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Temple team describes use of cadaver DNA to advance genetics learning in medical curriculum

Temple team describes use of cadaver DNA to advance genetics learning in medical curriculum

Cadavers have long been one of the most important resources for anatomy teaching in medical school. Now, they are also at the forefront of cutting-edge genetics teaching, thanks to innovative thinking by professors at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University. [More]
Low-income families having children with special health care needs at high risk for food insecurity

Low-income families having children with special health care needs at high risk for food insecurity

Low-income families with children who have special health care needs are at high risk for food insecurity, even when they receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and participate in public assistance programs, such as Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers discover new bacterial species that triggers Lyme disease in people

Mayo Clinic researchers discover new bacterial species that triggers Lyme disease in people

Mayo Clinic researchers, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and health officials from Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin, have discovered a new bacterial species that causes Lyme disease in people. The new species has been provisionally named Borrelia mayonii. Prior to this finding, the only species believed to cause Lyme disease in North America was Borrelia burgdorferi. [More]
Alternatives exist to eliminate nonmedical exemptions for childhood vaccination

Alternatives exist to eliminate nonmedical exemptions for childhood vaccination

For more than 30 years, Mississippi and West Virginia were the only states in the country that disallowed nonmedical exemptions to mandatory school vaccination laws for religious or philosophical reasons, until they were joined by California last year. These exemption laws have provoked debate over the rights of parents versus the responsibility of government to protect public health. [More]
Elsevier releases new book on India's health care reforms

Elsevier releases new book on India's health care reforms

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, recently announced the launch of Health Care Reforms in India: Making Up for the Lost Decade, an authoritative and incisive look at India's healthcare system from the perspective of Rajendra Pratap Gupta, an expert healthcare observer as well as an influential and respected voice on public policy, innovation and the economy. [More]
Cold viruses at school largely to blame for asthma hospitalizations

Cold viruses at school largely to blame for asthma hospitalizations

The most dangerous times of year for children with asthma are soon after their schools reopen after a break, and a new study finds that cold viruses are largely to blame. [More]

New reports discuss future demands facing VA health services

Three reports that discuss the future demands facing the VA Health Care System, the current resources in the system and how care is provided to veterans outside the federal system have been released by the RAND Corporation. [More]
Researchers seek to better understand sequence of events that leads people to develop MS

Researchers seek to better understand sequence of events that leads people to develop MS

A team of investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has launched a study of individuals at risk for multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
2020 dementia challenge to be tackled by MOOC

2020 dementia challenge to be tackled by MOOC

The University of Derby’s Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) titled ‘Bridging the Dementia Divide’ is back by popular demand after the University received high levels of requests to run the course again. [More]
Effective treatments for knee instability may help reduce falls in older adults

Effective treatments for knee instability may help reduce falls in older adults

Symptoms of knee instability in older adults may indicate an increased risk of falling and of experiencing the various physical and psychological effects that can result from falling, according to a study published in Arthritis Care & Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology. [More]

Companies with healthy workforces have competitive edge in stock market

A new study finds companies with healthy workforces appear to have a competitive edge in the stock market. The study compared the stock market performance of ten of the healthiest companies in South Africa to the market at large. Nine different investment scenarios were tested and, in all nine scenarios, the healthy companies outperformed the Johannesburg Stock Exchange All Share Index. [More]
Loyola offers multidisciplinary digestive health program

Loyola offers multidisciplinary digestive health program

Loyola University Health System now offers a multidisciplinary digestive health program to treat digestive tract and related medical conditions. Bipan Chand, MD, FACS, FASGE, FASMBS, and Neil Gupta, MD, MPH, are co-directors of the new program. [More]
New method could help physicians detect infection in wounds in less than a minute

New method could help physicians detect infection in wounds in less than a minute

A new method for detection of infection in wounds could take physicians less than a minute to complete, rather than the current 24 hours it takes to plate bacteria and leave it to incubate overnight, according to research by the George Washington University's Victoria Shanmugam, M.D. [More]
ADHD increases risk of becoming obese

ADHD increases risk of becoming obese

With the incidence of obesity increasing steadily, much research has been undertaken to try and identify those people who are most likely to become obese so measures can be taken to avoid excessive weight gain, since it is easier to prevent than to reverse. [More]
Study estimates prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across U.S. using SAE method

Study estimates prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across U.S. using SAE method

The International and American Associations for Dental Research have published an article titled "Predicting Periodontitis at State and Local Levels in the United States" in the OnlineFirst portion of the Journal of Dental Research. In it, authors P.I. Eke, X. Zhang, H. Lu, L. Wei, G. Thornton-Evans, K.J. Greenlund, J.B. Holt and J.B. Croft estimate the prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across the United States by using a novel, small area estimation (SAE) method. [More]
Better quality of care may reduce mortality risk in patients treated with opioid therapy for pain

Better quality of care may reduce mortality risk in patients treated with opioid therapy for pain

Better quality of care may reduce the risk of death for patients who are prescribed opioid painkillers for chronic pain, say Yale researchers. Their study, published Feb. 4 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, offers evidence that supports recommendations from clinical practice guidelines encouraging physicians to engage patients with mental health services and substance abuse treatment, as well as to avoid co-prescriptions for sedatives. [More]
Study shows gambling among young teens associated with risk-taking behavior

Study shows gambling among young teens associated with risk-taking behavior

Gambling among young teens may be associated with increased use of alcohol, cigarettes, or marijuana according to a study that surveyed sixth- to eighth-graders in Italian schools. The research is reported in the February issue of the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. [More]
Lamin nucleoskeleton disordered in Alzheimer's

Lamin nucleoskeleton disordered in Alzheimer's

Brain cell death in Alzheimer's disease is linked to disruption of a skeleton that surrounds the nucleus of the cells, a researcher in the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio said. [More]
New AGS guidance aims to transform approaches to healthcare for older patients

New AGS guidance aims to transform approaches to healthcare for older patients

New guidance from the American Geriatrics Society aims to transform approaches to healthcare for our increasingly diverse older population. Developed by a committee of experts in ethnogeriatrics (the study of how ethnicity and culture impact the health and well-being of older people), "Achieving High-Quality Multicultural Geriatric Care" outlines present health disparities and the need for sensitivity to culture and health literacy when working with older individuals. [More]
Using BMI to measure health incorrectly labels over 54 million Americans as 'unhealthy', study finds

Using BMI to measure health incorrectly labels over 54 million Americans as 'unhealthy', study finds

Over the past few years, body mass index, a ratio of a person's height and weight, has effectively become a proxy for whether a person is considered healthy. Many U.S. companies use their employees' BMIs as a factor in determining workers' health care costs. And people with higher BMIs could soon have to pay higher health insurance premiums, if a rule proposed in April by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is adopted. [More]
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