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University of Vermont Medical Center recognized with 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award

University of Vermont Medical Center recognized with 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America today recognized the University of Vermont Medical Center with the 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award for achieving sustainable improvements toward eliminating healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). [More]
Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Looking across evolutionary time and the genomic landscapes of humans and mice, an international group of researchers has found powerful clues to why certain processes and systems in the mouse - such as the immune system, metabolism and stress response - are so different from those in people. Building on years of mouse and gene regulation studies, they have developed a resource that can help scientists better understand how similarities and differences between mice and humans are written in their genomes. [More]
Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are significantly less likely to receive three routine cancer screenings - Pap tests, mammograms and clinical breast exams - than women in the general population, despite being at elevated risk for medical comorbidities and early death, a new study indicates. [More]
Three-drug regimen taken during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission

Three-drug regimen taken during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission

For HIV-infected women in good immune health, taking a three-drug regimen during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission more effectively than taking one drug during pregnancy, another during labor and two more after giving birth, an international clinical trial has found. [More]
UNMC gets $2.5 million grant to make EHR more useful for physicians, safer for patients

UNMC gets $2.5 million grant to make EHR more useful for physicians, safer for patients

The University of Nebraska Medical Center has received a $2.5 million grant to make the electronic health record (EHR) more useful for health professionals and safer for patients. [More]
Uber brings on-demand flu prevention to Chicago

Uber brings on-demand flu prevention to Chicago

In partnership with Vaccine Finder, Uber is bringing on-demand flu prevention to Chicago. UberHEALTH helps Chicagoans stay healthy this season with flu prevention packs on demand TODAY, Nov. 18 from 10 am until 4 pm CST for free. [More]
NIH study finds limited kidney benefit from more rigorous blood pressure treatment

NIH study finds limited kidney benefit from more rigorous blood pressure treatment

Using two drugs was no more effective than a single drug in slowing disease progression in people with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), according to two studies funded by the National Institutes of Health. One of the studies also showed that rigorous blood pressure treatment slowed growth of kidney cysts, a marker of ADPKD, but had little effect on kidney function compared to standard blood pressure treatment. [More]
Antibiograms could improve antibiotic effectiveness, help address problems with antibiotic resistance

Antibiograms could improve antibiotic effectiveness, help address problems with antibiotic resistance

Use of "antibiograms" in skilled nursing facilities could improve antibiotic effectiveness and help address problems with antibiotic resistance that are becoming a national crisis, researchers conclude in a new study. [More]
UTHealth professor wins 2014 APGAR Award for contributions to perinatal medicine and education

UTHealth professor wins 2014 APGAR Award for contributions to perinatal medicine and education

Jon Tyson, M.D., M.P.H., the Michelle Bain Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Public Health at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School, has won the 2014 APGAR Award for his lifelong contributions to perinatal medicine and education. [More]
Surgical treatment of obesity, diabetes as safe as other commonly performed surgical procedures

Surgical treatment of obesity, diabetes as safe as other commonly performed surgical procedures

Laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes, once considered a high-risk procedure, carries a complication and mortality rate comparable to some of the safest and most commonly performed surgeries in America, including gallbladder surgery, appendectomy, and total knee replacement, according to new research from the Cleveland Clinic Bariatric and Metabolic Institute. [More]
Genetically diverse mouse model can predict human response to chemical exposures

Genetically diverse mouse model can predict human response to chemical exposures

A genetically diverse mouse model is able to predict the range of response to chemical exposures that might be observed in human populations, researchers from the National Institutes of Health have found. Like humans, each Diversity Outbred mouse is genetically unique, and the extent of genetic variability among these mice is similar to the genetic variation seen among humans. [More]
Obeticholic acid improves liver health in people with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

Obeticholic acid improves liver health in people with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

An experimental drug aimed at treating a common liver disease showed promising results and potential problems in a multicenter clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health. The FLINT study found that people with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) who took obeticholic acid (OCA) had improved liver health during that period, including decreased inflammation and fat in the liver and decreased body weight versus people receiving a placebo. OCA was also associated with increases in itching and total cholesterol. [More]
Chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean, Central and South America continues to spread

Chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean, Central and South America continues to spread

Fall in the United States means residents in most of the country will see fewer mosquitoes and less risk of the diseases they spread. However, the chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean and Central and South American countries continues to spread with no sign of slowing down. Experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are warning that the painful mosquito-borne disease will likely continue to infect travelers to the region during the rest of this year and beyond. [More]
Dr. D. A. Henderson named recipient of Prince Mahidol Award in Public Health

Dr. D. A. Henderson named recipient of Prince Mahidol Award in Public Health

The Prince Mahidol Award Foundation announced today that its 2014 recipient of the Prince Mahidol Award in Public Health is Dr. D. A. Henderson, Distinguished Scholar at the UPMC Center for Health Security in Baltimore, Maryland. [More]
M2Gen, Moffitt to serve as Central Laboratory and Biorepository for The National MDS Study

M2Gen, Moffitt to serve as Central Laboratory and Biorepository for The National MDS Study

Moffitt Cancer Center and M2Gen have been awarded a contract from the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) to serve as the Central Laboratory and Biorepository for The National Myelodysplastic Syndromes Natural History Study (The National MDS Study). [More]
Eight million US women skip cervical cancer screening in the past five years

Eight million US women skip cervical cancer screening in the past five years

Despite evidence that cervical cancer screening saves lives, about eight million women ages 21 to 65 years have not been screened for cervical cancer in the past five years, according to a new Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than half of new cervical cancer cases occur among women who have never or rarely been screened. [More]
Modern bariatric surgery can cut medications in obesity patients

Modern bariatric surgery can cut medications in obesity patients

Patients with obesity take significantly fewer medications after weight-loss surgery than their non-surgical counterparts, and end up spending 22.4 percent less on drugs for diabetes and heart disease after four years, according to new research. [More]
Hemp Health launches CBD wellness supplements

Hemp Health launches CBD wellness supplements

Hemp Health Inc., a pioneer in hemp cannabidiol (CBD) products, today launched their line of CBD wellness supplements. Available in oil, spray and capsule form, Hemp Health's products offer a compelling alternative to medical marijuana. The CBD supplements provide consumers with the therapeutic ingredient in hemp while allowing them to avoid the negative mental and physical effects of marijuana. [More]
Precision awarded $28 million contract to provide management of disease-study specimens for NIAID

Precision awarded $28 million contract to provide management of disease-study specimens for NIAID

Precision for Medicine announced today that its subsidiary, Precision Bioservices, Inc., has been awarded a 7-year contract of up to $28 million to provide management and oversight of disease-study specimens for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. [More]
Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service receives grant to help reduce chronic diseases

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service receives grant to help reduce chronic diseases

The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service has been awarded a "Programs to Reduce Obesity in High-Obesity Areas" grant to support national efforts by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to reduce chronic diseases, promote healthier lifestyles, reduce health disparities and control health care spending. [More]