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Implementation science may help prevent mother-to-child HIV transmissions

Implementation science may help prevent mother-to-child HIV transmissions

An emerging field, known as implementation science, may help reduce the nearly 150,000 instances of mother-to-child HIV transmissions that occur annually around the world, mostly in developing countries. c [More]
Report highlights need to strengthen response to major public health threats

Report highlights need to strengthen response to major public health threats

In a report released today by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, an Independent Panel formed to review HHS's response to Ebola made several recommendations on how the nation's federal public health system should strengthen its response to major public health threats, both internationally and domestically. [More]
Experts compile model list of essential diagnostic tests aiming to improve global health

Experts compile model list of essential diagnostic tests aiming to improve global health

In a western doctor's office or hospital, patients don't think twice about giving a blood or urine sample that can tell if they have a disease or infection, or show if their medicines are working. The samples get rushed to a testing lab with modern equipment that's held to high quality standards. [More]
New IDSA guidelines focus on diagnosis, treatment of deadly aspergillosis

New IDSA guidelines focus on diagnosis, treatment of deadly aspergillosis

New therapies are improving care, but early diagnosis remains critical in the effective treatment of invasive, a potentially deadly fungal infection, according to new guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new strategy to design potential HIV vaccine candidates

TSRI scientists develop new strategy to design potential HIV vaccine candidates

Want to catch a criminal? Show a mugshot on the news. Want to stop HIV infections? Get the immune system to recognize and attack the virus's tell-tale structure. That's part of the basic approach behind efforts at The Scripps Research Institute to design an AIDS vaccine. [More]
Experts receive NIH grant to study why some HIV-infected individuals resist TB

Experts receive NIH grant to study why some HIV-infected individuals resist TB

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine experts and colleagues in the United States and Africa have received an $11 million, five-year NIH grant to understand why some people living with HIV in Africa avoid becoming infected with the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB) despite exposure to high-TB-risk circumstances. [More]
Tiny doses of anti-HIV drug may be effective for treating Alzheimer's disease

Tiny doses of anti-HIV drug may be effective for treating Alzheimer's disease

For a promising pathway to treating Alzheimer's patients, "aim here." That's what National Institute of Standards of Technology researchers advised collaborators hunting for molecules that, by linking to a normally occurring enzyme, rev up the brain's capacity for clearing cholesterol--a boost associated with improvements in memory and other benefits in animal studies. [More]
Strengthening immune defence system may provide treatment alternative for tuberculosis

Strengthening immune defence system may provide treatment alternative for tuberculosis

Researchers at Linköping University have made a discovery that could contribute to developing new vaccines and treatment alternatives for tuberculosis in the future. The results have been published in Scientific Reports, a sister journal to the highly respected periodical Nature. [More]
Media-awareness campaign aims to reduce binge drinking among ethnic-minority emerging adults

Media-awareness campaign aims to reduce binge drinking among ethnic-minority emerging adults

Health-promotion and disease-prevention efforts can no longer use a one-size-fits-all approach. Efforts targeting emerging adult populations - encompassing late adolescence and early adulthood - must embrace and utilize multi-pronged, multi-media approaches in order to be successful. [More]
NIH funds novel substance abuse treatment program that targets marginalized populations

NIH funds novel substance abuse treatment program that targets marginalized populations

The creators of a novel substance abuse treatment program have received an infusion of funding from a federal agency for an expanded study of their intervention, which targets marginalized populations who struggle with problems such as racism, sexism, poverty and histories of incarceration. [More]
Latest comprehensive survey reveals top health concerns for South Siders

Latest comprehensive survey reveals top health concerns for South Siders

Residents on the South Side say cancer, violence prevention and sexually transmitted infections are among their top health concerns, according to the latest comprehensive assessment conducted by the University of Chicago Medicine. [More]
Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Nonmedical use of prescription opioids more than doubled among adults in the United States from 2001-2002 to 2012-2013, based on a study from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health. Nearly 10 million Americans, or 4.1 percent of the adult population, used opioid medications in 2012-2013 a class of drugs that includes OxyContin and Vicodin, without a prescription or not as prescribed (in greater amounts, more often, or longer than prescribed) in the past year. [More]
Studies reveal how parents can help develop smart, social kids

Studies reveal how parents can help develop smart, social kids

A pair of new studies further strengthen scientific understanding of the links between what a child experiences in the first years of life and later childhood behaviour and abilities. [More]
First CRISPR/Cas9 screen helps identify human proteins required for Zika virus replication

First CRISPR/Cas9 screen helps identify human proteins required for Zika virus replication

Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have performed the first CRISPR/Cas9 screen to discover human proteins that Zika virus needs for replication. [More]
New study sheds light on sexual health of gay and bisexual men

New study sheds light on sexual health of gay and bisexual men

More gay and bisexual men than ever are getting tested for HIV, according to new data from the National Gay Men's Sex Survey. The survey is the largest of its kind in the UK and sheds light on the sexual health of men who have sex with men. [More]
Patient navigators could help improve comprehensive cancer screening rates among low-income, ethnic minorities

Patient navigators could help improve comprehensive cancer screening rates among low-income, ethnic minorities

A clinical trial conducted by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found that the use of patient navigators - individuals who assist patients in receiving health care services - may improve comprehensive cancer screening rates among patient populations not likely to receive recommended screenings. [More]
New blood test could help predict severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension

New blood test could help predict severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that rising blood levels of a protein called hematoma derived growth factor (HDGF) are linked to the increasing severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a form of damaging high blood pressure in the lungs. [More]
Study emphasizes need for Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program to receive basic HIV care

Study emphasizes need for Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program to receive basic HIV care

A Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine study of insurance coverage of more than 28,000 people with HIV concludes that a decades-old program that offers free medical care remains a critical necessity despite the availability of coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). [More]
Failure to recognise gender diversity causes major gaps in understanding transgender health

Failure to recognise gender diversity causes major gaps in understanding transgender health

2015 was an unprecedented year in the recognition of transgender rights in some high-income countries. However, as a new Series published in The Lancet today reveals, public recognition has yet to translate to a concerted effort to support and improve the health of transgender people across the world. [More]
Researchers highlight gene loss as potential process of genetic change, evolutionary adaption

Researchers highlight gene loss as potential process of genetic change, evolutionary adaption

"Loss is nothing else but change and change is nature's delight" says the quote by the philosopher and emperor Marcus Aurelius, which opens the scientific article that analyses the gene loss phenomenon and its impact on the evolution of living beings. [More]
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