HIV News and Research RSS Feed - HIV News and Research

Valley fever diagnosis often overlooked by primary care physicians

Valley fever diagnosis often overlooked by primary care physicians

For patients with pneumonia or ongoing influenza-like symptoms who live in or have visited the west or southwest United States, especially Arizona and central California, infectious diseases experts recommend physicians suspect valley fever, an often-overlooked fungal infection. [More]
Maternal HIV infection could alter gut microbiome of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants

Maternal HIV infection could alter gut microbiome of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants

A study led by researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles suggests that maternal HIV infection influences the microbiome of their HIV-uninfected infants. [More]
New screen-and-treat programme for hepatitis B may thwart deadly complications of disease

New screen-and-treat programme for hepatitis B may thwart deadly complications of disease

Research into Africa's first 'screen-and-treat' programme for hepatitis B suggests the initiative may reduce deadly complications of the virus. [More]
Community-based lifestyle programs can also improve health-related quality of life

Community-based lifestyle programs can also improve health-related quality of life

The value of a healthy lifestyle isn't reflected only in the numbers on the scale or the blood pressure cuff. [More]
First confirmed case of Alzheimer’s disease in HIV-positive patient to be presented at AAIC 2016

First confirmed case of Alzheimer’s disease in HIV-positive patient to be presented at AAIC 2016

The first case of Alzheimer's disease diagnosed in an HIV-positive individual will be presented in a poster session at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2016 in Toronto July 27. [More]
Better understanding of HIV latency could be key to eradicating virus, say researchers

Better understanding of HIV latency could be key to eradicating virus, say researchers

A better understanding of HIV latency is the key to eradicating the virus researchers at the University of North Carolina and partner institutions write in a perspective in the journal Science. [More]
Penn researchers construct model to examine how immune system may evolve to conquer HIV

Penn researchers construct model to examine how immune system may evolve to conquer HIV

It has remained frustratingly difficult to develop a vaccine for HIV/AIDS, in part because the virus, once in our bodies, rapidly reproduces and evolves to escape being killed by the immune system. [More]
New study reports strains of chimpanzee-carried SIVs can infect human cells

New study reports strains of chimpanzee-carried SIVs can infect human cells

No one knows exactly how it happened. It may have entered through a cut or bite wound, the blood of a chimpanzee seeping into an exposed fingertip or forearm or foot. [More]
Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

To support a coordinated, innovative approach to the development of an AIDS vaccine, Texas Biomedical Research Institute scientists, together with a multi-institutional coalition of experts from the United States and Europe, have received a grant for $23 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Combining ART with immune-enhancing treatment may destabilize HIV reservoirs

Combining ART with immune-enhancing treatment may destabilize HIV reservoirs

Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) can reduce the amount of HIV in the blood to an undetectable level in most chronically infected people, it cannot eliminate reservoirs of HIV that persist in latently infected immune cells. [More]
Neutrons key to discovering new HIV drugs? An interview with Dr Matthew Blakeley

Neutrons key to discovering new HIV drugs? An interview with Dr Matthew Blakeley

Neutron crystallography allows us to determine the three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules, such as proteins, by means of the diffraction of neutrons from the regularly spaced atoms of a crystal. [More]
Improving efficiency of health facilities could extend ART to many people living with HIV

Improving efficiency of health facilities could extend ART to many people living with HIV

Health facilities in Kenya, Uganda, and Zambia could extend life-sustaining antiretroviral therapy (ART) to hundreds of thousands of people living with HIV if facilities improved the efficiency of service delivery. [More]
Study provides new insights into real-world use of PrEP

Study provides new insights into real-world use of PrEP

Several studies presented today in an official press conference at the 21st International AIDS Conference in Durban provided new insights on the use of PrEP among a broad range of populations. [More]
WHO urges countries to take rapid action to reduce new infections, deaths from viral hepatitis

WHO urges countries to take rapid action to reduce new infections, deaths from viral hepatitis

Ahead of World Hepatitis Day, 28 July 2016, WHO is urging countries to take rapid action to improve knowledge about the disease, and to increase access to testing and treatment services. [More]
JAIDS presents important information to prevent HIV epidemic among transgender individuals

JAIDS presents important information to prevent HIV epidemic among transgender individuals

Programs to reduce the high risk of HIV infection among transgender people are urgently needed—but efforts are hindered by a lack of accurate information on HIV prevalence, HIV incidence, and specific risk factors facing this key population. [More]
Study confirms efficacy of PrEP in reducing risk of HIV infection in men who have sex with men

Study confirms efficacy of PrEP in reducing risk of HIV infection in men who have sex with men

The last phase of ANRS IPERGAY has confirmed that "on-demand" pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a highly effective method of reducing the risk of HIV infection in men who have sex with men and who report high-risk behavior. [More]
New HIV infections stagnating globally at 2.5 million per year, study reveals

New HIV infections stagnating globally at 2.5 million per year, study reveals

A major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 study, published today in The Lancet HIV journal, reveals that although deaths from HIV/AIDS have been steadily declining from a peak in 2005, 2.5 million people worldwide became newly infected with HIV in 2015, a number that hasn't changed substantially in the past 10 years. [More]
Increasing rates of new HIV infections threaten 74 countries

Increasing rates of new HIV infections threaten 74 countries

AIDS deaths are falling in most countries worldwide, but the rate of new infections increased in several countries over the past decade, threatening to undermine efforts to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030, a new scientific paper shows. [More]
ART could help reduce opportunistic infections and save lives of HIV-infected children

ART could help reduce opportunistic infections and save lives of HIV-infected children

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 150,000 children with HIV under 15 years of age died of opportunistic infections in low-to-middle income countries in 2014 alone. [More]

Anti-HIV medications provide durable protection against heterosexual transmission, study finds

Anti-HIV medications suppress the viral load of people living with HIV and provide durable protection against heterosexual transmission a study led by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found. [More]
Advertisement