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Study shows why candidate vaccine used in HVTN 505 clinical trial not protective against HIV infection

Study shows why candidate vaccine used in HVTN 505 clinical trial not protective against HIV infection

A study by researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and Duke University helps explain why the candidate vaccine used in the HVTN 505 clinical trial was not protective against HIV infection despite robustly inducing anti-HIV antibodies: the vaccine stimulated antibodies that recognized HIV as well as microbes commonly found in the intestinal tract, part of the body's microbiome. [More]
Finding by UCSF researchers could increase availability of kidneys for transplant

Finding by UCSF researchers could increase availability of kidneys for transplant

Mild hypothermia in deceased organ donors significantly reduces delayed graft function in kidney transplant recipients when compared to normal body temperature, according to UC San Francisco researchers and collaborators, a finding that could lead to an increase in the availability of kidneys for transplant. [More]
National survey finds improvements in self-reported insurance coverage, access to care and health under ACA

National survey finds improvements in self-reported insurance coverage, access to care and health under ACA

Results of a national survey that included more than half a million adults indicates significant improvements in trends for self-reported insurance coverage, access to a personal physician and medications, affordability and health after the Affordable Care Act's first and second open enrollment periods, according to a study in the July 28 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on Medicare and Medicaid at 50. [More]
Parents with low health literacy less likely to select recommended weight-control strategies for children

Parents with low health literacy less likely to select recommended weight-control strategies for children

Parents who have low health literacy are less likely to choose government-recommended weight-loss strategies, such as increasing physical activity or serving more fruits and vegetables, to help their children control their weight than parents who are better able to understand basic health-related information, a new study suggests. [More]
Two-step regimen of experimental MERS vaccines show promise in mice

Two-step regimen of experimental MERS vaccines show promise in mice

A two-step regimen of experimental vaccines against Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) prompted immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, report National Institutes of Health scientists who designed the vaccines. Vaccinated mice produced broadly neutralizing antibodies against multiple strains of the MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV), while vaccinated macaques were protected from severe lung damage when later exposed to MERS-CoV. [More]
RGS2 protein plays significant role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice

RGS2 protein plays significant role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered a protein that plays a vital role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice. The protein RGS2 can delay an egg's development into an embryo in order to allow time for sperm to arrive and merge with the egg in a healthy fertilization process. The embryo cannot survive without the male chromosomes. [More]

Healthfirst notifies data privacy incident

Healthfirst, 100 Church Street, New York, New York 10007, is notifying approximately 5300 affected members and past members that their personal information may have been compromised in the course of a criminal fraud scheme perpetrated against Healthfirst. Social Security numbers and credit card information were not affected. [More]
Computerized attention-control training program significantly reduces PTSD symptoms among combat veterans

Computerized attention-control training program significantly reduces PTSD symptoms among combat veterans

A computerized attention-control training program significantly reduced combat veterans' preoccupation with - or avoidance of -- threat and attendant PTSD symptoms. By contrast, another type of computerized training, called attention bias modification - which has proven helpful in treating anxiety disorders - did not reduce PTSD symptoms. NIMH and Israeli researchers conducted parallel trials in which the two treatments were tested in US and Israeli combat veterans. [More]
Mana Health's software ManaPortal obtains ONC HIT 2014 Edition Modular EHR certification

Mana Health's software ManaPortal obtains ONC HIT 2014 Edition Modular EHR certification

Mana Health's ManaPortal version 1.0.0, has achieved ONC HIT 2014 Edition Modular EHR certification, which designates that the software is capable of supporting eligible providers and hospitals with meeting the Stage 1 and Stage 2 Meaningful Use measures required to qualify for funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. [More]

Direct Relief honored with Esri's Special Achievement in GIS Award

Direct Relief was honored by Esri today with a Special Achievement in GIS Award for its role in developing map applications for the One-Million Community Health Workers campaign (1mCHW), a joint initiative of the Sustainable Development Solutions Network and the Earth Institute at Columbia University. [More]
Multi-year project aims to develop, improve clinical research tools for studying ASD

Multi-year project aims to develop, improve clinical research tools for studying ASD

Government, non-profit, and other private partners will fund a multi-year project to develop and improve clinical research tools for studying autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The project will receive a total of $28 million over the next four years to test and refine clinical measures of social impairment in ASD in order to better evaluate potential behavioral and drug therapies. [More]
Unique collaboration aims to transform geriatric care in North Texas

Unique collaboration aims to transform geriatric care in North Texas

UNT Health Science Center will team up with JPS Health Network, Texas Christian University and the United Way's Area Agency on Aging of Tarrant County to transform geriatric care in North Texas by improving medical training and health-care delivery for the region's rapidly growing population of older residents. [More]
Researchers devise way to induce protective immunity in mice against influenza viruses

Researchers devise way to induce protective immunity in mice against influenza viruses

A vaccine that protects against a wide variety of influenza viruses (a so-called universal flu vaccine) is a critical public health goal given the significant rates of illness and death caused by seasonal influenza and the potentially devastating effects of a pandemic influenza strain. [More]
Early antiretroviral treatment prevents AIDS- and non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people

Early antiretroviral treatment prevents AIDS- and non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people

Starting antiretroviral therapy early not only prevents serious AIDS-related diseases, but also prevents the onset of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people, according to a new analysis of data from the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study, the first large-scale randomized clinical trial to establish that earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits all HIV-infected individuals. [More]
Young, single South African women adhere well to daily PrEP regimen to prevent HIV infection

Young, single South African women adhere well to daily PrEP regimen to prevent HIV infection

A clinical study funded by the National Institutes of Health has found that young, single black women in South Africa adhered to a daily pill regimen to prevent HIV infection--an HIV prevention strategy known as pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP. This finding is the first strong indication that this population at substantial HIV risk could accept and reliably adhere to daily PrEP dosing. [More]
Study findings provide basis for potential development of new methods to control HIV infection

Study findings provide basis for potential development of new methods to control HIV infection

Lower levels of cholesterol in certain immune cells--a result of enhanced cholesterol metabolism within those cells--may help explain why some HIV-infected people are able to naturally control disease progression, according to research that will be presented in a poster at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2015) in Vancouver, Canada, and the pre-conference 2015 Towards an HIV Cure Symposium. [More]
Two dietary modeling studies examine potential impact of sodium reduction ingredient on sodium intake

Two dietary modeling studies examine potential impact of sodium reduction ingredient on sodium intake

Sodium intake in the U.S. exceeds dietary recommendations and has been identified as a nutrient of public health concern in the Scientific Report of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee due to its link to increased risk of hypertension, heart disease, and stroke. [More]
Next-generation tissue implant allows neuroscientists to wirelessly control neurons inside the brains of mice

Next-generation tissue implant allows neuroscientists to wirelessly control neurons inside the brains of mice

A study showed that scientists can wirelessly determine the path a mouse walks with a press of a button. Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, and University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, created a remote controlled, next-generation tissue implant that allows neuroscientists to inject drugs and shine lights on neurons deep inside the brains of mice. [More]
Air pollution from wildfires may heighten risk of heart-related incidents

Air pollution from wildfires may heighten risk of heart-related incidents

Air pollution from wildfires may increase risk of cardiac arrests, and other sudden acute heart problems, researchers have found. [More]
Teen birth, mental illness increase hospitalization of children in Texas

Teen birth, mental illness increase hospitalization of children in Texas

From 2004 to 2010 in Texas, mental illness was the most common reason for the hospitalization of children ages 10-14 while pregnancy/birth was the most common reason for the hospitalization of adolescents ages 15-17, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School. [More]
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