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FMNCA's disaster response program makes difference in patients' lives during Super Storm Sandy

FMNCA's disaster response program makes difference in patients' lives during Super Storm Sandy

Fresenius Medical Care North America, a division of Fresenius Medical Care and North America's largest provider of kidney care, hospitalist services and renal products, today hailed a new study by the Department of Health and Human Services this week showing that dialysis patients who received treatments immediately before Super Storm Sandy experienced a much better survival rate and less frequent visits to the hospital. [More]
New NEI study shows that microglia can accelerate damage wrought by blinding eye disorders

New NEI study shows that microglia can accelerate damage wrought by blinding eye disorders

Spider-like cells inside the brain, spinal cord and eye hunt for invaders, capturing and then devouring them. These cells, called microglia, often play a beneficial role by helping to clear trash and protect the central nervous system against infection. But a new study by researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) shows that they also accelerate damage wrought by blinding eye disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa. [More]
New study shows negative effects of using high heels

New study shows negative effects of using high heels

A new study showing the negative effects of prolonged high heel use confirms expert consensus on the footwear, according to a UNC Charlotte expert. [More]
Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Study of genetic mutations could lead to optimized treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients

Scientists have identified a group of genetic mutations in patients with aplastic anemia, which likely will help doctors optimize treatment for this rare and deadly blood condition. The study, appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine, could lead to tailor-made treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients as part of the emerging precision medicine movement. [More]
Use of antipsychotic drugs more common in boys than girls, research shows

Use of antipsychotic drugs more common in boys than girls, research shows

Boys are more likely than girls to receive a prescription for antipsychotic medication regardless of age, researchers have found. [More]
R. Rodney Howell receives ASHG’s annual Advocacy Award

R. Rodney Howell receives ASHG’s annual Advocacy Award

The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) has named R. Rodney Howell, MD, Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Chairman Emeritus of Pediatrics, and Member of the Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, at the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, as the first recipient of its new, annual Advocacy Award. [More]
National trial aims to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in post-acute and long-term care facilities

National trial aims to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in post-acute and long-term care facilities

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine will be leading a $1.5 million national trial to examine methods to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics in post-acute and long-term care (PA/LTC) facilities. [More]
Study: Umbilical cord milking improves blood pressure, red blood cell levels in preterm infants

Study: Umbilical cord milking improves blood pressure, red blood cell levels in preterm infants

A technique to increase the flow of blood from the umbilical cord into the infant's circulatory system improves blood pressure and red blood cell levels in preterm infants delivered by Cesarean section, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. [More]
NIDA announces recipients of Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS, genetics or epigenetics research

NIDA announces recipients of Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS, genetics or epigenetics research

The National Institute on Drug Abuse today announced the first six recipients of its two newly developed Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS and genetics or epigenetics research. The Avenir (meaning "future" in French) Awards support early stage investigators who propose highly innovative studies. The six scientists will each receive up to $300,000 per year for five years to support their research. [More]
Researchers call on government to drop restrictions on total fat consumption in Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Researchers call on government to drop restrictions on total fat consumption in Dietary Guidelines for Americans

In a Viewpoint published today in the Journal of the Medical Association (JAMA), researchers from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University and Boston Children's Hospital call on the federal government to drop restrictions on total fat consumption in the forthcoming 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. [More]
Three studies describe advances toward development of antibodies to stop HIV

Three studies describe advances toward development of antibodies to stop HIV

A trio of studies being published today in the journals Science and Cell describes advances toward the development of an HIV vaccine. The three study teams all demonstrated techniques for stimulating animal cells to produce antibodies that either could stop HIV from infecting human cells in the laboratory or had the potential to evolve into such antibodies. [More]
Researchers study effect of graphic novella in preventing hearing loss among Spanish-speaking ag workers

Researchers study effect of graphic novella in preventing hearing loss among Spanish-speaking ag workers

Graphic novels usually conjure up dark images of superheroes cleaning up the mean streets of Gotham or Metropolis. Mark Guiberson may not be a superhero, but he is trying to improve life for a particular population. [More]
New study launched in Liberia to better understand health consequences of Ebola virus disease

New study launched in Liberia to better understand health consequences of Ebola virus disease

The Liberia-U.S. clinical research partnership known as PREVAIL has launched a study of people in Liberia who have survived Ebola virus disease (EVD) within the past two years. The study investigators hope to better understand the long-term health consequences of EVD, determine if survivors develop immunity that will protect them from future Ebola infection, and assess whether previously EVD-infected individuals can transmit infection to close contacts and sexual partners. [More]
NIH-funded study identifies DOCK2 deficiency

NIH-funded study identifies DOCK2 deficiency

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have identified a new immune disorder--DOCK2 deficiency--named after the mutated gene responsible for the disease. [More]
New study could speed delivery of hospital discharge summary, potentially reduce hospital readmissions

New study could speed delivery of hospital discharge summary, potentially reduce hospital readmissions

New research could soon automate hospital discharge communication, adding critical data and cutting the time it takes the information to reach community health care providers from weeks to hours. [More]
ABC Medical Home program achieves significant health improvement for people with depression

ABC Medical Home program achieves significant health improvement for people with depression

The Aging Brain Care Medical Home, a novel population health management program implemented in the homes of older adults achieves significant health improvement for individuals with depression and also substantial stress reduction in family caregivers of dementia patients, according to a new study by investigators from the Regenstrief Institute, Indiana University Center for Aging Research and Eskenazi Health. [More]
Mayo Clinic, United Therapeutics partner to build and operate new lung restoration center on Mayo campus

Mayo Clinic, United Therapeutics partner to build and operate new lung restoration center on Mayo campus

Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., and United Therapeutics Corporation today announced a collaboration to build and operate a lung restoration center on the Mayo campus. The goal is to significantly increase the volume of lungs for transplantation by preserving and restoring selected marginal donor lungs, making them viable for transplantation. The restored lungs will be made available to patients at Mayo Clinic and other transplant centers throughout the United States. [More]

Study can help VHA to target suicide prevention efforts for high-risk patients

Clinicians are challenged every day to make difficult decisions regarding patients' suicide risk. Using Veterans Health Administration health system electronic medical record data, Veterans Affairs and National Institute of Mental Health scientists were able to identify very small groups of individuals within the VHA's patient population with very high, predicted suicide risk -- most of whom had not been identified for suicide risk by clinicians. [More]
Active video games can be a source of physical activity, shows UT study

Active video games can be a source of physical activity, shows UT study

The increasing use of video games is often blamed for children's lack of interest in physical activity, but a study by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, recently published in the Games for Health Journal suggests that active video games may actually be a source of moderate or intense physical activity in children five to eight years old. [More]
New UNC Charlotte technology to help hospitals organize, analyze patient statistics

New UNC Charlotte technology to help hospitals organize, analyze patient statistics

UNC Charlotte and a major healthcare data company have launched new technology that will help hospitals organize and analyze patient statistics. [More]
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