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Hepatitis A (formerly known as ''infectious hepatitis'') is an acute infectious disease of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV), which is most commonly transmitted by the fecal-oral route via contaminated food or drinking water.
Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly comes to end after approving many new resolutions

The Sixty-ninth World Health Assembly closed today after approving new resolutions on WHO's Framework for Engagement with Non-State Actors; the Sustainable Development Goals; the International Health Regulations; tobacco control; road traffic deaths and injuries; nutrition; HIV, hepatitis and STIs; mycetoma; research and development; access to medicines and integrated health services. [More]
Research shows viruses work in groups to attack host cells more effectively

Research shows viruses work in groups to attack host cells more effectively

Research at the Cavanilles Institute of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology of the University of Valencia, led by professor Rafael Sanjuán, reveals that viruses work in groups to attack host cells more effectively. The results of this study were published in the journal 'Cell Host & Microbe'. [More]
Analysis reveals improved survivorship for acute liver failure patients

Analysis reveals improved survivorship for acute liver failure patients

More patients hospitalized with acute liver failure - often the result of acetaminophen overdose - are surviving, including those who receive a liver transplant and those who don't, an analysis led by a UT Southwestern Medical Center researcher showed. [More]
Researchers discover human equivalent DAMP protein in plants

Researchers discover human equivalent DAMP protein in plants

A protein that signals tissue damage to the human immune system has a counterpart that plays a similar role in plants, report researchers at the Boyce Thompson Institute. [More]
Distinctive gene 'signature' may lead to new way to diagnose Lyme disease

Distinctive gene 'signature' may lead to new way to diagnose Lyme disease

Researchers at UC San Francisco and Johns Hopkins may have found a new way to diagnose Lyme disease, based on a distinctive gene "signature" they discovered in white blood cells of patients infected with the tick-borne bacteria. [More]
Vaccinations could have significant economic value

Vaccinations could have significant economic value

Vaccinations, long recognized as an excellent investment that saves lives and prevents illness, could have significant economic value that far exceeds their original cost, a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found. [More]
Experimental nanoparticle therapy shows promise for fighting primary liver cancer

Experimental nanoparticle therapy shows promise for fighting primary liver cancer

An experimental nanoparticle therapy that combines low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and fish oil preferentially kills primary liver cancer cells without harming healthy cells, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report. [More]
World Hepatitis Alliance calls for comprehensive hepatitis strategies to help prevent liver cancer deaths

World Hepatitis Alliance calls for comprehensive hepatitis strategies to help prevent liver cancer deaths

Rock-icon David Bowie died recently at the age of 69 after a battle with what is being reported as liver cancer. Each year, more than 800,000 people die from liver cancer globally, the second biggest cancer killer. Yet, a high majority of these deaths are completely preventable. [More]
UC Davis researchers develop Hepatitis virus-like particles to target breast cancer

UC Davis researchers develop Hepatitis virus-like particles to target breast cancer

UC Davis researchers have developed a way to use the empty shell of a Hepatitis E virus to carry vaccines or drugs into the body. The technique has been tested in rodents as a way to target breast cancer, and is available for commercial licensing through UC Davis Office of Research. [More]
Drinking extra 2 cups of coffee per day may reduce cirrhosis risk by 44%

Drinking extra 2 cups of coffee per day may reduce cirrhosis risk by 44%

Regular consumption of coffee was linked with a reduced risk of liver cirrhosis in a review of relevant studies published before July 2015. [More]
EC approves expanded use of Daklinza (daclatasvir) for patients with chronic HCV and HIV co-infection

EC approves expanded use of Daklinza (daclatasvir) for patients with chronic HCV and HIV co-infection

Bristol-Myers Squibb today announced that the European Commission has approved the expanded use of Daklinza, a first-in-class oral, once-a-day pill used in combination with other treatments as an option for adult patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection who are co-infected with HIV or who have had a prior liver transplant. [More]
NJHA honors several individuals and organizations with Healthcare Leader Awards

NJHA honors several individuals and organizations with Healthcare Leader Awards

The New Jersey Hospital Association, the state's oldest and largest healthcare trade association, today held its annual awards program to honor several individuals and organizations for their commitment to the state's healthcare system and the patients and communities they serve. [More]
Zepatier receives FDA approval for treatment of chronic HCV genotypes 1 and 4 infections

Zepatier receives FDA approval for treatment of chronic HCV genotypes 1 and 4 infections

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zepatier (elbasvir and grazoprevir) with or without ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 1 and 4 infections in adult patients. [More]
FDA expands use of Opdivo + Yervoy Regimen for BRAF V600 mutant and wild-type advanced melanoma

FDA expands use of Opdivo + Yervoy Regimen for BRAF V600 mutant and wild-type advanced melanoma

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Opdivo in combination with Yervoy for the treatment of patients with BRAF V600 wild-type and BRAF V600 mutation-positive unresectable or metastatic melanoma. [More]
Monitoring HBcrAg levels could help optimise PEG-IFN therapy

Monitoring HBcrAg levels could help optimise PEG-IFN therapy

Serum hepatitis B core-related antigen could serve as a quantitative marker of response to pegylated interferon therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection positive for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), findings indicate. [More]
Rescue TDF monotherapy effective in multidrug resistant chronic HBV

Rescue TDF monotherapy effective in multidrug resistant chronic HBV

Researchers from the Republic of Korea say that rescue therapy with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate alone is an appropriate option for patients with multidrug resistant chronic hepatitis B virus infection. [More]
STAT4 variant predicts HBV IFNα response

STAT4 variant predicts HBV IFNα response

Variation in the STAT4 gene is associated with response to interferon (IFN)α therapy in patients with hepatitis B e antigen-positive chronic hepatitis B virus infection, suggests research published in Hepatology. [More]
Only 17.4% of nurses comply with all nine standard precautions for infection prevention

Only 17.4% of nurses comply with all nine standard precautions for infection prevention

Only 17.4 percent of ambulatory care nurses reported compliance in all nine standard precautions for infection prevention, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
Study outlines new model to help predict age-related response to hepatitis B vaccine

Study outlines new model to help predict age-related response to hepatitis B vaccine

Physicians have known for years that patients respond differently to vaccines as they age. There may soon be a new way to predict and enhance the effectiveness of vaccinations, in particular the hepatitis B vaccine. [More]
Scientists reveal why non-alcoholic steatohepatitis worsens in obese people

Scientists reveal why non-alcoholic steatohepatitis worsens in obese people

In results published on October 19, 2015 in the Journal of Lipid Research, a team of translational scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina report a new reason why non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) worsens in people who are obese. [More]
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