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Iron deficiency: an interview with Dr Thierry Teil

Iron deficiency: an interview with Dr Thierry Teil

Iron deficiency is, in fact, one of the most common nutritional disorders. It affects between three and five billion people, which is between half and two-thirds of the world population (about seven billion). Iron deficiency anemia is a subset of iron deficiency, that is about two billion people according to the WHO... [More]
Mildly elevated body iron contributes to prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes

Mildly elevated body iron contributes to prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes

Even mildly elevated body iron contributes to the prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
Early identification may be key to stop type 2 diabetes

Early identification may be key to stop type 2 diabetes

What's the best way to stop type 2 diabetes? Find it before it becomes a problem. "The phrase I use is prevention by detection," said Joseph Aloi, M.D., section chief of endocrinology and metabolism at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. [More]
New wearable medical device may reduce visceral fat, improve blood glucose in diabetes patients

New wearable medical device may reduce visceral fat, improve blood glucose in diabetes patients

Although effective for the treatment of diabetes, exercise is sometimes difficult for overweight or elderly people. [More]
Women have lower risk of developing heart disease after bariatric surgery than men, research shows

Women have lower risk of developing heart disease after bariatric surgery than men, research shows

Women have about a 20 percent less chance of developing heart disease after weight-loss surgery than men, according to new research presented today at ObesityWeek 2016, the largest international event focused on the basic science, clinical application and prevention and treatment of obesity. [More]
Advances in POC diabetes testing: an interview with Gavin Jones

Advances in POC diabetes testing: an interview with Gavin Jones

Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is well recognized as a reliable measure for glycemic control. The role of HbA1c testing in the management of patients with diabetes has been well established for several decades. HbA1c levels reflect the average circulating glucose concentration over the lifespan of... [More]
High fitness levels offer effective protection against health problems caused by work-related stress

High fitness levels offer effective protection against health problems caused by work-related stress

It is a well-known fact that fitness and well-being go hand in hand. But being in good shape also protects against the health problems that arise when we feel particularly stressed at work. [More]
Long-term oxygen therapy does not benefit COPD patients with moderately low blood oxygen levels

Long-term oxygen therapy does not benefit COPD patients with moderately low blood oxygen levels

A newly published study of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) concludes that long-term supplemental oxygen treatment results in little or no change in time to death, time to first hospitalizations or significant quality of life improvements for those with moderately low blood oxygen levels. [More]
Climbing Mount Kilimanjaro to research oxygen deprivation

Climbing Mount Kilimanjaro to research oxygen deprivation

This expedition was a part of our clinical collaboration with the Mayo Clinic. In short, this particular study focused on the effect of altitude and aging on heart and lung function. [More]
Yale researchers use new gene editing technique to correct mutations that cause thalassemia

Yale researchers use new gene editing technique to correct mutations that cause thalassemia

A Yale-led research team used a new gene editing strategy to correct mutations that cause thalassemia, a form of anemia. [More]
Many ulcerative colitis patients with anemia do not receive testing and treatment, study reports

Many ulcerative colitis patients with anemia do not receive testing and treatment, study reports

Many patients with ulcerative colitis don't receive recommended testing and treatment for the common problem of iron deficiency anemia, reports a study in the October issue of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, official journal of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA). The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Study assesses impact of diabetes mellitus on cardiac geometry

Study assesses impact of diabetes mellitus on cardiac geometry

A study of U.S. Hispanics with diabetes mellitus showed a link between impaired glucose regulation and adverse measures of cardiac function and structure. [More]
NIH funds innovative study to examine use of text messaging in improving diabetes care

NIH funds innovative study to examine use of text messaging in improving diabetes care

Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute has received a five-year, $2.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to fund an innovative clinical trial that will use mHealth technology and text messaging to improve type 2 diabetes management among high-risk Hispanic patients in San Diego County. [More]
EKF Diagnostics’ novel diabetic biomarker test successfully externally verified

EKF Diagnostics’ novel diabetic biomarker test successfully externally verified

EKF Diagnostics, the global in vitro diagnostics company, announces that its newly introduced Glycated Serum Protein (GSP) LiquiColor® diabetic biomarker test has been verified for use on the Siemens Vista chemistry analyzer. [More]
Genome engineering-based methods pave way for new treatment of patients with sickle cell disease

Genome engineering-based methods pave way for new treatment of patients with sickle cell disease

A team of physicians and laboratory scientists has taken a key step toward a cure for sickle cell disease, using CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to fix the mutated gene responsible for the disease in stem cells from the blood of affected patients. [More]
Duke researchers devise computerized method for rapid, accurate diagnosis of malaria

Duke researchers devise computerized method for rapid, accurate diagnosis of malaria

Duke researchers have devised a computerized method to autonomously and quickly diagnose malaria with clinically relevant accuracy -- a crucial step to successfully treating the disease and halting its spread. [More]
JAK inhibitors show promise in restoring hair growth in patients with alopecia areata

JAK inhibitors show promise in restoring hair growth in patients with alopecia areata

Seventy-five percent of patients with moderate to severe alopecia areata--an autoimmune disease that causes patchy, and less frequently, total hair loss--had significant hair regrowth after treatment with ruxolitinib, reported researchers from Columbia University Medical Center. By the end of their treatment, average hair regrowth was 92 percent. [More]
Rutgers researchers aim to set blood transfusion standards for heart attack patients

Rutgers researchers aim to set blood transfusion standards for heart attack patients

A Rutgers physician who has championed the movement to use less blood in transfusions has been awarded more than $16.1 million by the National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to lead a nation-wide clinical trial to evaluate whether a restrictive or a liberal blood transfusion is most beneficial to patients who have had a heart attack. [More]
New lab-on-a-chip system can detect effects of toxic substances on hemoglobin in blood

New lab-on-a-chip system can detect effects of toxic substances on hemoglobin in blood

A new lab-on-a-chip system, developed by the University of Twente in The Netherlands, is capable of fast analysis of the effects of toxic substances on hemoglobin, for example. It mimicks human metabolism. [More]
JAK inhibitors may be first effective treatment for people with alopecia areata

JAK inhibitors may be first effective treatment for people with alopecia areata

Seventy-five percent of patients with moderate to severe alopecia areata—an autoimmune disease that causes patchy, and less frequently, total hair loss—had significant hair regrowth after treatment with ruxolitinib, reported researchers from Columbia University Medical Center. By the end of their treatment, average hair regrowth was 92 percent. [More]