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TSRI scientists awarded $2.3 million grant to find ways to erase traumatic memories

TSRI scientists awarded $2.3 million grant to find ways to erase traumatic memories

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded $2.3 million from the Department of Health and Human Services of the National Institutes of Health to better understand how memories are stored in the hopes of eventually being able to treat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by erasing traumatic memories without altering other, more benign ones. [More]

MU, UMSL receive grant to develop behavioral health workforce

The University of Missouri School of Social Work, in partnership with the University of Missouri-St. Louis School of Social Work, has received more than $1 million from the United States Health Resources and Services Administration to expand training to mental and behavioral health professionals throughout Missouri. [More]
UTHealth opens Trauma and Grief Center for Youth

UTHealth opens Trauma and Grief Center for Youth

Children who are having difficulty processing trauma or loss can now turn to the Trauma and Grief Center for Youth at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Scientists receive NIH grants to explore sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Scientists receive NIH grants to explore sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

Nine groups of scientists will receive funding totaling $5.9 million in 2014 to work together on increasing the understanding of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), the leading cause of death from epilepsy. The consortium becomes the second Center Without Walls, an initiative to speed the pace of research on difficult problems in epilepsy by promoting collaborative research. [More]
Study points to need for improving pediatric benefits under the Affordable Care Act

Study points to need for improving pediatric benefits under the Affordable Care Act

An article published in the Health Affairs December issue is the first ever comprehensive analysis to investigate the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) Essential Health Benefit (EHB) as it relates to children. The study found that the EHB has resulted in a state-by-state patchwork of coverage for children and adolescents that has significant exclusions, particularly for children with developmental disabilities and other special health care needs. [More]
New Crime Victims' Institute series explores human sex trafficking

New Crime Victims' Institute series explores human sex trafficking

Human sex trafficking is a serious problem both domestically and internationally and enhanced education is necessary to address the risk factors for entry into the sex trade, the physical and mental health consequences of victimization, and institutional responses to victims, according to a new series published by the Crime Victims' Institute at Sam Houston State University. [More]
Two medical imaging techniques could predict effectiveness of TB drugs

Two medical imaging techniques could predict effectiveness of TB drugs

Two medical imaging techniques, called positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT), could be used in combination as a biomarker to predict the effectiveness of antibiotic drug regimens being tested to treat tuberculosis (TB) patients, according to researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
People with first-episode psychosis may benefit from medication treatment changes, study finds

People with first-episode psychosis may benefit from medication treatment changes, study finds

Many patients with first-episode psychosis receive medications that do not comply with recommended guidelines for first-episode treatment, researchers have found. Current guidelines emphasize low doses of antipsychotic drugs and strategies for minimizing the side effects that might contribute to patients stopping their medication. [More]
MRIGlobal awarded $3 million contract to provide HPV vaccine

MRIGlobal awarded $3 million contract to provide HPV vaccine

MRIGlobal today announced that it has been awarded a $3 million contract amendment from the National Cancer Institute's PREVENT Cancer Program to provide a vaccine for the Human Papillomavirus or HPV, the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. MRIGlobal will lead a team that will produce the vaccine to be used in a Phase I clinical trial. [More]
Minnesota hospitals prevent patient harms, save $93 million in health spending

Minnesota hospitals prevent patient harms, save $93 million in health spending

Minnesota hospitals and health systems have prevented more than 12,000 patients from being harmed and saved more than $93 million as a result of a reduction in hospital-acquired conditions from 2010-13. Nationwide, hospitals prevented 1.3 million patient harms and saved more than $12 billion in health spending, according to a report issued today by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [More]
Physical activity linked to children's brain and cognitive development, scholastic achievement

Physical activity linked to children's brain and cognitive development, scholastic achievement

Over the past thirty years, physical activity among children has declined markedly. The public health implications of this decline include a growing prevalence of obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. A new issue of Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development expands the focus to ask whether physical activity is also related to children's brain and cognitive development and achievement in school. [More]
Researchers develop low-cost, electricity-free device for detecting DNA of infectious pathogens

Researchers develop low-cost, electricity-free device for detecting DNA of infectious pathogens

Diagnosing HIV and other infectious diseases presents unique challenges in remote locations that lack electric power, refrigeration, and appropriately trained health care staff. To address these issues, researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have developed a low-cost, electricity-free device capable of detecting the DNA of infectious pathogens, including HIV-1. [More]
New study details weight loss patterns of breastfed newborns

New study details weight loss patterns of breastfed newborns

Using weights obtained from over 100,000 Northern California babies, a new study is the first to detail the weight loss patterns of exclusively breastfed newborns. The results show that some breastfed babies lose weight faster and for a longer period than was previously recognized. [More]
Unsafe infant bedding increases risk of sudden infant death syndrome

Unsafe infant bedding increases risk of sudden infant death syndrome

Nearly 55 percent of U.S. infants are placed to sleep with bedding that increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, despite recommendations against the practice, report researchers at the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other institutions. [More]
SLU researcher discovers way to block pain pathway

SLU researcher discovers way to block pain pathway

In research published in the medical journal Brain, Saint Louis University researcher Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D. and colleagues within SLU, the National Institutes of Health and other academic institutions have discovered a way to block a pain pathway in animal models of chronic neuropathic pain including pain caused by chemotherapeutic agents and bone cancer pain suggesting a promising new approach to pain relief. [More]
Experimental Ebola vaccine appears safe, produces immune system responses in NIH phase 1 trial

Experimental Ebola vaccine appears safe, produces immune system responses in NIH phase 1 trial

An experimental vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease was well-tolerated and produced immune system responses in all 20 healthy adults who received it in a Phase 1 clinical trial conducted by researchers from the National Institutes of Health. The candidate vaccine, which was co-developed by the NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and GlaxoSmithKline, was tested at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. [More]
Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Using a new imaging technique, National Institutes of Health researchers have found that the biological machinery that builds DNA can insert molecules into the DNA strand that are damaged as a result of environmental exposures. These damaged molecules trigger cell death that produces some human diseases, according to the researchers. [More]
University of Vermont Medical Center recognized with 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award

University of Vermont Medical Center recognized with 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America today recognized the University of Vermont Medical Center with the 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award for achieving sustainable improvements toward eliminating healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). [More]
Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Looking across evolutionary time and the genomic landscapes of humans and mice, an international group of researchers has found powerful clues to why certain processes and systems in the mouse - such as the immune system, metabolism and stress response - are so different from those in people. Building on years of mouse and gene regulation studies, they have developed a resource that can help scientists better understand how similarities and differences between mice and humans are written in their genomes. [More]
Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are significantly less likely to receive three routine cancer screenings - Pap tests, mammograms and clinical breast exams - than women in the general population, despite being at elevated risk for medical comorbidities and early death, a new study indicates. [More]