Health and Human Services News and Research RSS Feed - Health and Human Services News and Research

FDA approves new biosimilar for multiple inflammatory diseases

FDA approves new biosimilar for multiple inflammatory diseases

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Amjevita (adalimumab-atto) as a biosimilar to Humira (adalimumab) for multiple inflammatory diseases. [More]
UofL researchers receive NIH funding to explore how environmental exposures influence health of children

UofL researchers receive NIH funding to explore how environmental exposures influence health of children

The National Institutes of Health today announced a team of researchers headed by Janice Sullivan, M.D., of the University of Louisville is among grant recipients nationwide receiving funding for a seven-year, multicenter initiative called Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes. [More]
Sanford wins $11.7 million NIH grant to translate laboratory cancer research into clinical trials

Sanford wins $11.7 million NIH grant to translate laboratory cancer research into clinical trials

The Cancer Biology Research Center at Sanford Research is the recipient of a five-year, nearly $11.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to translate laboratory research into clinical trials for head and neck and pediatric cancers. [More]
Sarepta Therapeutics wins accelerated approval from FDA for Duchenne muscular dystrophy drug

Sarepta Therapeutics wins accelerated approval from FDA for Duchenne muscular dystrophy drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Exondys 51 (eteplirsen) injection, the first drug approved to treat patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). [More]
FDA authorizes marketing of new Aera system to treat patients with chronic ETD symptoms

FDA authorizes marketing of new Aera system to treat patients with chronic ETD symptoms

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today permitted marketing of a device that uses a small balloon to treat persistent Eustachian tube dysfunction (ETD), a condition in which pressure, pain or clogged or muffled sensations occur in the ear. [More]
FDA warns retailers for selling newly regulated tobacco products to minors

FDA warns retailers for selling newly regulated tobacco products to minors

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today it has taken action against 55 tobacco retailers by issuing the first warning letters for selling newly regulated tobacco products, such as e-cigarettes, e-liquids and cigars, to minors. [More]
Incorporating laughter into exercise program could provide health benefits to older adults

Incorporating laughter into exercise program could provide health benefits to older adults

Incorporating laughter into a physical activity program that is focused on strength, balance and flexibility could improve older adults' mental health, aerobic endurance and confidence in their ability to exercise, according to a study led by Georgia State University. [More]
FDA approval of VisuMax Femtosecond Laser expands surgical treatment options for myopia

FDA approval of VisuMax Femtosecond Laser expands surgical treatment options for myopia

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the VisuMax Femtosecond Laser for the small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) procedure to reduce or eliminate nearsightedness in certain patients 22 years of age or older. [More]

FDA awards $21.8 million to support states in implementing FSMA produce safety rule

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced the awarding of a total of $21.8 million to support 42 states to help implement the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) produce safety rule. [More]
TB lesions may remain in lungs long after completion of treatment

TB lesions may remain in lungs long after completion of treatment

Patients with active tuberculosis of the lungs, the infectious form of the disease known as pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), are typically treated with several medications for a period of six months. [More]
Six NIH-funded projects aim to identify biological factors that affect neural regeneration

Six NIH-funded projects aim to identify biological factors that affect neural regeneration

The National Institutes of Health will fund six projects to identify biological factors that affect neural regeneration in the retina. [More]
Complementary health approaches appear to be effective in helping manage pain

Complementary health approaches appear to be effective in helping manage pain

Data from a review of U.S.-based clinical trials published today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings suggest that some of the most popular complementary health approaches--such as yoga, tai chi, and acupuncture--appear to be effective tools for helping to manage common pain conditions. [More]
Hospitalizations for injection drug use-related infective endocarditis increasing among young Americans

Hospitalizations for injection drug use-related infective endocarditis increasing among young Americans

Hospitalizations for infective endocarditis, a heart valve infection often attributed to injection drug use, have increased significantly among young adult Americans--particularly in whites and females--according to a new study by researchers from Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University School of Medicine. [More]
Surveys find public awareness about heart valve disease alarmingly low in the U.S.

Surveys find public awareness about heart valve disease alarmingly low in the U.S.

New public opinion surveys released today by the nonprofit Alliance for Aging Research show that public awareness about heart valve disease (HVD) in the U.S. is alarmingly low. [More]
FAU's College of Nursing receives HRSA grant for advanced education program

FAU's College of Nursing receives HRSA grant for advanced education program

The Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing at Florida Atlantic University has received a three-year, $2 million grant from the Health Resources & Services Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for an advanced nursing education program titled, "Caring-based Academic Partnerships to Enhance Nurse Practitioner Readiness and Willingness to Practice in Rural and Underserved Communities." [More]
NCATS scientists identify promising compounds effective in inhibiting Zika virus replication

NCATS scientists identify promising compounds effective in inhibiting Zika virus replication

Researchers at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences recently identified compounds that potentially can be used to inhibit Zika virus replication and reduce its ability to kill brain cells. [More]
Revised FDA guidance recommends universal testing of entire blood supply for Zika virus in the U.S.

Revised FDA guidance recommends universal testing of entire blood supply for Zika virus in the U.S.

As a further safety measure against the emerging Zika virus outbreak, today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a revised guidance recommending universal testing of donated Whole Blood and blood components for Zika virus in the U.S. and its territories. [More]
Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers have succeeded in culturing norovirus in human intestinal cells, a breakthrough that could help scientists develop novel therapeutics and vaccines against the debilitating effects of the virus. [More]
ISCT announces reasons for opposing current version of REGROW Act on cell therapies

ISCT announces reasons for opposing current version of REGROW Act on cell therapies

The International Society for Cellular Therapy, the global society of clinicians, researchers, regulatory specialists, technologists, and industry partners dedicated to the translation of cellular therapy into safe and effective therapies to improve patients’ lives, today announces its reasons for opposition to the current version of the REGROW Act - the US government’s legislative efforts to promote faster patient access to effective new cellular therapies. [More]
NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

National Institutes of Health researchers have discovered a rare and sometimes lethal inflammatory disease - otulipenia - that primarily affects young children. They have also identified anti-inflammatory treatments that ease some of the patients' symptoms: fever, skin rashes, diarrhea, joint pain and overall failure to grow or thrive. [More]
Advertisement