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Particular brand of helmet affects athlete's risk of suffering from sport-related concussion

Particular brand of helmet affects athlete's risk of suffering from sport-related concussion

Alison Brooks, MD, MPH, a sports medicine physician and faculty member at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, will present, "Incidence of Sport-Related Concussion in High School Football Players: Effect of Helmets, Mouthguards, Previous Concussions, Years Playing Experience" last week at the 23rd Annual Meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) at the Hyatt Regency in New Orleans, La. [More]

Research: Child's relationships may be hidden casualty long after head injury

New research has found that a child's relationships may be a hidden casualty long after a head injury. Neuroscientists at Brigham Young University studied a group of children three years after each had suffered a traumatic brain injury - most commonly from car accidents. The researchers found that lingering injury in a specific region of the brain predicted the health of the children's social lives. [More]

Western University researchers study causes of childhood concussions in rural and urban areas

Researchers at Western University (London, Canada) have found youth living in rural areas are more likely to sustain concussions from injuries involving motorized vehicles such as all-terrain vehicles and dirt bikes, whereas youth living in urban areas suffer concussions mostly as a result of sports. [More]

High BP medications may increase risk of falls and fall injuries in older patients

Medication to treat high blood pressure (BP) in older patients appears to be associated with an increased risk for serious injury from falling such as a hip fracture or head injury, especially in older patients who have been injured in previous falls. [More]

Dreams and delusions are associated with faulty "reality testing", shows research

New research from the University of Adelaide has delved into the reasons why some people are unable to break free of their delusions, despite overwhelming evidence explaining the delusion isn't real. [More]
Scientists measure how well football helmet designs protected against traumatic brain injury

Scientists measure how well football helmet designs protected against traumatic brain injury

A new study finds that football helmets currently used on the field may do little to protect against hits to the side of the head, or rotational force, an often dangerous source of brain injury and encephalopathy. [More]
Neuroscientists identify white matter "scaffold" of human brain

Neuroscientists identify white matter "scaffold" of human brain

For the first time, neuroscientists have systematically identified the white matter "scaffold" of the human brain, the critical communications network that supports brain function. [More]
Concussions account for 5.8% to 8.6% of injuries in soccer games

Concussions account for 5.8% to 8.6% of injuries in soccer games

Soccer is the most-popular and fastest-growing sport in the world and, like many contact sports, players are at risk of suffering concussions from collisions on the field. [More]
Collaboration between NFL and GE seeks to improve safety of athletes, soldiers who sustain mild TBI

Collaboration between NFL and GE seeks to improve safety of athletes, soldiers who sustain mild TBI

​When the Broncos and the Seahawks meet on the gridiron for Superbowl XLVIII, player and team statistics - passer ratings, rushing yards, sacks and fumbles - will be tossed around like, well, a football. [More]
BrainScope receives award from GE and NFL to enhance portable concussion assessment system

BrainScope receives award from GE and NFL to enhance portable concussion assessment system

BrainScope Company, Inc. today announced that it has received an award from GE and the National Football League to further enhance its portable concussion assessment system by combining imaging biomarkers with its brainwave technology. [More]
Head injuries increase risk for psychiatric disorders

Head injuries increase risk for psychiatric disorders

A Danish study of a large cohort of individuals who presented at hospital with head injuries has found that they were at increased risk for later developing schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and organic mental disorders. [More]

Physician offers tips for parents to keep children safe, healthy in winter

When it snows, most children have fun by engaging in snowball fights, sledding, building snowmen, and making snow angels. However, it is important for parents to prepare their children for the cold weather. Outside activities are wonderful as long as appropriate safety precautions are taken. [More]

Concussive brain injuries can lead to depressive behaviors later in life

A head injury can lead immune-system brain cells to go on "high alert" and overreact to later immune challenges by becoming excessively inflammatory - a condition linked with depressive complications, a new animal study suggests. [More]

Children with epilepsy at higher risk for mood and behavior disorders

Children with epilepsy are at high risk for depression, anxiety, and behavioral functioning disorders. Mood and behavior are known to change or improve in children following epilepsy surgery, but research is inconsistent concerning the extent of the change. [More]

Study shows VEEG telemetry monitoring with early cessation of AED therapy is safe, effective

Patients with epilepsy often undergo evaluation by concurrent video and EEG monitoring (vEEG) for therapeutic planning, including possible epilepsy surgery. Seizures during monitoring increase the diagnostic yield and requires the withdrawal of anticonvulsant drugs (AEDs) to allow seizures to occur. [More]

Prolonged febrile seizures can affect pediatric patients

A long-standing hypothesis holds that prolonged febrile (fever induced) seizures, the most common form of childhood convulsive status epilepticus, cause mesial temporal sclerosis. CSE is a single seizure, or two or more seizures between which consciousness is not regained, lasting for more than 30 minutes. [More]

Management of refractory convulsive status epilepticus varies at different medical centers

The management of refractory convulsive status epilepticus varies at different medical centers and from patient to patient. Rapid success in aborting these non-stop seizures is crucial as the risk of neurological damage is high and, though rare, may result in death depending on seizure duration. By pooling data and analyzing current RCSE management practices, researchers representing a multicenter network of tertiary referral hospitals in the U.S. conducted a study that could lead to improved treatment outcomes for potentially life-threatening seizures. [More]

Scientists identify important new genes for epilepsy

Scientists screening the DNA of large cohorts for known and suspected epilepsy associated genes are finding that, while some genes are implicated in discrete phenotypes or forms of epilepsy, other genes are implicated in a wider range of phenotypes. Although ion channel genes are a common cause of epilepsy, the researchers also report a significant number of epilepsy patients with mutations in non-ion channel genes. The studies have important implications for treatment, prognosis and risk counseling. [More]
Underlying loss of awareness during partial seizures is same as deep sleep

Underlying loss of awareness during partial seizures is same as deep sleep

Epilepsy patients with complex partial seizures have impaired consciousness during seizure episodes and typically have no memory of the event. However, the mechanisms of seizure unconsciousness are unclear. [More]
NIH scientists film early concussion damage and describe brain's response to injury

NIH scientists film early concussion damage and describe brain's response to injury

There is more than meets the eye following even a mild traumatic brain injury. While the brain may appear to be intact, new findings reported in Nature suggest that the brain's protective coverings may feel the brunt of the impact. [More]