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New consensus statement recommends transition of care for adolescents with neurologic disorders

New consensus statement recommends transition of care for adolescents with neurologic disorders

A new consensus statement provides recommendations for transitioning adolescents and young adults with neurologic disorders to adult care. [More]
Levels of peptide hormone adropin linked to carbohydrate intake

Levels of peptide hormone adropin linked to carbohydrate intake

In research featured in the August edition of Obesity, Saint Louis University investigator Andrew Butler, Ph.D., and his team report that levels of the peptide hormone adropin vary based on carbohydrate consumption and appear to be linked to lipid metabolism. [More]
Waterloo researchers unveil new screening tool and data at 2016 AAIC

Waterloo researchers unveil new screening tool and data at 2016 AAIC

Two studies involving University of Waterloo researchers presented this week at the 2016 Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in Toronto highlight a new diagnostic tool that can identify Alzheimer's disease long before the onset of symptoms as well as the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in Ontario. [More]
Many vivacious seniors not retired from sex, study finds

Many vivacious seniors not retired from sex, study finds

Despite societal perceptions that older adults' love lives are ancient history, many seniors are anything but retired from sex, a new study suggests. [More]
Study reveals insights into survival, surgical interventions for children with trisomy 13 and 18

Study reveals insights into survival, surgical interventions for children with trisomy 13 and 18

Among children born with the chromosome disorders trisomy 13 or 18 in Ontario, Canada, early death was the most common outcome, but 10 percent to 13 percent survived for 10 years, according to a study appearing in the July 26 issue of JAMA. [More]
Study highlights need for effective support when pregnant women opt for C-section

Study highlights need for effective support when pregnant women opt for C-section

A study involving over 6,500 pregnant women from 6 countries in northern Europe highlights a clear need for appropriate support and advice when cesarean section (c-section) is elected for non-medical reasons, and for the accurate communication of the risk and benefits of c-section birth, suggests new research published in the Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology. [More]
New combination treatment improves overall survival in patients with malignant melanoma

New combination treatment improves overall survival in patients with malignant melanoma

Among patients with melanoma, those who received both ipilimumab (Yervoy) and local peripheral treatments such as radiotherapy or electrochemotherapy had significantly prolonged overall survival compared with those who received only ipilimumab, according to a retrospective clinical study. [More]
FDA approves safety labeling changes for fluoroquinolone antibiotics

FDA approves safety labeling changes for fluoroquinolone antibiotics

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved safety labeling changes for a class of antibiotics, called fluoroquinolones, to enhance warnings about their association with disabling and potentially permanent side effects and to limit their use in patients with less serious bacterial infections. [More]
Online behavioural intervention provides long-term, sustainable ways to lose weight

Online behavioural intervention provides long-term, sustainable ways to lose weight

New research, led by the University of Southampton, has found that an online behavioural counselling tool is effective at helping people lose weight. [More]
Maternal placental syndromes increase short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease

Maternal placental syndromes increase short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease

The short-term risk of developing cardiovascular disease following a first pregnancy is higher for women experiencing placental syndromes and a preterm birth or an infant born smaller than the usual size, a University of South Florida study reports. [More]
Early and late menopause linked to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Early and late menopause linked to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Women who begin menopause before age 46 or after 55 have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study of more than 124,000 women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative, a large national trial aimed at preventing disease in postmenopausal women. [More]
Mice study shows stem cell infusion could help treat glaucoma

Mice study shows stem cell infusion could help treat glaucoma

An infusion of stem cells could help restore proper drainage for fluid-clogged eyes at risk for glaucoma. That's the upshot of a study led by a Veterans Affairs and University of Iowa team. [More]
Large study of familial ALS finds new gene variant present in 3% of all patients with disease

Large study of familial ALS finds new gene variant present in 3% of all patients with disease

Variations in a gene with multiple functions in neurons are present in approximately 3 percent of all cases of ALS in North American and European populations, both sporadic and familial, making it one of the most common genetic causes of the disease, according to a paper published in Nature Genetics. [More]
Scientists estimate 1.65 million childbearing women in the Americas could be at risk of Zika infections

Scientists estimate 1.65 million childbearing women in the Americas could be at risk of Zika infections

Research by scientists in the US and UK has estimated that up to 1.65 million childbearing women in Central and South America could become infected by the Zika virus by the end of the first wave of the epidemic. [More]
Care4Moms study to identify, address health care needs of mothers with medically fragile infants

Care4Moms study to identify, address health care needs of mothers with medically fragile infants

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine has received nearly $900,000 in federal funding to identify and address the needs of mothers with medically fragile infants, a vastly understudied group. [More]
Improved access to Primary Stroke Centers may lead to better outcomes in stroke patients

Improved access to Primary Stroke Centers may lead to better outcomes in stroke patients

Physicians and families of stroke victims often have to make quick decisions about whether to treat patients locally or refer them to a more distant Primary Stroke Center. [More]
Ageing population can stimulate breakthroughs in medicine, technology but increase political risks

Ageing population can stimulate breakthroughs in medicine, technology but increase political risks

The UN estimates that the number of people aged 65 and older will have reached almost a billion by 2030. [More]
Salmonella protein can reduce drug resistant molecule found in cancer cells

Salmonella protein can reduce drug resistant molecule found in cancer cells

A surprising result in an experiment on Salmonella bacteria has led to a discovery that may make drug resistant cancer cells more treatable by conventional chemotherapies. [More]
Simple, inexpensive psychotherapy treatment as effective as CBT for treating depression in adults

Simple, inexpensive psychotherapy treatment as effective as CBT for treating depression in adults

A simple and inexpensive psychotherapy or talking therapy known as behavioural activation (BA) is as effective at treating depression in adults as the gold-standard cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), and can be delivered by non-specialist staff with minimal training at far less cost, according to new research published in The Lancet. [More]
Changes in volume of patients in trauma centers can influence patient outcomes

Changes in volume of patients in trauma centers can influence patient outcomes

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers have demonstrated for the first time that changes over time in the volume of patients seen by trauma centers influence the likelihood of seriously injured patients living or dying. [More]
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