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WPA launches first ever global campaign to achieve fairness in mental healthcare

The World Psychiatric Association (WPA) is today launching the first ever 'World Mind Matters Day', a global campaign with the main goal of achieving fairness in mental healthcare for all. [More]
Journal of Medical Regulation publishes 2014 census of U.S. physician workforce

Journal of Medical Regulation publishes 2014 census of U.S. physician workforce

The Journal of Medical Regulation has published the "Census of Actively Licensed Physicians in the United States, 2014," which provides an analysis of the most recent physician licensure data collected from each of the state medical boards in the United States by the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB). [More]
Early antiviral treatment reduces disability risk, hospitalization time in older people

Early antiviral treatment reduces disability risk, hospitalization time in older people

Early treatment of flu-hospitalized people 65 and older with flu antiviral medications cuts the duration of their hospital stay and reduces their risk of needing extended care after discharge, a new CDC study finds. [More]
TXA drug reduces blood transfusion, saves costs

TXA drug reduces blood transfusion, saves costs

Using an inexpensive drug for every hip or knee replacement since 2013 has helped St. Michael's Hospital reduce its number of red blood cell transfusions performed during these surgeries by more than 40 per cent without negatively affecting patients, according to new research. [More]
Trajan launches prototype blood collection and storage device, hemaPEN

Trajan launches prototype blood collection and storage device, hemaPEN

In a world where health care costs are escalating and demands on health care systems are becoming overwhelming, Trajan Scientific and Medical (Trajan) today announces the innovation of hemaPEN, a prototype blood collection and storage device. [More]
Ex-prisoners with common psychiatric disorders more likely to commit violent crimes after release

Ex-prisoners with common psychiatric disorders more likely to commit violent crimes after release

Ex-prisoners with common psychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder (manic-depressive disorder) and alcohol and drug abuse are substantially more likely to commit a violent crime after release than other prisoners, according to new research published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. [More]
Study: High school athletes use smokeless tobacco at a higher rate compared to non-athletes

Study: High school athletes use smokeless tobacco at a higher rate compared to non-athletes

High school athletes who play on sports teams smoke tobacco products at a lower rate than non-athletes, but use smokeless tobacco at a higher rate, according to a study published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in today's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). [More]
More men with breast cancer are opting for double mastectomy

More men with breast cancer are opting for double mastectomy

The number of men with invasive cancer in one breast who undergo surgery to remove both breasts is on the rise, according to a new report published in JAMA Surgery. [More]
CVS Health’s data shows measurable reduction in cigarette purchases

CVS Health’s data shows measurable reduction in cigarette purchases

CVS Health today marked the first anniversary of ending tobacco sales at CVS/pharmacy by releasing new data showing a measurable reduction in cigarette purchases over the past year. [More]
Children in northern Israel emergency departments receive equal pain treatment, regardless of ethnicity

Children in northern Israel emergency departments receive equal pain treatment, regardless of ethnicity

Children with broken bones or joint dislocations in northern Israel emergency departments received equal pain treatment, regardless of their ethnicity or the ethnicity of the nurses who treated them, even during a period of armed conflict between the two ethnic groups. [More]
Double mastectomies on the rise in men with breast cancer, new report finds

Double mastectomies on the rise in men with breast cancer, new report finds

The number of men with breast cancer who undergo surgery to remove the unaffected breast has risen sharply, according to a new report by American Cancer Society and Dana Farber Cancer Institute researchers. The report, appearing in JAMA Surgery, is the first to identify the trend, which mirrors a trend seen in U.S. women over the past two decades. [More]
New study confirms continuing diet-related health disparity among Americans

New study confirms continuing diet-related health disparity among Americans

A study published Monday in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved concludes that ethnicity is associated with nutrient shortfalls of important nutrients. This study compared usual intake for essential nutrients between Non-Hispanic Black and Non-Hispanic White Americans using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2007-2010. [More]
Inhalation exposure to PM2.5 pollution triggers liver fibrosis

Inhalation exposure to PM2.5 pollution triggers liver fibrosis

A research team led by Kezhong Zhang, Ph.D., at the Wayne State University School of Medicine's Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, has discovered that exposure to air pollution has a direct adverse health effect on the liver and causes liver fibrosis, an illness associated with metabolic disease and liver cancer. [More]
TMIGD1 protein could be a novel target for restoring kidney function from kidney disease

TMIGD1 protein could be a novel target for restoring kidney function from kidney disease

A new discovery by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers may change how kidney disease is treated in the future. [More]
Boca Raton Regional Hospital introduces ultra-minimally invasive procedure for patients with atrial fibrillation

Boca Raton Regional Hospital introduces ultra-minimally invasive procedure for patients with atrial fibrillation

Boca Raton Regional Hospital's Richard G. Cartledge, MD, FACS, has begun performing ultra-minimally invasive left atrial appendage ligation for atrial fibrillation patients who are on anticoagulants such as Coumadin, Xarelto or Effient. Dr. Cartledge, who is Chief of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Hospital, is one of a select group of surgeons nationally using this method, which involves making two microscopic incisions in order to seal off the left atrial appendage (LAA) in patients where anticoagulants are contraindicated or who refuse to be on such medications. [More]
Prime Healthcare Services acquires St. Joseph Mercy Port Huron

Prime Healthcare Services acquires St. Joseph Mercy Port Huron

Prime Healthcare Services, the fastest growing hospital system in the nation, announced today that it has completed the acquisition of St. Joseph Mercy Port Huron. As a result, St. Joseph Mercy Port Huron will now be known as Lake Huron Medical Center. [More]
Allergan announces positive results from AVYCAZ Phase III studies for treatment of cUTI

Allergan announces positive results from AVYCAZ Phase III studies for treatment of cUTI

Allergan plc. today announced positive topline results from RECAPTURE 1 and 2, the pivotal Phase III studies evaluating the antibiotic AVYCAZ (ceftazidime-avibactam) as a treatment for adult hospitalized patients with complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI), including pyelonephritis. [More]
Smoking prevalence remains same but proportion of smokers with no intention of quitting increases

Smoking prevalence remains same but proportion of smokers with no intention of quitting increases

Smoking prevalence has stayed the same but the proportion with no intention of quitting has risen in the last seven years, according to results from the latest EUROASPIRE surveys presented for the first time today at ESC Congress 2015 by Professor Kornelia Kotseva, chair of the EUROASPIRE Steering Committee and senior clinical research fellow at Imperial College London, UK. [More]
Annual diabetic retinopathy screening for children with type 1 diabetes should begin at later age, study says

Annual diabetic retinopathy screening for children with type 1 diabetes should begin at later age, study says

A new study has found that the occurrence of advanced forms of a diabetic eye disease remains low among children living with diabetes, regardless of how long they have had the disease or their ability to keep blood sugar levels controlled. Researchers are therefore recommending that most children with type 1 diabetes delay annual diabetic retinopathy screenings until age 15, or 5 years after their diabetes diagnosis, whichever occurs later. [More]
Available cognitive information has no impact on patient's cognitive decline

Available cognitive information has no impact on patient's cognitive decline

Does knowing whether older adults are cognitively impaired affect the treatment they receive from their primary care physician? Does it impact the rate of the patient's cognitive decline? [More]
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