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MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

Treatment with MRI-guided focused ultrasound significantly improves tremors and quality of life in patients with essential tremor (ET), the most common movement disorder, according to a study published in the August 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Moderate physical activity reduces risk of acute cardiovascular event in older people

Moderate physical activity reduces risk of acute cardiovascular event in older people

Moderate physical activity is associated with a greater than 50% reduction in cardiovascular death in over-65s, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. The 12 year study in nearly 2500 adults aged 65 to 74 years found that moderate physical activity reduced the risk of an acute cardiovascular event by more than 30%. High levels of physical activity led to greater risk reductions. [More]
Study: Low socioeconomic status linked to higher risk of second heart attack or stroke

Study: Low socioeconomic status linked to higher risk of second heart attack or stroke

Low socioeconomic status is associated with a higher risk of a second heart attack or stroke, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. The study in nearly 30 000 patients with a prior heart attack found that the risk of a second event was 36% lower for those in the highest income quintile compared to the lowest and increased by 14% in divorced compared to married patients. [More]
First ESC Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation published online

First ESC Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation published online

The first European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation developed in collaboration with the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) are published online today in European Heart Journal and the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, and on the ESC Website. [More]
Non-wearable sensor system can be used to predict risk of falling among seniors within 3 weeks

Non-wearable sensor system can be used to predict risk of falling among seniors within 3 weeks

Each year, millions of people--especially those 65 and older--fall. Such falls can be serious, leading to broken bones, head injuries, hospitalizations or even death. Now, researchers from the Sinclair School of Nursing and the College of Engineering at the University of Missouri found that sensors that measure in-home gait speed and stride length can predict likely falls. [More]
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation awards Quality of Life grants to 79 nonprofit organizations

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation awards Quality of Life grants to 79 nonprofit organizations

The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a national nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for individuals living with paralysis, announced it has awarded $575,704 in Quality of Life grants to 79 nonprofit organizations nationwide. [More]
Scientists report new neurological complication from Zika virus infection

Scientists report new neurological complication from Zika virus infection

Dr. John England, Professor and Chair of Neurology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and colleagues in Honduras and Venezuela have reported a new neurological complication of infection with the Zika virus. [More]
Researchers explore molecular mechanisms through which lead exposure may affect neural stem cells

Researchers explore molecular mechanisms through which lead exposure may affect neural stem cells

Researchers have identified a potential molecular mechanism through which lead, a pervasive environmental toxin, may harm neural stem cells and neurodevelopment in children. [More]
Non-wearable sensor system measures walking patterns of senior citizens to predict risk of falling

Non-wearable sensor system measures walking patterns of senior citizens to predict risk of falling

Each year, millions of people—especially those 65 and older—fall. Such falls can be serious, leading to broken bones, head injuries, hospitalizations or even death. [More]
New study reveals physicians not discouraging Egyptian women from practicing female circumcision

New study reveals physicians not discouraging Egyptian women from practicing female circumcision

Women in Egypt are seeking out doctors' opinions on whether they should circumcise their daughters and, though it is illegal there, physicians are not discouraging the practice, giving legitimacy to a procedure that has serious medical risks, according to a new study led by a former Stanford University School of Medicine researcher. [More]
Arab uprising linked to detrimental effects on health and life expectancy in several countries

Arab uprising linked to detrimental effects on health and life expectancy in several countries

The Arab uprising in 2010 and subsequent wars in the eastern Mediterranean region have had serious detrimental effects on the health and life expectancy of the people living in many of the 22 countries in the region, according to a major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), published in The Lancet Global Health journal. [More]
New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

In a special report released August 23 in the journal Radiology, a team of researchers including Deborah Levine, MD, Director of Obstetric & Gynecologic ultrasound at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School, documented the brain abnormalities associated with congenital Zika in 45 confirmed and presumed cases from northeastern Brazil. [More]
Researchers trace roots of humane medical practices to pioneering French physician

Researchers trace roots of humane medical practices to pioneering French physician

Researchers at Barrow Neurological Institute have traced the roots of humane medical practices to a pioneering French physician who treated people with deformities as humans instead of "monsters," as they were commonly called. [More]
Study reports significant under-use of topical INS therapy for chronic rhinosinusitis patients

Study reports significant under-use of topical INS therapy for chronic rhinosinusitis patients

Topical intranasal steroid therapy continues to be underused for patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) despite practice guidelines that recommend daily use, according to a study published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery. [More]
Study reveals disadvantaged neighborhood puts teens at increased risk for being overweight or obese

Study reveals disadvantaged neighborhood puts teens at increased risk for being overweight or obese

A new Kaiser Permanente study found an increased risk for becoming overweight or obese among normal-weight 18-year-olds who lived in neighborhoods with lower education or income levels. [More]
UNC cardiologist examines challenges facing cardiac intensive care units and clinicians

UNC cardiologist examines challenges facing cardiac intensive care units and clinicians

Jason Katz, MD, MHS, associate professor of medicine at UNC School of Medicine and medical director of the cardiac intensive care unit, was the lead author of a recently published manuscript in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that examined the early growth and maturation of critical care cardiology, and the challenges and uncertainties that threaten to stymie the growth of this fledgling discipline. [More]
Serious heart problem can run in families and occur at similar ages, study suggests

Serious heart problem can run in families and occur at similar ages, study suggests

People with a family member who had an aortic dissection—a spontaneous tear in one of the body's main arteries—should take note of the age that family member was when the aortic dissection occurred. [More]
Study explores how parental use of religious coping strategies in NICU affects family's interactions

Study explores how parental use of religious coping strategies in NICU affects family's interactions

Understanding how parents cope while their child is in the neonatal intensive care unit could lead to better support for the family and a more successful transition to home when the baby is healthy, according to Penn State College of Medicine and Penn State Harrisburg researchers. [More]
High exposure to unconventional natural gas wells linked to migraine headaches, sinus and fatigue

High exposure to unconventional natural gas wells linked to migraine headaches, sinus and fatigue

New research suggests that Pennsylvania residents with the highest exposure to active natural gas wells operated by the hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") industry are nearly twice as likely to suffer from a combination of migraine headaches, chronic nasal and sinus symptoms and severe fatigue. [More]
Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Are there any ways of preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease or other forms of age-associated dementia? While several previously published studies have suggested a protective effect for cognitive activities such as reading, playing games or attending cultural events, questions have been raised about whether these studies reveal a real cause-and-effect relationship or if the associations could result from unmeasured factors. [More]
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