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Hemophilia is a rare, inherited bleeding disorder in which your blood doesn’t clot normally. If you have hemophilia, you may bleed for a longer time than others after an injury. You also may bleed internally, especially in your knees, ankles, and elbows. This bleeding can damage your organs or tissues and, sometimes, be fatal.
TSRI researchers find potential new weapon to combat C. difficile infections

TSRI researchers find potential new weapon to combat C. difficile infections

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered a potential new weapon against Clostridium difficile, a bacterium that causes hundreds of thousands of severe intestinal infections in the U.S. every year and is frequently fatal. [More]
TSRI study sheds light on how mitochondrial calcium can affect learning and memory

TSRI study sheds light on how mitochondrial calcium can affect learning and memory

While calcium's importance for our bones and teeth is well known, its role in neurons—in particular, its effects on processes such as learning and memory—has been less well defined. [More]
TSRI scientists find evidence supporting new therapeutic strategy against cocaine addiction

TSRI scientists find evidence supporting new therapeutic strategy against cocaine addiction

An international team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has found strong evidence supporting a new strategy against drug addiction. [More]
New study suggests increased levels of hypocretin in the brain may play role in cocaine addiction

New study suggests increased levels of hypocretin in the brain may play role in cocaine addiction

A new study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, funded by the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Drug Abuse and National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, suggests that increased levels of a molecule in the brain, called hypocretin, may contribute to cocaine addiction. [More]
Scientists link malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart abnormalities in SCA

Scientists link malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart abnormalities in SCA

Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) develop heart complications and nearly a quarter die a sudden death. Now, researchers have linked malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart anomalies in SCA that result from progressive fibrosis and result in sudden death. [More]
New research opens door to influencing immune system

New research opens door to influencing immune system

A new international collaboration involving scientists at The Scripps Research Institute opens a door to influencing the immune system, which would be useful to boost the effectiveness of vaccines or to counter autoimmune diseases such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new dual-targeting drug candidate for treating diabetes and bone disease

TSRI scientists develop new dual-targeting drug candidate for treating diabetes and bone disease

In addition to its more obvious ills, type 2 diabetes is a condition closely associated with bone fractures, increasing the risk of fractures twofold. To make matters worse, certain anti-diabetic drugs further increase this risk, particularly in postmenopausal women, severely limiting their treatment options. [More]
Scientists receive $2.4 million grant to advance stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease

Scientists receive $2.4 million grant to advance stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and Scripps Clinic have received a grant of nearly $2.4 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to support safety and quality tests of a potential stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease. [More]
UNC professor identifies research priorities to address VTE in cancer patients

UNC professor identifies research priorities to address VTE in cancer patients

More than 20 percent of all blood clots in veins occur in cancer patients. These clots, also known as venous thromboembolism (VTE), pose serious threats for cancer patients. [More]
TSRI awarded $20 million for first year of precision medicine initiative cohort program

TSRI awarded $20 million for first year of precision medicine initiative cohort program

As part of the most ambitious medical research program in the history of American medicine, The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has received an initial award of $20 million for its role in a national precision medicine initiative, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced today. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new strategy to design potential HIV vaccine candidates

TSRI scientists develop new strategy to design potential HIV vaccine candidates

Want to catch a criminal? Show a mugshot on the news. Want to stop HIV infections? Get the immune system to recognize and attack the virus's tell-tale structure. That's part of the basic approach behind efforts at The Scripps Research Institute to design an AIDS vaccine. [More]
TSRI scientists identify GlyRS protein that launches cancer growth

TSRI scientists identify GlyRS protein that launches cancer growth

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified a protein that launches cancer growth and appears to contribute to higher mortality in breast cancer patients. [More]
Study reveals surprising diversity in single neuronal transcriptomes of the brain

Study reveals surprising diversity in single neuronal transcriptomes of the brain

A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, University of California, San Diego and Illumina, Inc., has completed the first large-scale assessment of single neuronal "transcriptomes." [More]
TSRI scientists develop novel technique for finding drug candidates

TSRI scientists develop novel technique for finding drug candidates

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a powerful new method for finding drug candidates that bind to specific proteins. [More]
Study provides more insight into treatment options for severe hemophilia A

Study provides more insight into treatment options for severe hemophilia A

Families of children with severe hemophilia A may want to take a fresh look at treatment options from human plasma. A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine on May 26 showed that participants who received a recombinant therapy— the present standard in the United States — developed antibodies or "inhibitors" to the treatments at almost twice the rate as those whose treatments were made from human plasma. [More]
Scientists use new technique to repair fibrotic liver cells within the organ

Scientists use new technique to repair fibrotic liver cells within the organ

Advances in stem cell research have made it possible to convert patients' skin cells into heart cells, kidney cells, liver cells and more in the lab dish, giving researchers hope that one day such cells could replace organ transplantation for patients with organ failure. [More]
SIPPET study may have implications for treatment of patients with severe hemophilia A

SIPPET study may have implications for treatment of patients with severe hemophilia A

SIPPET, a study which involved 42 centers in 14 countries in Europe, North and South America, Africa and Asia was designed to definitively settle the long-debated question whether factor VIII concentrates from different sources (plasma-derived containing VWF or recombinant technology) differ in risk of inhibitor development in previously untreated children (PUPs) with severe hemophilia A. [More]
Common pain and anti-inflammation drugs may slow cancer growth

Common pain and anti-inflammation drugs may slow cancer growth

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have found that one of the most widely prescribed pain and anti-inflammation drugs slows the growth rate of a specific kind of cancer in animal models and suggests the medication could have the same effect on other types of tumors. [More]
Jumping genes may play crucial role in generation of cancer

Jumping genes may play crucial role in generation of cancer

For more than 50 years, scientists have known of the existence of "jumping genes," strands of DNA material that can move from one location in the genome to another. [More]
TSRI scientists design potential drug candidate to treat triple negative breast cancer

TSRI scientists design potential drug candidate to treat triple negative breast cancer

In a development that could lead to a new generation of drugs to precisely treat a range of diseases, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have for the first time designed a drug candidate that decreases the growth of tumor cells in animal models in one of the hardest to treat cancers—triple negative breast cancer. [More]
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