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Allergan announces positive results from AVYCAZ Phase III studies for treatment of cUTI

Allergan announces positive results from AVYCAZ Phase III studies for treatment of cUTI

Allergan plc. today announced positive topline results from RECAPTURE 1 and 2, the pivotal Phase III studies evaluating the antibiotic AVYCAZ (ceftazidime-avibactam) as a treatment for adult hospitalized patients with complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI), including pyelonephritis. [More]
Smoking prevalence remains same but proportion of smokers with no intention of quitting increases

Smoking prevalence remains same but proportion of smokers with no intention of quitting increases

Smoking prevalence has stayed the same but the proportion with no intention of quitting has risen in the last seven years, according to results from the latest EUROASPIRE surveys presented for the first time today at ESC Congress 2015 by Professor Kornelia Kotseva, chair of the EUROASPIRE Steering Committee and senior clinical research fellow at Imperial College London, UK. [More]
Annual diabetic retinopathy screening for children with type 1 diabetes should begin at later age, study says

Annual diabetic retinopathy screening for children with type 1 diabetes should begin at later age, study says

A new study has found that the occurrence of advanced forms of a diabetic eye disease remains low among children living with diabetes, regardless of how long they have had the disease or their ability to keep blood sugar levels controlled. Researchers are therefore recommending that most children with type 1 diabetes delay annual diabetic retinopathy screenings until age 15, or 5 years after their diabetes diagnosis, whichever occurs later. [More]
Available cognitive information has no impact on patient's cognitive decline

Available cognitive information has no impact on patient's cognitive decline

Does knowing whether older adults are cognitively impaired affect the treatment they receive from their primary care physician? Does it impact the rate of the patient's cognitive decline? [More]
Costs for spinal fusion vary substantially by region, shows new research

Costs for spinal fusion vary substantially by region, shows new research

Costs for spinal fusion vary substantially by region, with costs being lowest in the Midwest and highest in the Northeast, according to the new research by Dr. W. Ryan Spiker and colleagues of University of Utah, Salt Lake City. [More]
New testing methods may help identify genetic mutations potentially linked to autism among children

New testing methods may help identify genetic mutations potentially linked to autism among children

The use of two newer genetic testing technologies (chromosomal microarray analysis and whole-exome sequencing) among children with autism spectrum disorder may help identify genetic mutations potentially linked to the disorder, according to a study in the September 1 issue of JAMA. [More]
Report: 3 out of 4 U.S. adults have hearts older than their actual age

Report: 3 out of 4 U.S. adults have hearts older than their actual age

Your heart may be older than you are – and that's not good. According to a new CDC Vital Signs report, 3 out of 4 U.S. adults have a predicted heart age that is older than their actual age. This means they are at higher risk for heart attacks and stroke. [More]
ACP urges health professionals to speak out on mass deportation of immigrants

ACP urges health professionals to speak out on mass deportation of immigrants

The American College of Physicians (ACP) today called on physicians, individually and collectively, to speak out against proposals to deport the 12 million U.S. residents who lack documentation of legal residency status, citing the adverse impact that mass deportation would have on individual and the health of the public. [More]
Availity earns CAQH CORE Clearinghouse Product Phase III Certification Seal

Availity earns CAQH CORE Clearinghouse Product Phase III Certification Seal

Availity, the nation's largest real-time health information network, announced that it earned a CAQH Committee on Operating Rules for Information Exchange (CORE®) Clearinghouse Product Phase III Certification Seal. [More]

Former all-American wrestler speaks about his personal battle with chronic muscle disease

In 2009, Mike Powell was where he'd always wanted to be. A former all-American wrestler himself, he'd returned to his Chicago-area high school to become the toughest wrestling coach around, inspiring young athletes with a brutal mix of love and punishing workouts. [More]
Brush DJ app encourages youngsters to adopt and maintain oral health care routine

Brush DJ app encourages youngsters to adopt and maintain oral health care routine

Research published in the British Dental Journal shows that Brush DJ, an app designed to encourage youngsters to adopt and maintain an effective oral health care routine using evidence-based techniques, is effective in its aims. [More]
New statistical model may help predict patients most likely to benefits from surgical treatment for mesothelioma

New statistical model may help predict patients most likely to benefits from surgical treatment for mesothelioma

A new statistical model may help predict which patients are most likely to receive life-extending benefits from surgical treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), according to an article in the September 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Survey: Mental health care inaccessible to many Americans

Survey: Mental health care inaccessible to many Americans

Nearly 90 percent of Americans value mental health and physical health equally, yet about one-third find mental health care inaccessible, and more than four in 10 see cost as a barrier to treatment for most people, according to the results of a new survey released today by the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. [More]
SLU scientist receives grant to solve blood-clotting mysteries

SLU scientist receives grant to solve blood-clotting mysteries

Last summer, SLU scientists made a breakthrough discovery about the way in which blood clots. Through X-ray crystallography, they solved the molecular structure of prothrombin, an important blood-clotting protein, revealing an unexpected, flexible role for a "linker" region that may be the key to developing better life-saving drugs. [More]
IV drug abusers who undergo infective endocarditis surgery face higher risk of reoperation or death

IV drug abusers who undergo infective endocarditis surgery face higher risk of reoperation or death

Injection drug users who undergo surgery for infective endocarditis (IE) have a significantly higher risk of reoperation or death between 3 and 6 months after surgery compared to patients who develop endocarditis who are not IV drug abusers, according to an article in the September 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]

EHR documentation tools should be redesigned to meet physicians’ needs

When physicians prepare for patient visits, one of their first steps is to review clinic notes or health records that recap their patients' medical history. Since the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009, approximately 78 percent of office-based physicians have adopted electronic health records (EHR). [More]
ICAAP12 hosts intensive two-day marathon meeting to raise awareness on HIV issues

ICAAP12 hosts intensive two-day marathon meeting to raise awareness on HIV issues

The International Congress on AIDS in Asia Pacific (ICAAP) 2015 is pleased to announce that it recently concluded an intensive two-day marathon meeting to determine the high-level content of ICAAP12, the 12th International Congress on AIDS in Asia Pacific. [More]
Temple-led study shows benefits of using digital health application for COPD patients

Temple-led study shows benefits of using digital health application for COPD patients

Early intervention facilitated by a digital health application for reporting symptoms of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) provides key benefits for patients, according to the results of a Temple-led, two-year clinical study. [More]
Affinity tuning can make CAR T cells spare normal cells and attack cancer cells

Affinity tuning can make CAR T cells spare normal cells and attack cancer cells

A new development in engineering chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, called affinity tuning, can make the CAR T cells spare normal cells and better recognize and attack cancer cells, which may help lower the toxicity associated with this type of immunotherapy when used against solid tumors, according to a preclinical study. [More]
Study: Inner-city neighbourhoods may affect risk of dying from cardiovascular disease

Study: Inner-city neighbourhoods may affect risk of dying from cardiovascular disease

The inner-city neighbourhood in which someone lives may affect his or her risk of developing or dying from cardiovascular disease, a new research paper suggests. [More]
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