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Impact of IBS on patients

Impact of IBS on patients

The report reveals a quite alarming situation about the economic impact of IBS on healthcare system, society and patients themselves. In particular, it disclosed that there are a lot of hidden costs related to the utilization of healthcare resources by means of patients, frequently not recognized as IBS... [More]
New pocket guide offers detailed guidance on treating older adults with mental health issues

New pocket guide offers detailed guidance on treating older adults with mental health issues

Nearly 20 percent of older Americans experience depression and the highest rate of suicide is among older adult Caucasian males. [More]
Older adults with chronic illnesses, depression more likely to be problem drinkers, study shows

Older adults with chronic illnesses, depression more likely to be problem drinkers, study shows

Older adults suffering from multiple chronic health conditions and depression are nearly five times as likely to be problem drinkers as older adults with the same conditions and no depression, according to researchers at the University of Georgia. [More]
Technology and cost barriers hinder real-time reporting of cancer patients' symptoms

Technology and cost barriers hinder real-time reporting of cancer patients' symptoms

Capturing real-time reports of cancer patients' symptoms between doctor's visits has proven health benefits, but technology and cost barriers are getting in the way of widespread adoption of the practice, reports a University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher. [More]
Harvard scientists discuss promise and peril of emerging IVG technique

Harvard scientists discuss promise and peril of emerging IVG technique

In vitro fertilization has transformed reproductive medicine and sparked a number of therapeutic and diagnostic breakthroughs. [More]
New Vanderbilt Center offers comprehensive care for patients with Marfan syndrome and aortic disease

New Vanderbilt Center offers comprehensive care for patients with Marfan syndrome and aortic disease

With the recent opening of the Vanderbilt Marfan Syndrome and Aortic Disorders Center, the state's only comprehensive clinic serving entire families, hundreds of patients with connective tissue disorders now have a one-stop shop for health care. [More]
Researchers explore cause for increasing use of cannabis among older Americans

Researchers explore cause for increasing use of cannabis among older Americans

The U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has reported that cannabis use by persons over age 50 has outpaced recent growth observed across all other age groups. [More]
Repeat cesarean delivery may result in excess morbidity and cost, UAB review shows

Repeat cesarean delivery may result in excess morbidity and cost, UAB review shows

A systematic review from the University of Alabama at Birmingham shows that routinely opting for a repeat cesarean delivery over first attempting a vaginal delivery may result in excess morbidity and cost from a population perspective for women with a prior low transverse incision cesarean delivery who are likely to have a successful vaginal delivery. [More]
U.S. chain restaurants not improving nutritional quality of children's menus, study finds

U.S. chain restaurants not improving nutritional quality of children's menus, study finds

U.S. chain restaurants participating in a National Restaurant Association initiative to improve the nutritional quality of their children's menus have made no significant changes compared with restaurants not participating in the program, according to a new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. [More]
Risky opioid prescribing rates drop after new VA initiative, study finds

Risky opioid prescribing rates drop after new VA initiative, study finds

Fewer veterans received prescriptions for risky dosages of opioid painkillers after a national initiative took aim at reducing high doses and potentially dangerous drug combinations, a new study finds. [More]
Princeton University researchers find disparity in hospital admission rates for publicly insured children

Princeton University researchers find disparity in hospital admission rates for publicly insured children

Hospitals are less likely to admit children covered by public insurance such as Medicaid than privately insured children with similar symptoms, especially when hospitals beds are scarce. [More]
MGH researchers identify gene mutations linked to rare congenital condition involving lack of nose

MGH researchers identify gene mutations linked to rare congenital condition involving lack of nose

Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital led a large, international research team that has identified gene mutations associated with a rare congenital condition involving the absence of a nose and often accompanied by defects involving the eye and reproductive systems. [More]

Americans have shifted to self-directed programs for long-term care

The provision of long-term care in the U.S. has shifted from what was once a predominantly institutionally based system of care to one in which recipients can increasingly receive a range of both medical and supportive services at home and in the community, according to the latest edition of The Gerontological Society of America's Public Policy & Aging Report. [More]
Parents concerned about neighborhoods more likely to restrict children's outdoor play, study shows

Parents concerned about neighborhoods more likely to restrict children's outdoor play, study shows

A study conducted by LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health is the first to demonstrate that parents who are concerned about their neighborhoods restrict their children's outdoor play. [More]
PCT screening could be promising tool to help shorten hospital stays, reduce costs for sepsis patients

PCT screening could be promising tool to help shorten hospital stays, reduce costs for sepsis patients

Each year, over $20 billion dollars is spent on sepsis care, making it the most expensive condition managed in U.S. hospitals. [More]
NCCN publishes new easy-to-understand patient education resources focused on brain cancer

NCCN publishes new easy-to-understand patient education resources focused on brain cancer

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network has published the NCCN Guidelines for Patients and NCCN Quick Guide sheets for Brain Cancer - Gliomas—the first in a series of patient education resources focused on Brain Cancer. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers identify barriers to young men's sexual and reproductive health

Johns Hopkins researchers identify barriers to young men's sexual and reproductive health

Johns Hopkins researchers who conducted a dozen focus groups with 70 straight and gay/bisexual Hispanic and African-American males ages 15 to 24 report that gaining a better understanding of the context in which young men grow up will allow health care providers to improve this population's use of sexual and reproductive health care. [More]
HUB and Dutch health insurance companies to test use of organoid technology for CF treatment

HUB and Dutch health insurance companies to test use of organoid technology for CF treatment

Hubrecht Organoid Technology (HUB), and the health insurance companies CZ, Zilveren Kruis, and Menzis announced today that they will start a €3 million validation trial for use of HUB Organoid Technology to test if it can be used to determine the response of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients to new drug therapies. [More]
New study explores impact of Affordable Care Act on socioeconomic disparities in cancer screening

New study explores impact of Affordable Care Act on socioeconomic disparities in cancer screening

Out-of-pocket expenditures are thought to be a significant barrier to receiving cancer preventive services, especially for individuals of lower socioeconomic status. A new study looks at how the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which eliminated such out-of-pocket expenditures, has affected the use of mammography and colonoscopy. [More]
Perception can drive evolution of observable traits, study shows

Perception can drive evolution of observable traits, study shows

In an invited perspective published January 6, 2017, in Science, Hamilton Farris, PhD, Associate Professor-Research at LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence, finds that the key insight of an important study by Nachev, et al. is that perception can drive the evolution of observable traits. [More]
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