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Glutamine is an amino acid used in nutrition therapy. It is also being studied for the treatment of diarrhea caused by radiation therapy to the pelvis.
New research could help reverse side effects of acetaminophen overdose

New research could help reverse side effects of acetaminophen overdose

New research could help reverse deadly side effects caused by excessive doses of the drug acetaminophen, the major ingredient in Tylenol and many other over-the-counter and prescription medicines. [More]
Ruhr-Universität Bochum scientists develop mouse model to investigate SCA6

Ruhr-Universität Bochum scientists develop mouse model to investigate SCA6

Scientists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum established a mouse model for the human disease SCA6. SCA6 is characterised by movement deficits and caused by similar genetic alterations as Chorea Huntington. The mouse model will be used to investigate the disease mechanisms. [More]
Study examines effects of intravenous glutamine on hind limb ischemia reperfusion injury

Study examines effects of intravenous glutamine on hind limb ischemia reperfusion injury

A single dose of intravenous glutamine (GLN) administered immediately after a non-lethal lower limb ischemia reduces the reperfusion inflammatory reaction locally and systemically according to a new study. [More]
Researchers submit patent application for drug that could destroy acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Researchers submit patent application for drug that could destroy acute lymphoblastic leukemia

A patent application for a drug that could destroy the deadly childhood disease known as acute lymphoblastic leukemia — and potentially other cancers as well — has been submitted by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, the University of Maryland and the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. [More]
Allele-specific lncRNA regulates cancer metabolism

Allele-specific lncRNA regulates cancer metabolism

Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) are unusual in that they don't encode proteins like normal RNA. Yet they do play a role in regulating cellular functions and interest cancer researchers. [More]
Study: Broken communication in brain regions appears to worsen Huntington's disease

Study: Broken communication in brain regions appears to worsen Huntington's disease

Indiana University researchers have found that broken communication in a specific part of the brain plays a role in the involuntary physical movements that affect individuals with Huntington's disease. [More]
Researchers discover new metabolic mechanisms linked to macrophage polarization

Researchers discover new metabolic mechanisms linked to macrophage polarization

A group of researchers from Washington University in St. Louis, Agios Pharmaceuticals and ITMO University has discovered new metabolic mechanisms that regulate macrophage polarization - the unique ability of these immune cells to change their specialization depending on the required task. [More]
Metabolic derangement may facilitate cell proliferation in PAH

Metabolic derangement may facilitate cell proliferation in PAH

An enzyme that facilitates modification of proteins via a glucose metabolism pathway may promote cell proliferation in the lung tissue of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, say researchers. [More]
BeiGene chooses SAFC's CHOZN Platform to support oncology drug development

BeiGene chooses SAFC's CHOZN Platform to support oncology drug development

Sigma-Aldrich Corporation today announced that SAFC Commercial, its custom manufacturing services business unit, has entered a commercial sales and service contract with leading biopharmaceutical company, BeiGene. [More]
Xylem’s YSI biochemistry analyzer is effective tool for cell culture and cancer research

Xylem’s YSI biochemistry analyzer is effective tool for cell culture and cancer research

Specifically for oncology drug development applications, the YSI 2950 biochemistry analyzer is used to measure analytes such as glucose, glutamine, glutamate, lactate, providing a simple, automated analysis of bioprocess cell culture samples, with accurate results in less than a minute. [More]
Sanford-Burnham researchers discover control mechanism for glutamine uptake in breast cancer cells

Sanford-Burnham researchers discover control mechanism for glutamine uptake in breast cancer cells

Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute have discovered a mechanism that explains why some breast cancer tumors respond to specific chemotherapies and others do not. The findings highlight the level of glutamine, an essential nutrient for cancer development, as a determinant of breast cancer response to select anticancer therapies, and identify a marker associated with glutamine uptake, for potential prognosis and stratification of breast cancer therapy. [More]
New study may lead to novel drug target for treating lung cancer

New study may lead to novel drug target for treating lung cancer

A new study by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers suggests that targeting a key enzyme and its associated metabolic programming may lead to novel drug development to treat lung cancer. [More]
UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

UAB Research Probes Molecular Basis Of Rare Genetic Disorder

An international group co-led by University of Alabama at Birmingham researcher Mary MacDougall, Ph.D., has unraveled the molecular basis for the rare, inherited genetic disorder, Singleton-Merten Syndrome (SMS). Individuals with SMS develop extreme, life-threatening calcification of the aorta and heart valves, early-onset periodontitis and root resorption of the teeth, decreases in bone density, and loss of bone tissue at the tips of fingers and toes. [More]
Emerging strategies to boost healthy RBCs may reduce burden of anemia linked to blood disorders

Emerging strategies to boost healthy RBCs may reduce burden of anemia linked to blood disorders

Emerging treatment approaches may reduce the burden of anemia associated with blood disorders by enhancing production of healthy red blood cells, according to data presented today at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]
Scientists apply iPS cell technology to Huntington's disease transgenic monkey model

Scientists apply iPS cell technology to Huntington's disease transgenic monkey model

Creating induced pluripotent stem cells or iPS cells allows researchers to establish "disease in a dish" models of conditions ranging from Alzheimer's disease to diabetes. [More]
Research sheds light on role of hepatic mTORC1 in whole body physiology

Research sheds light on role of hepatic mTORC1 in whole body physiology

The protein mTOR is a central controller of growth and metabolism. Deregulation of mTOR signaling increases the risk of developing metabolic diseases such as diabetes, obesity and cancer. [More]
Receipt of nutrition via feeding tube may be harmful for ICU patients

Receipt of nutrition via feeding tube may be harmful for ICU patients

Among mechanically ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients, receipt of high-protein nutrition via a feeding tube enriched with immune-modulating nutrients (such as glutamine, omega-3 fatty acids, and antioxidants) vs standard high-protein nutrition did not result in a significant difference in the incidence of new complications and may be harmful, as suggested by an increased risk of death at 6 months, according to a study in the August 6 issue of JAMA. [More]
Research reveals structural differences of protein involved in Huntington's disease

Research reveals structural differences of protein involved in Huntington's disease

Neutron scattering research at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has revealed clear structural differences in the normal and pathological forms of a protein involved in Huntington's disease. [More]
Androgen sensitivity may contribute to hypertrichosis in girls

Androgen sensitivity may contribute to hypertrichosis in girls

Prepubertal girls with hypertrichosis are likely to have genetic variants of the androgen receptor known to be particularly sensitive to androgen, say researchers. [More]
New research shows how misfolded proteins are precisely selected for degradation

New research shows how misfolded proteins are precisely selected for degradation

It's almost axiomatic that misfolded proteins compromise how cells normally function and cause debilitating human disease, but how these proteins are detected and degraded within the body is not well understood. [More]
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