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WLSA's Convergence Summit to focus on global adoption of technology-enabled health care

WLSA's Convergence Summit to focus on global adoption of technology-enabled health care

The Wireless-Life Sciences Alliance said today that its ninth annual Convergence Summit here next month will focus on achieving broader global adoption of technology-enabled health care at a time when the pace of innovation in connected health and personal health solutions is accelerating. [More]
Courtagen collaborates with CCMC to identify alterations in genes associated with ASD

Courtagen collaborates with CCMC to identify alterations in genes associated with ASD

Courtagen Life Sciences, Inc., an innovative molecular information company, announced today a collaboration with Connecticut Children's Medical Center to utilize Courtagen's sophisticated Next Generation Sequencing assays to help identify and characterize alterations found in genes associated with ASD. [More]
First Edition: April 23, 2014

First Edition: April 23, 2014

Today's headlines include a range of health policy news reports, including developments related to the health law, to the marketplace and at the state level. [More]

Report recommends that medical insurers use prescription monitoring data to reduce opioid abuse

The Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Center of Excellence at Brandeis University has issued a ground-breaking report recommending that medical insurers use prescription monitoring data to reduce the overdoses, deaths and health care costs associated with abuse of opioids and other prescription drugs. [More]
DaVita Kidney Care expands care of kidney patients in Malaysia

DaVita Kidney Care expands care of kidney patients in Malaysia

DaVita Kidney Care, a division of DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc. and a leading provider of kidney care services, today announced it acquired three hemodialysis centers from Malaysian dialysis provider Sinar Indentiti Sbn Bhd, further expanding its care of kidney patients in the country. [More]

TWi and Endo Pharmaceuticals settle patent litigation over Lidoderm product

TWi Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that it has entered into a settlement agreement with Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc., Teikoku Seiyaku Co., Ltd. and Teikoku Pharma USA, Inc. to settle all outstanding patent litigation related to TWi's lidocaine topical patch 5% product. [More]

7 in 10 Americans support mandated coverage of birth control medications, shows survey

Nearly 7 in 10 Americans support mandated coverage of birth control medications, according to a new national survey by researchers at the University of Michigan Health System. [More]

Inconsistent insurance coverage limits healthcare availability for young adults

Perhaps due to lack of or inconsistent insurance coverage, young adults age 18 to 25 tend to go to the doctor's office less often than children or adolescents, yet have higher rates of emergency room use, finds a study in the Journal of Adolescent Health. [More]

Researchers examine interaction between alcohol and tobacco in risk of ESCC

The rate of developing esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) nearly doubles in those who both smoke and drink compared to those who only smoke or drink, according to new research published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology. [More]
Viewpoints: The case against Jenny Mccarthy's vaccine stand; apathy on HIV; defeating Alzheimer's

Viewpoints: The case against Jenny Mccarthy's vaccine stand; apathy on HIV; defeating Alzheimer's

What do you call someone who sows misinformation, stokes fear, abets behavior that endangers people's health, extracts enormous visibility from doing so and then says the equivalent of "Who? Me?" I'm not aware of any common noun for a bad actor of this sort. But there's a proper noun: Jenny McCarthy (Frank Bruni, 4/21). [More]

Stronger incentives for medical innovators can reduce health care spending, say researchers

To help rein in massive health care spending, a new RAND study concludes that U.S. policy makers should urgently find ways to incentivize pharmaceutical companies and device makers to develop products that produce more value. [More]
Glaucoma drug may help reverse obesity-related vision loss in women

Glaucoma drug may help reverse obesity-related vision loss in women

An inexpensive glaucoma drug, when added to a weight loss plan, can improve vision for women with a disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]

Detailing the winners: Which insurers scored the most health exchanges sign-ups

In California, it was Anthem Blue Cross, while Kaiser Permanente, Rocky Mountain Health Plans and the Colorado HealthOP appeared to fare well through that state's online insurance marketplace. Meanwhile, reports also track how the small business exchanges did in Rhode Island and Connecticut. [More]

Study calls for more access to on-site athletic trainers to properly assess injuries

​Basketball is a popular high school sport in the United States with 1 million participants annually. A recently published study by researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital is the first to compare and describe the occurrence and distribution patterns of basketball-related injuries treated in emergency departments and the high school athletic training setting among adolescents and teens. [More]

Study: Added benefit of turoctocog alfa is not proven

Turoctocog alfa (trade name: NovoEight) has been approved since November 2013 for the prevention and treatment of bleeding in patients with haemophilia A. [More]

21 European cities emerge as final contenders in Bloomberg Philanthropies' Mayors Challenge

Bloomberg Philanthropies today revealed the 21 European cities that have emerged as final contenders in its 2013-2014 Mayors Challenge, a competition to inspire cities to generate innovative ideas that solve major challenges and improve city life, and that ultimately can spread to other cities. [More]

Polls offer competing visions of electorate's views on health law

A Fox poll finds more than half of voters are inclined to support candidates that oppose the health overhaul, but Democrats say that other polls show a band of independent voters who may not like the law but don't want it repealed. [More]
New computational tool identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations

New computational tool identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations

A computational tool developed at the University of Utah (U of U) has successfully identified diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases, U of U researchers and their colleagues report in a new study in The American Journal of Human Genetics. [More]
Pfizer reports positive results from two tofacitinib Phase 3 trials for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis

Pfizer reports positive results from two tofacitinib Phase 3 trials for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis

Pfizer Inc. announced today top-line results from two pivotal Phase 3 trials from the Oral treatment Psoriasis Trials (OPT) Program, OPT Pivotal #1 (A3921078) and OPT Pivotal #2 (A3921079), evaluating the efficacy and safety of tofacitinib, an oral Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor, the first in a new class of medicines being investigated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. [More]
University of Utah software successfully identifies diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases

University of Utah software successfully identifies diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases

A computational tool developed at the University of Utah (U of U) has successfully identified diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases, U of U researchers and their colleagues report in a new study in The American Journal of Human Genetics. The software, Phevor (Phenotype Driven Variant Ontological Re-ranking tool), identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations by analyzing the exomes, or areas of DNA where proteins that code for genes are made, in individual patients and small families. [More]