Glioblastoma News and Research RSS Feed - Glioblastoma News and Research

Glioblastoma is the most aggressive and malignant form of glioma, a type of primary brain cancer. Surgery is often used to treat gliomas, along with radiation. However, since surgery and radiation fail to cure the disease, doctors may turn to additional radiation or chemotherapy. In early stages glioblastoma tumors often grow without symptoms and therefore can become quite large before symptoms arise. When the tumor becomes symptomatic, tumor growth is usually very rapid and is accompanied by altered brain function, and if left untreated the disease becomes lethal. Although primary treatment is often successful in temporarily stopping the progression of the tumor, glioblastomas almost always recur and become lethal.
Specific immune system genes may determine how long people can live with glioblastoma

Specific immune system genes may determine how long people can live with glioblastoma

Researchers have identified a group of immune system genes that may play a role in how long people can live after developing a common type of brain cancer called glioblastoma multiforme, a tumor of the glial cells in the brain. [More]
Clinical trials of anti-cancer agent PAC-1 continue to progress with anonymous funding

Clinical trials of anti-cancer agent PAC-1 continue to progress with anonymous funding

Clinical trials of the anti-cancer agent PAC-1 are continuing to expand, thanks to a $7 million angel investment from an anonymous contributor who originally invested $4 million to help get the compound this far in the drug-approval pipeline. [More]
Mitoxantrone for MS linked to colorectal cancer risk

Mitoxantrone for MS linked to colorectal cancer risk

Treatment with mitoxantrone for multiple sclerosis carries only a mildly increased risk of malignancy overall, but the risk of colorectal cancer and leukaemia is heightened, researchers have found. [More]
Investigational drug abemaciclib shows durable clinical activity for variety of cancer types

Investigational drug abemaciclib shows durable clinical activity for variety of cancer types

The investigational anticancer therapeutic abemaciclib, which targets CDK4 and CDK6, showed durable clinical activity when given as continuous single-agent therapy to patients with a variety of cancer types, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), glioblastoma, and melanoma, according to results from a phase I clinical trial. [More]
Small lipid nanocarrier may deliver chemotherapeutic drug more efficiently to brain tumor cells

Small lipid nanocarrier may deliver chemotherapeutic drug more efficiently to brain tumor cells

Great discoveries do come in small packages. Few know that better than Ann-Marie Broome, Ph.D., who feels nanotechnology holds the future of medicine with its ability to deliver powerful drugs in tiny, designer packages. [More]
Umea University researchers find link between vitamin E and brain tumours

Umea University researchers find link between vitamin E and brain tumours

Researchers at Umea University in Sweden and the Cancer Registry of Norway have studied possible causes behind the development of brain tumours. [More]
AstraZeneca, MedImmune to provide update on extensive oncology pipeline at ASCO 2016

AstraZeneca, MedImmune to provide update on extensive oncology pipeline at ASCO 2016

AstraZeneca and its global biologics research and development arm, MedImmune, will provide an update on their extensive oncology pipeline at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago, USA, on 3-7 June 2016. [More]
Flavopiridol drug could be effective strategy to impair brain cancer growth

Flavopiridol drug could be effective strategy to impair brain cancer growth

Glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer is a deadly disease for which at present there is no cure. Now, researchers have published research results that show how repurposing the old drug flavopiridol could be an effective strategy to cut short sugar availability and impair cancer growth. [More]
Gene therapy shows promise in treating glioblastoma

Gene therapy shows promise in treating glioblastoma

A team from the International School for Advanced Studies in Trieste has obtained very promising results by applying gene therapy to glioblastoma. [More]
Experimental therapy stops glioblastoma, high-grade gliomas in human cells and mouse models

Experimental therapy stops glioblastoma, high-grade gliomas in human cells and mouse models

Researchers report in the journal Cancer Cell an experimental therapy that in laboratory tests on human cells and mouse models stops aggressive, treatment-resistant and deadly brain cancers called glioblastoma and high-grade gliomas. [More]
Study reveals glioblastoma subtypes tend to develop in different regions of the brain

Study reveals glioblastoma subtypes tend to develop in different regions of the brain

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have demonstrated that distinct types of glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer in adults, tend to develop in different regions of the brain. This finding provides an explanation for how the same cancer-causing mutation can give rise to different types of brain malignancies. [More]
OSMR gene plays key role in driving growth of glioblastoma tumors

OSMR gene plays key role in driving growth of glioblastoma tumors

Glioblastoma is the most aggressive type of brain tumor in adults. Unfortunately, there are no effective treatments for the disease. On average, patients succumb just 16 months after diagnosis. [More]
Scientists derive first molecular model of critical transporter at blood-brain barrier

Scientists derive first molecular model of critical transporter at blood-brain barrier

Scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School have derived a structural model of a transporter at the blood-brain barrier called Mfsd2a. This is the first molecular model of this critical transporter, and could prove important for the development of therapeutic agents that need to be delivered to the brain --- across the blood-brain barrier. In future, this could help treat neurological disorders such as glioblastoma. [More]
Scientists examine PD-1-expressing regulatory T cells in aggressive brain cancer

Scientists examine PD-1-expressing regulatory T cells in aggressive brain cancer

Immunotherapy represents an exciting advance in cancer treatment that harnesses the immune system to seek and destroy cancer cells. [More]
Researchers reposition existing prazosin drug to combat glioblastoma

Researchers reposition existing prazosin drug to combat glioblastoma

Treatments available for glioblastoma—malignant brain tumors—have little effect. An international collaboration led by the Laboratoire Neurosciences Paris-Seine tested active ingredients from existing medications and eventually identified one compound of interest, prazosin, on these tumors. Not only did it seem to be effective in this type of cancer, but it also acted on a signaling pathway that is common with other cancers. [More]
Proteins can be used as targets to deliver drugs into stressed cancer cells

Proteins can be used as targets to deliver drugs into stressed cancer cells

Targeted missiles that can enter cancer cells and deliver lethal cell toxins without harming surrounding healthy tissue. This has been a long-standing vision in cancer research, but it has proved difficult to accomplish. A research group at Lund University in Sweden has now taken some crucial steps in this direction. [More]
Newly discovered player in epigenetic regulation closely linked to known cancer promoters

Newly discovered player in epigenetic regulation closely linked to known cancer promoters

If genes form the body's blueprint, then the layer of epigenetics decides which parts of the plan get built. Unfortunately, many cancers hijack epigenetics to modulate the expression of genes, thus promoting cancer growth and survival. [More]
Penn researchers report results of CAR therapy trial in brain cancer patients

Penn researchers report results of CAR therapy trial in brain cancer patients

Immune cells engineered to seek out and attack a type of deadly brain cancer known as glioblastoma (GBM) were found to have an acceptable safety profile and successfully migrate to and infiltrate tumors, researchers from Penn Medicine and Harvard University reported at the AACR Annual Meeting 2016. [More]
Low-carbohydrate diet helps reduce growth of glioblastoma tumor cells in mouse models

Low-carbohydrate diet helps reduce growth of glioblastoma tumor cells in mouse models

University of Florida Health researchers have slowed a notoriously aggressive type of brain tumor in mouse models by using a low-carbohydrate diet. [More]
Compound from unique blue-green algae could be key to next anti-cancer drug

Compound from unique blue-green algae could be key to next anti-cancer drug

Could a slippery glob of algae hold the key to the next anti-cancer drug? According to new research into a compound produced by a unique community of blue-green algae, the answer could be yes. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement