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Most women do not know age heart screenings should start, survey finds

Most women do not know age heart screenings should start, survey finds

A new national survey by Orlando Health found that most women are unaware of the age at which heart screenings should begin. [More]
South African study shows that person-to person transmission drives drug-resistant TB epidemics

South African study shows that person-to person transmission drives drug-resistant TB epidemics

A study published today in The New England Journal of Medicine provides compelling evidence that extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) is spread from person-to-person in the KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa from 2011-2014. [More]
Global leaders announce launch of new council to help eradicate malaria

Global leaders announce launch of new council to help eradicate malaria

Bill Gates, co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Ray Chambers, the United Nations Secretary-General's Special Envoy for Health in Agenda 2030 and for Malaria, today announced the launch of the End Malaria Council, a group of influential public and private sector leaders who aim to ensure malaria eradication remains a top global priority. [More]
STS releases first publicly accessible report of outcomes from lung cancer surgery

STS releases first publicly accessible report of outcomes from lung cancer surgery

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons has released the first publicly accessible national report of outcomes from lobectomy, a lung cancer procedure that removes a portion of the lung. [More]
Novel approach for imaging immune cell movements identifies initial steps in inflammatory arthritis

Novel approach for imaging immune cell movements identifies initial steps in inflammatory arthritis

Using a novel approach for imaging the movement of immune cells in living animals, researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases have identified what appear to be the initial steps leading to joint inflammation in a model of inflammatory arthritis. [More]
Public health experts support new federal rule to protect nonsmoking public housing residents

Public health experts support new federal rule to protect nonsmoking public housing residents

In response to a new federal rule mandating smoke-free policies in federally funded public housing authorities, three public health experts applaud the efforts of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to protect nonsmoking residents from the harmful effects of tobacco exposure. [More]
MGH-developed CTC-iChip with digital PCR assay improves detection of early-stage liver cancer

MGH-developed CTC-iChip with digital PCR assay improves detection of early-stage liver cancer

Use of an advanced form of the commonly used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to analyze circulating tumor cells (CTCs) may greatly increase the ability to diagnose early-stage cancer, increasing the likelihood of successful treatment. [More]
High blood levels of protein may help preserve kidney function, study suggests

High blood levels of protein may help preserve kidney function, study suggests

Higher blood levels of a protein called klotho may help preserve kidney function, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
FDA approves new oral medication for treating chronic idiopathic constipation in adult patients

FDA approves new oral medication for treating chronic idiopathic constipation in adult patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Trulance (plecanatide) for the treatment of Chronic Idiopathic Constipation (CIC) in adult patients. [More]
Study shows evidence that person-to-person transmission drives spread of drug-resistant TB

Study shows evidence that person-to-person transmission drives spread of drug-resistant TB

A study published today in The New England Journal of Medicine provides compelling evidence that extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) is spread from person-to-person in the KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa from 2011-2014. [More]
Scientists find altered blood-brain barrier and increased intestinal permeability in people with ASD

Scientists find altered blood-brain barrier and increased intestinal permeability in people with ASD

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has the dubious distinction of being the fastest-growing developmental disability in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Researchers explore ins and outs of genome sequencing in newborns

Researchers explore ins and outs of genome sequencing in newborns

When you have a baby, a nurse or a phlebotomist performs a heel stick to take a few drops of blood from your infant and sends it off to a state lab for a battery of tests. [More]
Interface Clinical Research outlines new model for running primary care trials

Interface Clinical Research outlines new model for running primary care trials

New clinical trials company, Interface Clinical Research, outlined a new model for running primary care clinical trials at their launch yesterday at the Royal Society in London. [More]
ACA increases accessibility of recommended cancer screening for millions, research finds

ACA increases accessibility of recommended cancer screening for millions, research finds

The Affordable Care Act helped make recommended cancer screening more affordable and accessible for millions of Americans, according to new University of Virginia research. [More]
MRI as a new tool for MS, with the help of Siemens Healthineers and Biogen

MRI as a new tool for MS, with the help of Siemens Healthineers and Biogen

Siemens Healthineers and Biogen announced today that the companies plan to jointly develop Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) applications with the intent of quantifying key markers of multiple sclerosis (MS) disease activity and progression. Biogen is a leading biotechnology company with a deep focus on neurological and autoimmune conditions, which for two decades has been at the forefront of delivering therapies to MS patients. [More]
Blocking molecular signaling pathway could prevent or reverse peripheral neuropathy

Blocking molecular signaling pathway could prevent or reverse peripheral neuropathy

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the University of Manitoba and St. Boniface Hospital Albrechtsen Research Centre in Canada, have identified a molecular signaling pathway that, when blocked, promotes sensory neuron growth and prevents or reverses peripheral neuropathy in cell and rodent models of type 1 and 2 diabetes, chemotherapy-induced neuropathy and HIV. [More]
Study finds link between obesity-related disease and epigenetic modifications

Study finds link between obesity-related disease and epigenetic modifications

Obesity has been linked to "letter" changes at many different sites in the genome, yet these differences do not fully explain the variation in people's body mass index (BMI) or why some overweight people develop health complications while others don't. [More]
New Apple ResearchKit app from Penn Medicine focuses on sarcoidosis patients

New Apple ResearchKit app from Penn Medicine focuses on sarcoidosis patients

Penn Medicine today launched its first Apple ResearchKit app, focused on patients with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory condition that can affect the lungs, skin, eyes, heart, brain, and other organs. [More]
Cockroach bait may be easier, cheaper way to manage key asthma trigger in children

Cockroach bait may be easier, cheaper way to manage key asthma trigger in children

It may be easier and cheaper for parents to manage a key asthma trigger in children -- exposure to cockroaches -- than previously thought, according to a new Tulane University study published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Heart CT scans can help personalize treatment for patients with mild high blood pressure

Using data from a national study, Johns Hopkins researchers determined that using heart CT scans can help personalize treatment in patients whose blood pressure falls in the gray zone of just above normal or mild high blood pressure. [More]
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