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Harvard Medical School scientists reveal structure of vesicular stomatitis virus protein

Harvard Medical School scientists reveal structure of vesicular stomatitis virus protein

Viruses need us. In order to multiply, viruses have to invade a host cell and copy their genetic information. To do so, viruses encode their own replication machinery or components that subvert the host replication machinery to their advantage. [More]
Scientists to discuss the possibility of predicting evolution at scientific conference in Portugal

Scientists to discuss the possibility of predicting evolution at scientific conference in Portugal

Is it possible to predict the evolution of the influenza virus? Or how rapidly bacteria evolve resistance to antibiotics? Or even how cancer cells spread inside a human being? These are some of the main topics of discussion that bring together renowned scientists from all over the world at the scientific conference "Forecasting evolution?" held at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation (FCG; Portugal) from 8th to 11th July. [More]
New article highlights learnings gleaned from monitoring complex HIV clinical trials in Africa

New article highlights learnings gleaned from monitoring complex HIV clinical trials in Africa

A new article in Clinical Investigation highlights the learnings gleaned from monitoring several complex HIV clinical trials in Africa over a 15 year period. [More]
HIV capsid protein plays crucial role in the virus' life cycle

HIV capsid protein plays crucial role in the virus' life cycle

HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, is the retrovirus that leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or AIDS. Globally, about 35 million people are living with HIV, which constantly adapts and mutates creating challenges for researchers. Now, scientists at the University of Missouri are gaining a clearer idea of what a key protein in HIV looks like, which will help explain its vital role in the virus' life cycle. [More]
Express Scripts report shows that new exchange plan enrollees spent less on medications in Q1 2015

Express Scripts report shows that new exchange plan enrollees spent less on medications in Q1 2015

New exchange plan enrollees spent less on medications in the first quarter of 2015 compared to the same time a year ago, according to the third edition of the Express Scripts Exchange Pulse report, released today. [More]

Increased years of secondary schooling reduce risk of HIV infection, shows study

Longer secondary schooling substantially reduces the risk of contracting HIV, particularly for girls, according to new research from Botswana published in The Lancet Global Health journal. [More]
UC San Diego epidemiologist receives $1.5 million grant for research on HIV, substance abuse

UC San Diego epidemiologist receives $1.5 million grant for research on HIV, substance abuse

Dan Werb, PhD, an internationally noted epidemiologist at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has been named one of four inaugural recipients of the Avenir Award, a prestigious $1.5 million research grant from the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). [More]
Researchers complete participants’ enrollment in Phase III trial of vaginal ring for HIV prevention

Researchers complete participants’ enrollment in Phase III trial of vaginal ring for HIV prevention

In a first for HIV prevention, an international team of researchers have completed follow-up of participants enrolled in a pivotal Phase III trial that tested the safety and effectiveness of a vaginal ring for preventing HIV in women. [More]
New study examines how reasons for illicit marijuana use relate to use of other drugs

New study examines how reasons for illicit marijuana use relate to use of other drugs

Marijuana is the most prevalent drug in the U.S. Approximately 70% of the 2.8 million individuals who initiated use of illicit drugs in 2013 reported that marijuana was their first drug. [More]
SLU's Center for Vaccine Development receives $2.9 million to study new vaccine to combat TB

SLU's Center for Vaccine Development receives $2.9 million to study new vaccine to combat TB

Saint Louis University's Center for Vaccine Development has received a $2.9 million award from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study a new tuberculosis vaccine. [More]
Exhausted army of immune cells may damage the very body they are supposed to protect

Exhausted army of immune cells may damage the very body they are supposed to protect

An 'exhausted' army of immune cells may not be able to fight off infection, but if its soldiers fight too hard they risk damaging the very body they are meant to be protecting, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. [More]
Specialized mental health treatment can benefit children from poor nations

Specialized mental health treatment can benefit children from poor nations

A specific type of talk therapy dispensed in the developing world to orphans and other vulnerable children who experienced trauma such as sexual and domestic abuse showed dramatic results, despite being administered by workers with little education, new research shows. [More]

Secretary of Health advises all Pennsylvanians to get tested for HIV

Secretary of Health Dr. Karen Murphy is reminding Pennsylvanians that June 27 is National HIV Testing Day and urges all Pennsylvanians to get tested for HIV as part of their routine health care. [More]
NIDA announces recipients of Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS, genetics or epigenetics research

NIDA announces recipients of Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS, genetics or epigenetics research

The National Institute on Drug Abuse today announced the first six recipients of its two newly developed Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS and genetics or epigenetics research. The Avenir (meaning "future" in French) Awards support early stage investigators who propose highly innovative studies. The six scientists will each receive up to $300,000 per year for five years to support their research. [More]
Caya contoured diaphragm to expand U.S. women's options for nonhormonal barrier contraception

Caya contoured diaphragm to expand U.S. women's options for nonhormonal barrier contraception

With the launch of the Caya contoured diaphragm this June, women in the United States will have access to a method of contraception that is nonhormonal, has few side effects, and can be used for up to two years. Last fall, the United States Food and Drug Administration cleared the single-size Caya contoured diaphragm for marketing in the US, and now the diaphragm is available by prescription from healthcare providers. [More]
Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research journal supports President Obama's statement on medical use of marijuana

Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research journal supports President Obama's statement on medical use of marijuana

Mary Ann Liebert, publisher of the newly launched peer-reviewed open access journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, strongly supports President Obama's statement that "...carefully prescribed medical use of marijuana may in fact be appropriate and we should follow the science as opposed to ideology on this issue," when asked about a pending Senate bill seeking to change federal law regarding state-legalized medical marijuana programs. [More]
Innovations in AIDS efforts should be leveraged to meet future global health challenges, says UNAIDS-Lancet Commission

Innovations in AIDS efforts should be leveraged to meet future global health challenges, says UNAIDS-Lancet Commission

Countries most affected by HIV must focus on stopping new HIV infections and expanding access to antiretroviral treatment or risk the epidemic rebounding, urges a major new report from the UNAIDS and Lancet Commission. [More]
Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss, combined with vitamin D supplements, reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. Chronic inflammation is known to contribute to the development and progression of several diseases, including some cancers. [More]
Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

Weight loss along with vitamin D supplementation reduces chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found that weight loss, in combination with vitamin D supplementation, has a greater effect on reducing chronic inflammation than weight loss alone. [More]
WHO prequalifies new male circumcision device to prevent HIV

WHO prequalifies new male circumcision device to prevent HIV

The ShangRing, a novel medical device for voluntary medical male circumcision, has received prequalification from the World Health Organization (WHO) for use. [More]
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