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Strengthening Native American families can help improve children’s health

Strengthening Native American families can help improve children’s health

Strengthening Native American families will help improve their children's health—that's the premise behind a research study targeting 3-, 4- and 5-year-olds and their caregivers on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. [More]
Women with alcoholic partners may benefit from Internet-based interactive support program

Women with alcoholic partners may benefit from Internet-based interactive support program

Women married to men with alcohol abuse problems can face a slew of problems themselves, with finding support for their situation near the top of the list. [More]
Screening tool can help identify nations' vulnerability to Ebola

Screening tool can help identify nations' vulnerability to Ebola

Public health experts can identify nations that are vulnerable to the occurrence and impact of future outbreaks of Ebola or other emergencies by using a screening tool that evaluates a nation's strengths across a wide range of measures such as political strength and health care capabilities, according to a new analysis from the RAND Corporation. [More]
New poll reveals U.S. public's perceptions of causes of health problems

New poll reveals U.S. public's perceptions of causes of health problems

A new NPR/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health poll finds that more than six in ten people living in the U.S. (62%) are concerned about their future health. Nearly four in ten (39%) said that they had one or more negative childhood experiences that they believe had a harmful impact on their adult health. [More]
Breakthrough treatment option for men with benign prostatic hyperplasia

Breakthrough treatment option for men with benign prostatic hyperplasia

Men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a condition in which the prostate is enlarged but not cancerous, have a new, breakthrough treatment option that is less invasive and has fewer complications than other minimally invasive treatments, such as transurethral resection of the prostate and surgical options, according to research presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology's Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]

Some health plans violate federal law requiring equal benefits for mental health care

One-quarter of the health plans being sold on health insurance exchanges set up through the Affordable Care Act offer benefits that appear to violate a federal law requiring equal benefits for general medical and mental health care, according to new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. [More]
Mayo Clinic study: Awareness of breast density varies among U.S. women

Mayo Clinic study: Awareness of breast density varies among U.S. women

Disparities in the level of awareness and knowledge of breast density exist among U.S. women, according to the results of a Mayo Clinic study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]
New model of care decreases likelihood of serious illness after discharge from ICU

New model of care decreases likelihood of serious illness after discharge from ICU

The Critical Care Recovery Center care model -- the nation's first collaborative care concept focusing on the extensive cognitive, physical and psychological recovery needs of intensive care unit survivors -- decreases the likelihood of serious illness after discharge from an ICU, according to a new study from the Regenstrief Institute and the Indiana University schools of medicine and nursing. [More]
Dengue fever circulating in urban areas of West Africa

Dengue fever circulating in urban areas of West Africa

Misdiagnosis of febrile illnesses as malaria is a continuing problem in Africa. A new study shows that in Ghana, dengue fever is circulating in urban areas and going undiagnosed. The authors of the study hope to use the findings to launch a widespread initiative to better understand acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses in West Africa. [More]
Study findings raise questions about additional value of cancer care in the U.S.

Study findings raise questions about additional value of cancer care in the U.S.

Despite sharp increases in spending on cancer treatment, cancer mortality rates in the United States have decreased only modestly since 1970, Samir Soneji, PhD of Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center and The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice has found. [More]
Experts review diagnostic approaches to treat obstructive coronary artery disease in women

Experts review diagnostic approaches to treat obstructive coronary artery disease in women

Obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in women often presents with different types of symptoms than in men and can be challenging to diagnose due to a variety of factors. A national panel of experts convened to review the latest evidence regarding CAD in women, diagnostic approaches, and new types of tests and technologies. [More]
Scientists sequence genome of hookworm

Scientists sequence genome of hookworm

In an advance that may potentially lead to new treatments for parasitic hookworms, scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and Cornell University have sequenced the genome of the hookworm, Ancylostoma ceylanicum. [More]
Anticholinergic medications associated with pneumonia risk in older people

Anticholinergic medications associated with pneumonia risk in older people

Taking commonly used medications with anticholinergic effects is associated with a significantly higher risk for developing pneumonia in a study of more than 3,000 older Group Health patients living in the community--not in nursing homes. [More]
Sutter Health hospitals among the nation's 100 Top Hospitals

Sutter Health hospitals among the nation's 100 Top Hospitals

Truven Health Analytics today named Sutter Health hospitals—Sutter Medical Center, Sacramento and Sutter Tracy Community Hospital—as two of the nation's 100 Top Hospitals. [More]
BioScrip’s total revenue increases $28.2 million to 2.5% in fourth quarter 2014

BioScrip’s total revenue increases $28.2 million to 2.5% in fourth quarter 2014

BioScrip®, Inc. today announced 2014 fourth quarter financial results. Fourth quarter revenue from continuing operations was $253.7 million and the net loss from continuing operations was $61.9 million, or $0.90 per basic and diluted share. [More]
Study shows heart valve repair can benefit patients with mitral regurgitation

Study shows heart valve repair can benefit patients with mitral regurgitation

Patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR) often suffer from psycho-emotional symptoms, such as depression and anxiety, but after undergoing mitral valve repair surgery patients experience a marked improvement in emotional and physical wellbeing, according to an article in the March 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Blood tests in heart surgery patients can lead to anemia, blood transfusions

Blood tests in heart surgery patients can lead to anemia, blood transfusions

Laboratory testing among patients undergoing cardiac surgery can lead to excessive bloodletting, which can increase the risk of developing hospital-acquired anemia and the need for blood transfusion, according to an article in the March 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Society of Interventional Radiology elevates 23 new Fellows during Annual Scientific Meeting in Atlanta

Society of Interventional Radiology elevates 23 new Fellows during Annual Scientific Meeting in Atlanta

The Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) elevated 23 new Fellows during the society's Annual Scientific Meeting, Feb. 28-March 5 in Atlanta. [More]
Pediatricians, health care providers encounter requests to postpone vaccinations

Pediatricians, health care providers encounter requests to postpone vaccinations

Pediatricians are facing increasing pressure from some parents who want to spread out the recommended vaccine schedule for their children by postponing vaccines, pointing to a need for improved programs that support timely vaccinations, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
New algorithm can gauge long-term death risk based on treadmill exercise performance

New algorithm can gauge long-term death risk based on treadmill exercise performance

Analyzing data from 58,000 heart stress tests, Johns Hopkins cardiologists report they have developed a formula that estimates one's risk of dying over a decade based on a person's ability to exercise on a treadmill at an increasing speed and incline. [More]