and marketing biopharmaceutical products, today announced it has entered into an exclusive license with PharmAbcine, Inc. for the development, manufacturing and marketing of Tanibirumab, an anti-VEGFR2/KDR antibody for cancer in the territory of Greater China (including Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) and several emerging countries, including Thailand, Brazil and Russia. [More]
Study gives a roadmap for future brain cancer vaccines

Study gives a roadmap for future brain cancer vaccines

Glioblastoma is the most common aggressive primary brain tumor, and despite advances in standard treatment, the median survival is about 15 months (compared to 4 months without treatment). [More]
Study identifies genetic alterations that contribute to growth and recurrence of Ewing sarcoma

Study identifies genetic alterations that contribute to growth and recurrence of Ewing sarcoma

An international collaboration has identified frequent mutations in two genes that often occur together in Ewing sarcoma (EWS) and that define a subtype of the cancer associated with reduced survival. [More]
Researchers identify potential therapeutic target for glioblastoma

Researchers identify potential therapeutic target for glioblastoma

A multicenter team of researchers has identified an enzyme key to the survival and spread of glioblastoma cancer cells that is not present in healthy brain cells, making the enzyme a promising therapeutic target. [More]
CytRx provides overview of clinical development programs, reports 2014 Q3 financial results

CytRx provides overview of clinical development programs, reports 2014 Q3 financial results

CytRx Corporation (CYTR), a biopharmaceutical research and development company specializing in oncology, today reported financial results for the three months ended September 30, 2014, and also provided an overview of recent accomplishments by and upcoming milestones for its clinical development programs. [More]
Scientists devise novel way to use stem cells in fight against brain cancer

Scientists devise novel way to use stem cells in fight against brain cancer

Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have devised a new way to use stem cells in the fight against brain cancer. A team led by neuroscientist Khalid Shah, MS, PhD, who recently demonstrated the value of stem cells loaded with cancer-killing herpes viruses, now has a way to genetically engineer stem cells so that they can produce and secrete tumor-killing toxins. [More]